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  • 1.
    Abram, S.
    et al.
    University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom & Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Digital Ethnography Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia & Loughborough University, Schools of Design and Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Introduction: Mediating publics and anthropology2015In: Media, anthropology and public engagement / [ed] Sarah Pink & Simone Abram, New York: Berghahn Books, 2015, Vol. 9, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2. Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Pink, Sarah
    Fors, Vaike
    Automation in the Wild: exploring empathy2015In: Un/Certainty / [ed] Sarah Pink & Yoko Akama, Melbourne: RMIT University , 2015, p. 50-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Brodersen, Meike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Automating the first and last mile? Reframing the ‘challenges’ of everyday mobilities2023In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we interrogate the utility of conceptualising the ‘first and last mile’ (FLM) as a ‘challenge’ to be addressed through automated and integrated mobility services. We critically engage with the concept through a design anthropological approach which takes two steps so as: to complicate literatures that construct the FLM as a place where automated, service-based and micro-mobility innovations will engender sustainable modal choices above individual automobility; and to demonstrate how people’s situated mobility competencies and values, shape social and material realities and future imaginaries of everyday mobilities. To do so, we draw on ethnographic research into everyday mobility practices, meanings and imaginaries in a suburban neighbourhood in Sweden. We show how locally situated mobilities both challenge the spatial and temporal underpinnings of the first and last mile concept, and resist universalist technology-driven automation narratives. We argue that instead of attempting to bridge gaps in seemingly linear journeys through automated systems, there is a need to account for the practices, tensions and desires embedded in everyday mobilities. © 2023 The Author(s).

  • 4.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Pink, Sarah
    School of Media and Communication/Design Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Capturing the Ordinary: Imagining the User in Designing Automatic Photographic Lifelogging Technologies2016In: Lifelogging: Digital self-tracking and Lifelogging - between disruptive technology and cultural transformation / [ed] Stefan Selke, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we discuss how automatic wearable cameras are imagined by their designers. Such technologies have most often been approached from a user perspective, which overlooks how developers invest their personal experiences and emotions into the technologies. Focusing on the Narrative clip - a camera that takes a photo every 30 seconds, we show how developers its developers have imagined this camera as a device that enables people to gain access to the assumed authenticity of a recordable world, that exists externally to the human wearing the device. As this example shows, when we account for developers’ visions and imaginations, particular stories emerge. Thus, we argue it is important to account for these and the agency they might have in the possibilities created by automated technologies. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016

  • 5.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Brodersen, Meike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Smith, Rachel Charlotte
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Investigating ADM in Shared Mobility: A design ethnographic approach2022In: Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies / [ed] Sarah Pink; Martin Berg; Deborah Lupton; Minna Ruckenstein, London: Routledge, 2022, 1, p. 197-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how a design ethnographic approach to future algorithm-powered mobility solutions opens up possibilities to research social implications of automated decision making (ADM) from a situational perspective, by investigating the context of ADM rather than simply observing the technology itself and how it is used. The context of our discussion is one where the development of autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence (AI) applications, in the service of transportation, has sparked a renewed research interest into shared mobility systems, and how these can respond to emerging challenges of rising traffic congestion and pollution levels. Our research addresses the gap between algorithm-based approaches to designing for optimizing, streamlining, and efficiency, the questions of how these systems and services are activated in people’s everyday life, and how they interfere with decision-making around traveling and shared mobility. We argue that to understand how these services and technologies will be adopted and implemented in society, research attention must be directed to people in real-life situations where this type of ADM operates.

  • 6.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Multisensory Emplaced Learning: Resituating situated learning in a moving world2013In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 170-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines the implications of a theory of "sensory- emplaced learning" for understanding the interrelationships between the embodied and environmental in learning processes. Understanding learning as multisensory and contingent within everyday place-events, this framework analytically describes how people establish themselves as "situated learners." This approach is demonstrated through three examples of how culturally constructed sensory categories offer routes to knowing about the multisensoriality of learning experiences. This approach, we suggest, offers new routes within practice-oriented educational theories for understanding how human bodies become situated and embedded in cultural, social, and material practices within constantly shifting place-events. © 2013 Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition.

  • 7.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Pink, Sarah
    Loughborough University (UK).
    Sensational learning: How sensory experiences give form to places for learning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade academic interest in the senses has increased, indicating what David Howes refers to as a ‘sensual revolution’, a corrective to previous approaches that treat culture as readable text. Following this body of literature, this panel considers the idea of ‘places for learning’ from a perspective that acknowledges the mutlisensoriality of experience. This encompasses not only the directly and more obvious everyday sensoriality of tastes, smells and looks but also, the representations of the senses that saturate magazines, TV and the internet in our highly mediated C21 everyday lives. Studying the multi-sensory and aesthetic dimensions of peoples' learning practices, implies analyzing their actions in terms of experiences of perception – in ways that go beyond a conventional focus on visual perception. Recent ethnographic studies show the importance of sound, smell, taste and touch in how people experience, learn, construct their identities and remember. In this panel we develop these discussions further by exploring how the senses become implicated in contexts where people are engaged in processes of learning. Thus seeking to understand how sensory practices are both implicated in and created in relation to places for learning. In these three presentations we explore the relationship between personal multi-sensorial experiences of looking, tasting and hearing respectively and the collective practices that people engage in when visiting museums, eating and skating.

  • 8.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Pedagogy as Possibility: Health Interventions as Digital Openness2017In: Social Sciences - Socialiniai, ISSN 1392-0758, E-ISSN 2029-7319, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we propose an approach to digital health tracking technologies that draws on design anthropology. This entails re-thinking the pedagogical importance of personal data as lying in how they participate in the constitution of new possibilities that enable people to learn about, and configure, their everyday health in new ways. There have been two dominant strands in traditional debates in the field of pedagogy: one that refers to processes of teaching people to do things in particular ways; and another that seeks to enable learning. The first of these corresponds with existing understandings of self-tracking technologies as either unsuccessful behavioural change devices, or as providing solutions to problems that do not necessarily exist. When seen as such, self-tracking technologies inevitably fail as forms of intervention towards better health. In this article we investigate what happens when we take the second strand—the notion of enabling learning as an incremental and emergent process—seriously as a mode of intervention towards health through self-tracking technologies. We show how such a shift in pedagogical understanding of the routes to knowing these technologies offer creates opportunities to move beyond simplistic ideas of behavioural change as the main application of digital body monitoring in everyday life. In what follows, we first demonstrate how the disjunctures that arise from this context emerge. We then outline a critical response to how learning through life-tracking has been conceptualised in research in health and human-computer interaction research. We offer an alternative response by drawing on a processual theory of learning and recent and emerging research in sociology, media studies, anthropology, and cognate disciplines. Then, drawing on ethnographic research, we argue for understanding learning through the production of personal data as involving emplaced and non-representational routes to knowing. This, we propose, requires a corresponding rethinking of the epistemological status of personal data and what kind of knowledge it can be claimed to produce. Finally, we take up the implications of this and advance the discussion through a design anthropological approach, through which we refigure the interventional potential of such technologies as lying in their capacity to create possibilities for experiential, and often unspoken, ways of embodied and emplaced knowing.

  • 9.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Imagining Personal Data: Experiences of Self-Tracking2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital self-tracking devices and data have become normal elements of everyday life. Imagining Personal Data examines the implications of the rise of body monitoring and digital self-tracking for how we inhabit, experience and imagine our everyday worlds and futures. Through a focus on how it feels to live in environments where data is emergent, present and characterized by a sense of uncertainty, the authors argue for a new interdisciplinary approach to understanding the implications of self-tracking, which attends to its past, present and possible future. Building on social science approaches the book accounts for the concerns of scholars working in design, philosophy and human-computer interaction. It problematizes the body and senses in relation to data and tracking devices, presents an accessible analytical account of the sensory and affective experiences of self-tracking, and questions the status of big data. In doing so, the book proposes an agenda for future research and design that puts people at its centre.

  • 10.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    How do we learn to know a self-driving car?: A pedagogical design anthropology approach to human - technology interaction2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How will autonomous driving (AD) features change how people will relate to, and act in and with cars? To understand these and similar questions, research within human-computer interaction (HCI) is concerned with how people will react and interact with the autonomous driving features while driving a self-driving car, and how these features can be designed to be perceived as both easy to use and useful. In this paper we demonstrate how a pedagogical design anthropological approach can push this agenda further by introducing a way of understanding use of AD that accounts for how technologies become meaningful in the contexts of the mundane everyday life circumstances in which they are actually used. This approach entails understanding use of technology beyond the moment of human-technology interaction, as a process in which experiential ways of knowing take over from rational action, and meaning becomes generated through the ongoing use of technologies in everyday life processes. In the context user experience of AD, this translates into a focus on how people learn to use AD features, and to imagine possible experiences of AD in ways that are situated in the mundane routines of everyday life.

    We will draw on our ethnographic research into everyday life experiences and expectations of AD cars undertaken between 2016-18, to demonstrate how people need these technologies to become part of their everyday lives, and subsequently need to learn to use them in order to accomplish everyday goals.

  • 11.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuncer, Sylvaine
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurier, Eric
    University Of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Vinkhuyzen, Erik
    Nissan Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, United States.
    Strömberg, Helena
    Chalmers University Of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    New mobilities: A workshop on mobility beyond the car2020In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings / [ed] A.H Rizvi; K. Morayko, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 3375169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HCI research on mobility and transport has been dominated by a focus on the automobile. Yet urgent environmental concerns, along with new transport technologies, have created an opportunity for new ways of thinking about how we get from A to B. App-based services, innovations in electric motors, along with changing urban transport patterns, are transforming public transit. Technology is creating new collective transit services, as well as new ways for individuals to move, such as through rental, free-floating e-scooters, so called 'micro-mobility'. This workshop seeks to discuss and establish HCI perspectives on these new mobilities - engaging with and even inventing new modes of transport, fostering collaboration between scholars with varied topical interests around mobility. We seek to bring together a group of industry and academic collaborators, bringing new competences to HCI around the exciting opportunities of redesigning our contemporary mobilities. © 2020 Owner/Author.

  • 12.
    Green, Lelia
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Churchlands, WA, Australia & London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; Griffith University, Nathan, Qld, Australia & Free University, Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Using Digital Interventions to Engage in the Everyday2014In: Media International Australia: Incorporating Culture & Policy, ISSN 1329-878X, E-ISSN 2200-467X, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This themed issue of MIA advances our understanding of how digital media are implicated in processes of change. It interrogates how people engage digital media in creative practices that lead to interventions in their own or others' lives, and explores the intentionalities through which they do this, and the processes and experiences such activities involve. The intention is to bring to the fore the idea of intervening as a way of being active in the world as a scholar, creative practitioner, activist or simply someone living their everyday life in ways that seek to generate forms of change. The articles in this issue address the use of creative interventions for affective and community-constructing ends, examining and highlighting the conscious use of the digital to disrupt and subvert existing patterns in communication and culture, heralding new possibilities while promoting inclusivity and social innovation.

  • 13.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Experiencing Expectations: Extending the Concept of UX Anticipation2018In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Sune Dueholm Müller & Jeppe Agger Nielsen, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 326, p. 1-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates the role of pre-product user experience (UX) in product design. For automotive companies, questions concerning how users will experience not yet available products is pressing - due to an increase in UX design for products, combined with a decrease in time-to-market for new products. Conventional UX research provides insights through investigating specific situated moments during use, or users’ reflections after use, yet cannot provide knowledge about how users will engage with not yet existing products. To understand pre-product UX we undertook a netnographic study of three people’s experiences of expecting and owning a Tesla car. We identified how modes of anticipation evolve before using the actual car, through online social interaction, creating a pre-product experience. The study offers a foundation for theorizing pre-product UX as socially generated anticipated UX, as well as insights for UX design in industry. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018.

  • 14.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. UX Vision, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Pink, Sarah
    Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculties of Information Technology and Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Entangled Intelligent Driving: Relations with Automated Cars2022In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 38, no 17, p. 1607-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As machines become increasingly intelligent, the HCI community is presented with new challenges regarding methods to capture and understand user experience (UX). In the case of autonomous driving (AD), this involves new scenarios where humans and intelligent vehicles need to act together in real-life traffic situations with other road users. This article responds to this context by 1) outlining a longitudinal design ethnography method whereby participants drove semiautonomous cars in their everyday environments to capture such human-machine relations in real-life settings, 2) demonstrating the complexities of the relations between humans and AD vehicles, 3) engaging theories of socio-materiality and entanglement to understand the human-machine relations of AD cars, and 4) identifying anticipatory experiences that emerge from these relations and their implications for informing UX design. © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 15.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Experiencing the Future Car: Anticipatory UX as a Social and Digital Phenomenon2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 31, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to be innovative and competitive, the automotive industry seeks to understand how to attract new customers, even before they have experienced the product. User Experience (UX) research often provides insights into situated uses of products, and reflections after their use, however tells us little about how products and services are experienced before use. We propose anticipation theory as a way to understand how shared experiences between people in an online discussion forum relate to UX of cars before they are actually experienced in real-life. We took an ethnographic approach to analyse the activities of members of a self-organised web-based discussion forum for Tesla car enthusiasts, to understand how product anticipation emerges in a digital-material setting. Our study identifies how anticipatory experiences create UX of car ownership which evolves through members’ engagement in a self-organised online community enabled through the digitalisation and connectivity of the car, and how such car experiences generate new forms of digital anticipation of the car. We conclude that the shift towards digitalisation of cars and subscription services creates a need for more interdisciplinary research into spatial and temporal aspects, where socially shared anticipatory experiences are increasingly important for the overall UX. © Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems,.

  • 16.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University Melbourne, Australia.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University Malmö, Sweden.
    On the way to anticipated car UX2018In: NordiCHI'18: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, New York: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 494-504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional User Experience (UX) research provides insights into situated uses of products, or reflections after their use, but tells us little about how products are experienced before use. In this article we demonstrate how people's engagement in web-based discussion forums creates ways through which they can experience products before they have actually used them, and reflect on the implications of this for UX research. To understand how product anticipation emerges in a digital-material setting we undertook an ethnographic analysis of members' contributions to http://www.teslaclubsweden.se, a web-based discussion forum that connects Tesla car enthusiasts. Anticipation developed as a shared endeavour that evolved through five ways which forum members engaged and participated in their community of practice. Through their online interactions their UX evolved before using the actual car. Our findings provide deeper understandings of anticipatory UX, and insights for UX design in HCI. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery

  • 17.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anticipatory experience in everyday autonomous driving2020In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 24, p. 747-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss how people’s user experience (UX) of autonomous driving (AD) cars can be understood as a shifting anticipatory experience, as people experience degrees of AD through evolving advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) in their everyday context.We draw on our ethnographic studies of five families, who had access to AD research cars with evolving ADAS features in their everyday lives for a duration of 1ó years. Our analysis shows that people gradually adopt AD cars, through a process that involves anticipating if they can trust them, what the ADAS features will do and what the longer-term technological possibilities will be. It also showed that this anticipatory UX occurs within specific socio-technical and environmental circumstances, which could not be captured easily in experimental settings. The implication is that studying anticipation offers us new insights into how people adopt AD in their everyday commute driving. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 18.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, UX Vision, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Faculty of Information Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Fore-sighting autonomous driving - An Ethnographic approach2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 173, article id 121105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of Human-Computer-Interaction research and the automotive industry has identified that un- derstanding user needs and creating positive user experience (UX) is crucial in order to successfully introduce Autonomous Driving (AD) vehicles to the market. AD research is commonly undertaken to provide user insights by studying the individual-technology experiences in lab settings or by forecasting attitudes and acceptability through large surveys. However, these approaches base their knowledge on people’s past or present expectations and limited real life experiences of AD. To better understand upcoming individual user needs and to enable new innovations beyond acceptability forecasts and UX lab tests, we need to identify new concepts through alter- native methodologies that can generate user foresights based on users’ evolving anticipations of AD in their everyday lives. We propose an ethnographic approach with iterative speculative scenarios, which we demon- strate through a study undertaken with participants from five families who were introduced to evolving levels of AD, in real-life situations. To demonstrate the methodology, we draw on empirical findings which reveal anticipatory experiences, which we abstract through the concepts of confidence, hope and being-in-the-moment. We show how these concepts structured our user foresights, and outline the implications of engaging them in innovation processes.

  • 19.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Long, Vicky
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Cooney, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Duarte, Eduardo K.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Aksoy, Eren Erdal
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Vinel, Alexey
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Dougherty, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Smaller is smarter: A case for small to medium-sized smart cities2022In: Journal of Smart Cities and Society, ISSN 2772-3577, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 95-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart Cities have been around as a concept for quite some time. However, most examples of Smart Cities (SCs) originate from megacities (MCs), despite the fact that most people live in Small and Medium-sized Cities (SMCs). This paper addresses the contextual setting for smart cities from the perspective of such small and medium-sized cities. It starts with an overview of the current trends in the research and development of SCs, highlighting the current bias and the challenges it brings. We follow with a few concrete examples of projects which introduced some form of “smartness” in the small and medium cities context, explaining what influence said context had and what specific effects did it lead to. Building on those experiences, we summarise the current understanding of Smart Cities, with a focus on its multi-faceted (e.g., smart economy, smart people, smart governance, smart mobility, smart environment and smart living) nature; we describe mainstream publications and highlight the bias towards large and very large cities (sometimes even subconscious); give examples of (often implicit) assumptions deriving from this bias; finally, we define the need of contextualising SCs also for small and medium-sized cities. The aim of this paper is to establish and strengthen the discourse on the need for SMCs perspective in Smart Cities literature. We hope to provide an initial formulation of the problem, mainly focusing on the unique needs and the specific requirements. We expect that the three example cases describing the effects of applying new solutions and studying SC on small and medium-sized cities, together with the lessons learnt from these experiences, will encourage more research to consider SMCs perspective. To this end, the current paper aims to justify the need for this under-studied perspective, as well as to propose interesting challenges faced by SMCs that can serve as initial directions of such research.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 20.
    Osz, Katalin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash university, Melbourne, Australia.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Combining WOz testing and ride along video ethnographies: advancing methodologies for Autonomous Driving car development for mixed traffic environments2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Australian Conference on Computer-Human Interaction, New York: ACM Press, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental ‘Wizard of Oz’ (WOz) User Experience (UX) research in the context of Autonomous Driving (AD) car development is becoming more interdisciplinary, human-centric and open to innovative methodological collaborations. In this paper, we demonstrate a mixed-methodological approach to research how people engage with and make sense of automated features that do not yet exist in everyday life contexts. We present how the combination of WOz testing and ethnographic ride-alongs have been developed and how the two different approaches can benefit from each other. We selected two everyday driving examples - emerging from T-junction and changing lane on the motorway - to demonstrate the value of mixing these methodologies. We propose that by building new collaborative test practices, we can create a more everyday-life oriented approach that better attends to people’s experiences, imaginaries and projections into possible futures of driving, which is particularly important to incorporate in AD vehicle design for mixed traffic environments.

  • 21.
    Osz, Katalin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydström, Annie
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Informat Technology, Monash Art Design & Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Broström, Robert
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Building Collaborative Test Practices: Design Ethnography and WOz in Autonomous Driving Research2018In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 37, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a novel way of performing experimental "Wizard of Oz" (WOz) User Experience (UX) research that specifically targets driving in different levels of self-driving modes. The reasons for exploring the possibilities of combining experimental and ethnographic WOz-testing have been twofold. On the one hand, this mixed-method approach responds to a growing body of critique concerning how the WOz test is biased by the claim that it explores real-life behaviour in an experimental setting. On the other hand, our approach also meets the demands for innovative research methodologies that can contribute to deeper understandings of how to better evaluate and account for human expectations and experiences when automated technologies become integrated in everyday life contexts. This knowledge is inevitable for a broader understanding of the overall user experience and expectations of autonomous driving and, more specifically, building an interdisciplinary collaborative testing approach.

  • 22.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculty of Information Technology, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Digital futures anthropology2021In: Digital Anthropology / [ed] Haidy Geismar; Hannah Knox, Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, 2, p. 307-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New digital, automated and intelligent technologies and services – including self-driving cars, drones, smart home technologies, digital health applications and more – are becoming increasingly possible, available and integrated into everyday circumstances and imagined near and far futures. Investigating digital futures moreover demands research methods that surpass the conventional anthropological tendency to take refuge in the epistemological and ethical past. The term digital futures has the obvious connotation of being concerned with the roles played by technologies in a time that has not yet happened and is used across many contemporary contexts. Autonomous driving (AD) cars are a pertinent example of a technology in development. AD futures research therefore enabled our team to better understand – theoretically and ethnographically – how people imagined and experienced possible digital futures scenarios and how and why they began to feel confident and comfortable in these situations and when they did not.

  • 23.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Situating everyday life: Practices and places2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of everyday life is fundamental to our understanding of modern society. This book provides a coherent, interdisciplinary way to engage with everyday activities and environments. Arguing for an innovative, ethnographic approach, it uses detailed examples, based in real world and digital research, to bring its theories to life. Sarah Pink focuses on the sensory, embodied, mobile, and mediated elements of practice and place as a route to understanding wider issues. By doing so, she convincingly outlines a robust theoretical and methodological approach to understanding contemporary everyday life and activism. © Sarah Pink 2012.

  • 24.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Abram, Simone
    University of Durham, United Kingdom.
    Media, anthropology and public engagement2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary anthropology is done in a world where social and digital media are playing an increasingly significant role, where anthropological and arts practices are often intertwined in museum and public intervention contexts, and where anthropologists are encouraged to engage with mass media. Because anthropologists are often expected and inspired to ensure their work engages with public issues, these opportunities to disseminate work in new ways and to new publics simultaneously create challenges as anthropologists move their practice into unfamiliar collaborative domains and expose their research to new forms of scrutiny. In this volume, contributors question whether a fresh public anthropology is emerging through these new practices. © 2015 Sarah Pink and Simone Abram. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Being in a mediated world: self-tracking and the mind–body–environment2017In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 375-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-tracking is an increasingly ubiquitous everyday activity and therefore is becoming implicated in the ways that everyday environments are experienced and configured. In this article, we examine theoretically and ethnographically how the digital materiality of these technologies mediates and participates in the constitution of people’s tacit ways of being in the world. We argue that accounting for the presence of such technologies as part of everyday environments in this way offers new insights for non-representational accounts of everyday life as developed in geography and anthropology and advances existing understandings of these technologies as it has emerged in sociology and media studies.

  • 26.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Ethnography, Stakeholders, and Audiences: Toward Openness and Inclusivity2017In: Sociological Research Online, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 169-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environments in which ethnography is currently being played out are in many ways shifting as part of a world where academic research is increasingly implicated in applied and public scholarship and practice. This calls not simply for new ways of applying ethnographic insights to societal, industry, and policy problems but, we argue, for a reconfiguration of how we understand the possibilities, potentials, and impacts of ethnographic practice when situated as part of a world in progress. It invites us to revise how we understand ethnographic processes, practices, and ethics as they are played out with and through different sets of stakeholders, beyond researchers, participants, and the academic communities of critics (Strathern, 2006) who were their traditional audiences. This new context, we argue, takes us beyond past iterations of applied ethnography because there is a more widespread and institutionally driven aim to seek to do ethnographic work that has impact and may intervene in the world. This new institutionally endorsed and indeed encouraged way of practicing as an ethnographer and scholar brings new configurations and considerations to our profession. It makes partnering with industry or with creative practitioners unsurprising, yet at the same time potentially challenging. This Special Section represents our interest in exploring how this new and emerging context might be conceptualized and how it might be played out through responsible and ethical ways of conducting ethnographic research and forms of intervention in contemporary worlds. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 27.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australien.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Samverkansetik2018In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin Berg, Vaike Fors, Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 69-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Self-tracking and mobile media: New digital materialities2017In: Mobile Media & Communication, ISSN 2050-1579, E-ISSN 2050-1587, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 219-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we take the novel step of bringing together recent scholarship about mobile media and communications with new ethnographic research and scholarship about mobile self-tracking. The correspondences and entanglements between mobile media and self-tracking technologies, and scholarship, we argue, are usefully considered in relation to each other both empirically and theoretically. Indeed, we propose that the convergence between self-tracking and mobile media means that we will increasingly need to account for their entanglements in mobile media research, and that there is therefore a need to explore the implications of taking the new step of approaching self-tracking research through the prism of mobile media scholarship. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 29.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Sensory, Digital and Visual Methodologies2017In: Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies / [ed] Michael L. Silk, David L. Andrews & Holly Thorpe, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 528-536Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Glöss, Mareike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Automated futures and the mobile present: In-car video ethnographies2019In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 88-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technological possibilities associated with autonomous driving (AD) cars are generating new questions and imaginaries about automated futures. In this article we advance a theoretical-methodological approach towards researching this context based in design anthropological theory and sensory ethnographic practice. In doing so we explain and discuss the findings of an in-car video ethnography study designed to investigate the usually unspoken and not necessarily visible elements of car-based mobility. Such an approach is needed, we argue, both in order to inform a research agenda that is capable of addressing the emergence of automated vehicles specifically, as well as in preparation for understanding the implications of automation more generally as human mobility is increasingly entangled with automated technologies and the future imaginaries associated with them. © The British Association of Hand Therapists Ltd 2017.

  • 31.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Glöss, Mareike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    The contingent futures of the mobile present: automation as possibility2018In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 615-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we outline and demonstrate a design anthropological approach to investigating automated mobile futures as a processual opening up of possibilities, rather than as a process of technological innovation. To undertake this we investigate the example of how the car-smartphone relationship is configuring in the contingent circumstances of the mobile present and the implications of this for automated mobile futures. Our discussion is set in the context of the growing possibility that automonous driving (AD) features are increasingly part of everyday mobilities (even if unequally distributed globally) and in which personal mobile smart technologies and artificial intelligence (AI) will exist in some form and will interface with humans and be interoperable with other technologies. In developing this we draw on ethnographic understandings of how people live with the possibilities afforded by technologies in everyday life. © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 32.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Lanzeni, Deborah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Duque, Melisa
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Strengers, Yolande
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Design Ethnography: Research, Responsibilities, and Futures2022Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book roots the bringing together of ethnography and design firmly in social science theory, showing readers how to best use theory in design ethnography and how to develop a coherent relationship between research and practice. It promotes interdisciplinarity and collaboration, and takes design ethnography beyond the content of the 'project' to ask how it contributes to a wider agenda for a better world and the creation of ethical and responsible futures.

  • 33.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Emerging technologies and anticipatory images: Uncertain ways of knowing with automated and connected mobilities2018In: Philosophy of Photography, ISSN 2040-3682, E-ISSN 2040-3690, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 195-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we outline two different ways of ‘seeing’ autonomous driving (AD) cars. The first corresponds with the technological innovation narrative, published in online industry, policy, business and other news contexts, that pitches AD cars as the solution to societal problems, and urges users to trust and accept them so that such benefits can be accrued. The second is a narrative of everyday improvisation, which was visualized through our video ethnography and participant mapping exercises. Our research, undertaken in Sweden, involved possible future everyday users of AD cars. We argue for a research and intervention agenda that examines how the visual narration of how AD cars might participate in human futures, could be shifted to create new modes of trust and reassurance for publics. 

  • 34.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, VaikeHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).O'Dell, TomHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Lutz, Peter
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Smith, Rachel Charlotte
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Future Mobility Solutions?2022In: An Anthropology of Futures and Technologies / [ed] D. Lanzeni; K. Waltrop; S. Pink; R.C. Smith, Oxford: Routledge, 2022, p. 138-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter outlines and demonstrates a collaborative and interventional design anthropology of emerging technologies, through the example of autonomous driving (AD) cars. AD cars have been framed as solutions to everyday problems within proposals for platform-based future automated mobility systems. However when reframed through the lens of everyday local mobilities these industry driven future visions are revealed to be misaligned with the real priorities of people’s everyday lives. Thus showing how  revealing how the everyday present complicates dominant futures narratives. However, we emphasise that rather than stopping at this critique, we should productively collaboratively engage with city and automotive stakeholders in this field in pedagogies of mutual learning, experimentation, and creativity. To develop our discussion we draw on ongoing conceptualisation and research undertaken over a period of over six years.

  • 36.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Leder Mackley, Kerstin
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Flow and intervention in everyday life: Situating practices2015In: Social practices, intervention and sustainability: Beyond behaviour change / [ed] Yolande Strengers & Cecily Maller, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2015, p. 163-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Introduction: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: Opportunities and Challenges of Working in the In-between2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 3-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculties of Information Technology and Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Osz, Katalin
    Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Design anthropology for emerging technologies: Trust and sharing in autonomous driving futures2020In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 69, article id 100942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we demonstrate how design anthropology theory, methodology and practice can be mobilised to create interventions in how possible human futures with emerging technologies are understood and imagined. Drawing on our research into Human Experience and Expectations of Autonomous Driving (AD) cars we show how: we engaged ethnographic insights to redefine concepts of trust and sharing which contest dominant problem-solution narratives; and we mobilised these insights in applied contexts, through our AD Futures cards which employ ethnographic quotes and examples to disrupt common assumptions, align stakeholders with everyday experience, and pose new questions. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    An Interventional Design Anthropology of Emerging Technologies: Working Through an Interdisciplinary Field2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of the Anthropology of Technology / [ed] Maja Hojer Bruun, Ayo Wahlberg, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Cathrine Hasse, Klaus Hoeyer, Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, Brit Ross Winthereik, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 183-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging technologies—such as autonomous driving (AD) cars, blockchain, robotics, and drones—are increasingly part of popular narratives and industry and policy agendas. They are commonly understood as new digital, data-driven, intelligent, or automated technological innovations in development, or at the cusp of being launched into a market. Thus, the anthropological question of how they might become part of everyday, experiential, possible worlds demands our attention. In this chapter we outline an approach to emerging technologies that is rooted in design anthropology and takes an interventional stance. In doing so we situated design anthropology of emerging technologies within an interdisciplinary field which has tended to be dominated by technologically determinist approaches. Through the example of the notion of trust in AD cars, we show how policy, industry, engineering, and social science approaches configure to provide different and critical understandings. Drawing on our own design ethnographic research, we show how design anthropological attention to people offers an alternative and viable mode of understanding how emerging technologies become part of emerging worlds. © 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

  • 40.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Ruckenstein, Minna
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Willim, Robert
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Duque, Melisa
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Broken data: Conceptualising data in an emerging world2018In: Big Data and Society, ISSN 2053-9517, E-ISSN 2053-9517, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we introduce and demonstrate the concept-metaphor of broken data. In doing so, we advance critical discussions of digital data by accounting for how data might be in processes of decay, making, repair, re-making and growth, which are inextricable from the ongoing forms of creativity that stem from everyday contingencies and improvisatory human activity. We build and demonstrate our argument through three examples drawn from mundane everyday activity: the incompleteness, inaccuracy and dispersed nature of personal self-tracking data; the data cleaning and repair processes of Big Data analysis and how data can turn into noise and vice versa when they are transduced into sound within practices of music production and sound art. This, we argue is a necessary step for considering the meaning and implications of data as it is increasingly mobilised in ways that impact society and our everyday worlds.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Caulfield East, Australia.
    Smith, Rachel Charlotte
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Lund, Jesper
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Torslanda, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Torslanda, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Torslanda, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Broström, Robert
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Torslanda, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mobility as a Service Through Design: A Human Approach2021In: Advancing a Design Approach to Enriching Public Mobility / [ed] S. Coxon; R. Napper, Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2021, 1, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explains how designing for future intelligent mobility systems is advanced by a human-centered approach, based in design anthropology. It provides an accessible introduction the theory and methodology of this approach, the production of ethnographic insights, and their translation into design probes for use workshops tailored to enable stakeholders to actively co-design future mobility and autonomous vehicle services and outlines the potentials and challenges of engaging diverse stakeholders—from industry and policy to the people who will use future technologies and services—in the development of future mobility. © 2021, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 42.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The lit world: living with everyday urban automation2018In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 833-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we develop and advance the concept of the lit world by bringing together literatures about everyday lighting, automation in everyday life and human perception, along with our ethnographic research into people’s experience of automated lighting in Melbourne, Australia. In doing so we formulate and argue for an approach to automation that situates it as part of everyday mundane worlds and acknowledges its entanglement with the emergent and experiential qualities of everyday environments as they unfold. We demonstrate this through the example of automated lighting, understood as a situated technology that has contingent effects and participates in the making of particular ways of seeing and feeling the world. We thereby argue for an account of automation that reaches beyond its potential for the management of human (and other) behaviour, to ask how the qualities and affordances of automated technologies might seep out of their intended domains, and create new perceptual and experiential opportunities. In a context where automation is increasingly prevalent in everyday life, such attention to the experience and use of automated technologies which already exist on a large scale is needed. Urban lighting is an example par excellence of automation in the world because it has a long history beyond the recent association of automated technologies with code and digital infrastructures. As scholars debate how automated technologies will become part of our future digital lives, understanding how people live in a lit world offers a starting point for considering how we might live with other anticipated algorithmic forms of automation. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 43.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Lupton, Deborah
    University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Heyes La Bond, Christine
    University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Mundane data: The routines, contingencies and accomplishments of digital living2017In: Big Data and Society, ISSN 2053-9517, E-ISSN 2053-9517, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article develops and mobilises the concept of 'mundane data' as an analytical entry point for understanding Big Data. We call for in-depth investigation of the human experiences, routines, improvisations and accomplishments which implicate digital data in the flow of the everyday. We demonstrate the value of this approach through a discussion of our ethnographic research with self-tracking cycling commuters. We argue that such investigations are crucial in informing our understandings of how digital data become meaningful in mundane contexts of everyday life for two reasons: first because there is a gap in our understanding of the contingencies and specificities through which big digital data sets are produced, and second because designers and policy makers often seek to make interventions for change in everyday contexts through the presentation of mundane data to consumers but with little understanding of how people produce, experience and engage with these data.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Raats, Kaspar
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Trusting autonomous vehicles: An interdisciplinary approach2020In: Transport Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, ISSN 2590-1982, Vol. 7, article id 100201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical concept of trust has been identified as highly important to the successful design of intelligent technologies such as autonomous vehicles (AVs). In human-centred transport research this has resulted in a focus on trust in the technical design of future AVs and has raised the question of how the conditions that form trust change as technologies become more intelligent. In this article we discuss the first stage of an interdisciplinary project that brought together ethnographic and experimental user studies into trust in intelligent cars. This stage focused on the development of an interdisciplinary methodological framework for the user studies, through a review of 258 empirical HCI research articles on trust in automation and AVs. The review investigated the following research questions: a) what are the key themes in HCI methodologies used to research trust in automation and AVs; b) how do they account for trust in AVs as part of wider contexts; and c) how can these methodologies be developed to include more than momentary and individual human-machine interactions. We found that while theoretical understandings of trust in automated technologies acknowledge the relevance of the wider context in which the interaction occurs, existing methodologies predominantly involve experimental studies in simulated environments with a focus on reliance related aspects of trust. We identified that ethnographic user studies can potentially contribute to new connections between theoretical understandings and conventional experimental methods. Therefore, we propose a framework for an interdisciplinary approach that combines experimental and ethnographic methodologies to investigate trust in AVs. © 2020 The Authors

  • 45.
    Raats, Kaspar
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Understanding Trust in Automated Vehicles2019In: OZCHI'19: Proceedings of the 31st Australian Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction, New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 352-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are developed to increase safety, and bring environmental benefits. Nevertheless, there is growing skepticism in society regarding these technologies, a tendency that centres issues of trust in research and design of future AVs. In this paper, we raise the question of how trust has been understood and researched in relation to automation within the field of HumanComputer Interaction (HCI) thus far and what has been identified as key issues to deepen our understanding of personal trust in contemporary AVs. To answer this question, we systematically reviewed 232 HCI research articles on trust in automation and AVs to identify a) key aspects of contemporary trust research theories and methodologies, and b) what dimensions of trust are in need of further investigation in relation to UX perspectives on trust. Based on the review, we discuss methodological implications of focusing on the experience of trust in future research. © 2019 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 46.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    et al.
    RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Lupton, Deborah
    University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia.
    LaBond, Christine Heyes
    University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia.
    The affective intensities of datafied space2016In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 21, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of datafication - which refers to the idea that many aspects of life can be rendered into digital data which can subsequently be analysed and used to understand, predict and guide interventions in society - has been both enthusiastically engaged with and critically deconstructed in recent literatures. In this article, we explore the relevance of datification for understanding the spatiality of everyday life. In doing so, we argue for a refigured concept of datafication through theoretical and empirical scholarship focused on affect. We suggest that a renewed concept of datafication - that is, of datafied space - offers a framework for how we dwell in and move through a world where digital data about humans have an increasing presence. To make our arguments, we offer an account of a recent study of cycle-commuting and self-tracking in Melbourne and Canberra, Australia. We used helmet-mounted action cameras and video interviews in a 'digital sensory ethnography' to explore the entanglement of bodies, bicycles, digital devices, data and affect that shape how people move through and make sense of what we call 'datafied space'. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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