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  • 1.
    Johansson, Elsie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nurse’s consolation: A grounded theory study2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, consolation has not been clearly defined in nursing science. The purpose of this study was to identify the phenomenon of consolation from the perspective of practising nurses. Data from interviews with 21 nurses were analysed by means of the grounded theory approach. Consolation comprised supportive consolation, avoiding consolation, insufficient consolation and inaccessible consolation, which were integrated into the nurses’ professional approach and personal outlook. More basic research is required in order to illuminate the meaning of the phenomenon of consolation with focus on supportive consolation as well as the non-consolation phenomenon comprising the so-called avoiding, insufficient and inaccessible consolation. In order for nurses to be able to prescribe, carry out and evaluate consoling care which alleviates patient suffering, there is a need for further knowledge of what constitutes and does not constitute consolation.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Elsie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Roxberg, Åsa
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nurses' consolation: a grounded theory study2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, consolation has not been clearly defined in nursing science. The purpose of this study was to identify the phenomenon of consolation from the perspective of practising nurses. Data from interviews with 21 nurses were analysed by means of the grounded theory approach. Consolation comprised supportive consolation, avoiding consolation, insufficient consolation and inaccessible consolation, which were integrated into the nurses’professional approach and personal outlook. More basic research is required in order to illuminate the meaning of the phenomenon of consolation with focus on supportive consolation as well as the non-consolation phenomenon comprising the so-called avoiding, insufficient and inaccessible consolation. In order for nurses to be able to prescribe, carry out and evaluate consoling care which alleviates patient suffering, there is a need for further knowledge of what constitutes and does not constitute consolation.

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