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  • 1.
    Batory, Agnes
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Regulating Collaboration: The Legal Framework of Collaborative Governance in Ten European Countries2019Ingår i: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many scholars have considered when and why collaboration between government agencies and societal actors occurs. This article argues that a simple but largely overlooked answer to these questions is that a formal legal or administrative requirement to do so is in place. Therefore, the objective is to substantiate whether there are legal requirements to collaborate and in what type of source and context this obligation applies in ten European countries. The main finding is that collaboration is underpinned by an extensive range of legal requirements in Europe, although imposing these requirements is generally not the main objective. © 2019 The Author(s).

  • 2.
    Demidov, Andrey
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Local cross-border cooperation at the European Union's external border: The meaning of local in the European Neighbourhood Policy2013Ingår i: Regions and Cohesion, ISSN 2152-906X, E-ISSN 2152-9078, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 22-46Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines a key priority in European Union policy toward the east and south: the effort to turn the external border areas into secure, stable, and prospering regions via support for cross-border cooperation. This features highly in a range of policies brought together under the European Neighbourhood Policy and in the partnership with Russia. The main question asked by the article is if these policies live up to the goal of involving local actors. Based on a content analysis of pro- gram documents and a categorization of project partners by actor type, the article argues that the notion of “local” can be subject to various un- derstandings, but if we understand local versus regional along the lines of the European Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) classification, the policy in practice is undoubtedly tilted toward regional rather than local cross-border cooperation. In addition, the article argues that the four objectives of the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument-Cross Border Cooperation (ENPI-CBC) do not match what could realistically be achieved with the resources available. © 2019 Berghahn Books

  • 3.
    Eschweiler, Jennifer
    et al.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Svensson, Sara
    Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Mocca, Elisabetta
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Cartwright, Andrew
    Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Villadsen Nielsen, Louise
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    The Reciprocity Dimension of Solidarity: Insights from Three European Countries2019Ingår i: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 549-561Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that closer attention to how solidarity is understood and expressed in different European contexts can shed light on the conditions for establishing a social and solidarity economy. Drawing on data collected within the H2020 SOLIDUS project, which explores current expressions of European solidarity, the comparative analysis covers three social economy initiatives, each representing a country with different political and economic context. The analysis focuses on solidarity as reciprocity and, in particular, how it is affected by such factors as actor motivations, internal participatory functioning, resource mix and political legitimacy. While further empirical work is needed, the findings suggest that solidarity as reciprocity produced by social and solidarity economy organisations thrives where political institutions are both supportive and trusted, where public funding is accessible, and where partnerships with relatively autonomous social and solidarity economy organisations are genuinely collaborative. © 2019, The Author(s).

  • 4.
    Irion, Kristina
    et al.
    Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Delinavelli, Giacomo
    Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Coutinho, Mariana Francese
    Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Fathaigh, Ronan Ó
    Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Jusić, Tarik
    Center for Social Research Analitika, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina & University of New York in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Klimkiewicz, Beata
    Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland.
    Llorens, Carles
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rozgonyi, Krisztina
    University of Vienna, Wien, Austria.
    Svensson, Sara
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Smokvina, Tanja Kerševan
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    van Til, Gijs
    Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    The independence of media regulatory authorities in Europe2019Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This IRIS Special focuses on the independence of regulatory authorities and bodies in the broadcasting and audiovisual media sector in Europe. These entities have proliferated according to the different legal traditions of the respective countries they belong to. They do not, therefore, conform one, single model. Nonetheless, they reflect a common approach of sorts with regard to the institutional set-up of regulatory governance. The independence of these entities is particularly important because it contributes to the broader objective of media independence, which is in itself an essential component of democracy.

    The creation, status and functioning of these regulatory authorities and bodies were shaped pursuant to the constitutional requirements and/or administrative practices of the countries that established them. As a result, each has distinct characteristics and levels of independence that differ according to where they are located. But when is an authority to be considered independent? The measurement of an entity's independence requires careful analysis of the legal texts setting it up, but also of the practices that are rooted in reality and reflect the sensitivities of the societies in question.

    This IRIS Special aims to enlighten the reader on the definition of the independence of a regulatory authority or body, on the criteria used to assess its independence, and on the legal framework embodying this independence at the European level, as well as provide analysis of the status and functioning of regulatory authorities and bodies in a selection of nine European countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Spain, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, and Slovenia. This sample reflects the different levels of independence that can be found across Europe. © European Audiovisual Observatory (Council of Europe), Strasbourg, September 2019

  • 5.
    Medve-Bálint, Gergő
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Diversity and Development: Policy Entrepreneurship of Euroregional Initiatives in Central and Eastern Europe2013Ingår i: Journal of Borderlands Studies, ISSN 0886-5655, E-ISSN 2159-1229, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 15-31Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article builds on the authors' research into the formation of Euroregions in Central and Eastern Europe, addressing questions that may also be relevant on a broader European scale. Based on our empirical findings, in previous research we demonstrated why some local governments join Euroregions while others abstain. This article takes a further step and aims to discuss what happens once local governments become involved in them. How do motivations and expectations of local governments, as well as the power asymmetries between them, determine the capacity of these small-scale local cross-border collaborative initiatives to act as policy entrepreneurs? We take the three different Euroregional initiatives present in the Komárom–Esztergom region at the Hungarian–Slovakian border as illustrative examples. The empirical data were collected through personal interviews with the representatives of the Euroregions and with the highest political representatives of all local governments that are members on the Hungarian side. We find that differences in membership structure and in the motivational background influence their capacity to act as policy entrepreneurs operationalized as organizational development, diversification of resource base and appropriation of cross-border cooperation activities. We thus rely on a modified version of Markus Perkmann's theoretical framework built around the concept of policy entrepreneurship, but apply it to cases where we are able to control for variations in underlying macro-level conditions, such as politico-administrative or ethno-linguistic settings. The paper, therefore, highlights the differences in the internal dynamics of these initiatives and also challenges the perception of Euroregions as homogeneous institutions. © 2013 Copyright Association for Borderlands Studies.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Sara
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Department of Public Policy, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Cross-Border Regions in Policy Networks: The EGTC as a Tool of Interest Representation2014Ingår i: Functional and More?: New Potential for the European Grouping of Territorial Cooperation - EGTC / [ed] Alice Engl and Carolin Zwilling, Bolzano: EURAC , 2014, s. 83-98Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Euroregions: Institutional transfer and reinterpreted norms in Central and Eastern Europe2018Ingår i: Policy Experiments, Failures and Innovations: Beyond Accession in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Agnes Batory, Andrew Cartwright & Diane Stone, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, 1, s. 131-151Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of institution that appeared in post-communist Europe in the 1990s was the “Euroregion,” an association between local or regional authorities located close to a national border in two or more European countries. Most Euroregions in Central and Eastern Europe were modeled closely upon Western European examples, but the chapter argues that the motivations of the stakeholders at national and local government levels have become more important for the understanding and impact of these institutions than the original policy ideas behind the transferred institution, potentially leading to counter-productive effects in certain areas, such as the creation of nationality-transcending European identities. Whether the transfer (and translation) of this particular institution is judged as “failure,” “conflicted success” or “precarious success” is to some degree “in the eye of the beholder,” whether that be a transnational actor or a local agent.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Sara
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Forget the policy gap: why local governments really decide to take part in cross-border cooperation initiatives in Europe2013Ingår i: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 54, nr 4, s. 409-422Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the motivations of European local governments to join formalized cooperation initiatives between sub-national authorities, referred to as Euroregions. Micro-level comparative empirical data are brought forward to argue against the European Union portrayal of Euroregions as primarily responding to local or regional policy problems that cannot be dealt with within the national contexts, expressed as filling the gaps. Instead, the paper contends that local government engagement mainly derives from normative beliefs, and when instrumental expectations appear, they are grant-driven rather than policy-driven. The empirical data consist of material generated by 136 interviews with mayors of local governments in six Euroregions, located at three national borders (Sweden/Norway, Hungary/Slovakia and Austria/Germany). Qualitative data from these interviews are used to investigate assumptions, beliefs, and practices underpinning Euroregional membership. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  • 9.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Health policy in cross-border cooperation practices: the role of Euroregions and their local government members2017Ingår i: Territory, Politics, Governance, ISSN 2162-2671, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 47-64Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Health Policy in Cross-border Cooperation Practices: The Role of Euroregions and Their Local Government Members. Territory, Politics, Governance. The support for local cross-border cooperation in Europe has been built on the premises of new cross-border institutions (Euroregions) as primarily responding to policy problems that cannot be dealt with effectively within the national contexts, expressed as ‘filling the gaps’. One area with significant gains to be made by cooperating across borders is health policy. This article discusses the extent to which health policy has (not) become an activity in cross-border practices, and what the potential is for Euroregions to facilitate this. The article first relies on previous research in combination with a mapping exercise of 53 current structures to demonstrate that despite well-advertised ‘best practices’, the overall level of health cooperation is relatively low. It then looks into the motivations for cooperation and policy priorities of participating local governments. The empirical data consist of interviews with mayors of local governments in six Euroregions, located at three national borders (Sweden–Norway, Hungary–Slovakia and Austria–Germany). The analysis points to attitudes related to frustration, a sense of institutional inappropriateness and cognitive distances playing a role in the low salience of health policy. The article therefore argues that cooperation in the health area will derive from policy activity from other actors than Euroregions. © 2016 Regional Studies Association.

  • 10.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Samhällsbyggande över gränsen: Gränsöverskridande regioner som policyide och forskningsfält2013Ingår i: Det regionala samhällsbyggandets praktiker: Tiden, Makten, Rummet / [ed] Tomas Mitander, Line Säll & Andreas Öjehag-Pettersson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2013, s. 223-234Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    The Bordered World of Cross-border Cooperation: The Determinants of Local Government Contact Networks within Euroregions2015Ingår i: Regional & Federal Studies, ISSN 1359-7566, E-ISSN 1743-9434, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 277-295Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the determinants of local government contact networks within cross-border cooperation organizations (Euroregions). Relying on social capital theory, a combination of social network and qualitative analytical tools are applied on data from two Scandinavian and two East Central European cases. The analysis reveals that, even in favourable circumstances, contact networks are thin and Euroregions fail to develop into truly integrated political spaces. The analysis also shows that contact patterns on one side of the border, determined primarily by inter-municipal cooperation, will matter for how contact networks are formed across the border. The findings are important, as membership in a Euroregion is expected to foster cross-border political relationships that could have possible spillover effects in terms of encouraging policy cooperation outside the framework of the Euroregion, which in turn would enhance the likelihood of well-functioning cross-border governance spaces. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  • 12.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Center for Policy Studies, Central European University (CEU), Budapest, Hungary.
    Balogh, Péter
    Institute for Regional Studies, CERS, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA), Budapest, Hungary.
    Limits to Integration: Persisting Border Obstacles in the EU2018Ingår i: European Territorial Cooperation: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Process and Impacts of Cross-Border and Transnational Cooperation in Europe / [ed] Eduardo Medeiros, Cham: Springer, 2018, s. 115-134Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the various ways in which borders act as barriers and obstacles in the European Union, and why borders maintain this function even in a context of openness. While most formal barriers to the mobility of goods, capital, services, and labour (i.e. the “four freedoms”) have by now been removed within the European Union, the effects of borders persist. For people living close to borders, these function as obstacles that are related to communication and infrastructure, legal and administrative differences, as well as language and culture. Opinion polls and consultations with European stakeholders witness the importance of addressing regulatory (legal and administrative) obstacles, especially in the fields of labour and education, while language is an important obstacle where more could be done. The chapter finishes with policy recommendations to practitioners seeking to conduct and/or improve systematic policy work to remove border obstacles for enhanced territorial cohesion and regional development. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018.

  • 13.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Batory, Agnes
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    The Use and Abuse of Participatory Governance by Populist Governments2019Ingår i: Policy and politics (Print), ISSN 0305-5736, E-ISSN 1470-8442, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 227-244Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Populists claim that they alone represent the voice of the people against a corrupt elite. We argue that populist governments augment this claim by appropriating and manipulating the language and methods of participatory governance. Advancing an analytical framework on content, process, effect, resource efficiency and communication dimensions, we illustrate these arguments with the National Consultations in Hungary in 2010–18. Our conclusion for the case study is that these exercises were deeply flawed for securing popular input into policy-making. The implication for scholarship is that participatory governance enthusiasts need to be more aware not just of the uses, but also the abuses, of public input, while scholars of populism should pay more attention to the actual policies and practices populist actors employ to gain or maintain power.

  • 14.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Cartwright, Andrew
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Challenges to participatory governance in solidarity initiatives and social enterprises: the case of Hungary2018Ingår i: 3rd EMES-Polanyi International Seminar: Welfare societies in transition, 2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    As echoed in the Call for Papers to this conference, the literature on solidarity economy and social enterprises has emphasized the importance of more dialogue between the global ‘North’ and global ‘South’ on practices and knowledge related to solidarity economy, social innovation and social enterprise. We start from the assumption that there is a similar lack of dialogue across Europe’s different realities, with especially Eastern practitioners and scholars missing from European and global forums of debate. 

    This paper offers a self-reflective analysis of research on solidarity initiatives carried out in Hungary within the framework of the EU-funded project “Solidarity in European Societies: Empowerment, Social Justice and Citizenship”. The paper starts with presenting findings derived from ten case studies spanning five policy areas (access to housing, education for vulnerable minorities, refugee support, mental health and local food provision/rural development) focusing on whether participatory governance was a characteristic and/or conducive factor for success. It then analyses the extent to whether large-scale European collaborative research projects may push certain ideas and narratives onto contexts for which they are not suitable, and the consequences thereof. Our central argument based on this double analysis is that the Hungarian case studies do not support the notion that participatory governance is a precondition for social enterprises and solidarity economy initiatives to strive.

  • 15.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Nordlund, Carl
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    The Building Blocks of a Euroregion: novel Metrics to Measure Cross-border Integration2015Ingår i: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 37, nr 3, s. 371-389Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how the notion of European integration at the local level can be conceptualized and measured. Based on a process-oriented inclusive understanding of integration and using relational datasets that maps both domestic and cross-border communication ties among political representatives in four Euroregions along the borders of Hungary–Slovakia and Sweden–Norway, we begin by applying and theoretically dissecting network-analytical metrics based on frequency of ties. Despite finding that such measures capture analytically relevant properties of political cross-border networks, we argue that they are less than ideal for capturing the notion of political integration. Instead, with inspiration from the blockmodeling tradition in network analysis, we propose two novel metrics—cross-border connectivity and integrational overfitting. These metrics not only enrich our understanding of political integration in cross-border settings but also can serve as useful mapping tools for policy-makers. A software client enabling the analysis of these measures supplements this article. © 2014, Taylor & Francis.

  • 16.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Telle, Stefan
    Collaborative and cross-border urban governance: What does experience teach us?2018Ingår i: Report on the 5th workshop of the RSA research network on Regional Economic and Policy History, 2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    While border areas are often portrayed as peripheries (Stoddard 1991), in the European Union many urban centers are located in close proximity to national borders. Since the 1950s,there has been increasing policy activity in suchborder regions. Through associations of municipalities, regions and private actors, often through so called Euroregions (Perkmann2003), local actors have formed collaborative governance arrangements to solve joint policy problems, pursue common normative ideals or simply to utilize available funds (Svensson 2013). This paper exploresthe extent to which urban cross-borderand inter-regionalarrangements wereable to connect actors in collaborative frameworks to drive economic development (policy). First, the paper shows that parallel to economic and political integration in Europe, urban regionsincreasinglybegan to beseenas engines of economic growth. Second, the paperreviewsthe collaborative governance literature and adapts the insights to the question of how urban economic development may benefit from collaboration.Third, the paper uses project data on cross-border and interregional cooperation intwo European capital city regions in proximity to a national border: Vienna and Copenhagen. We focus on projectscovering two themes: economic cooperation and governance.The analysis evaluates how cooperation evolved over the last three programming periods. Next, it evaluates differences and similarities in objectives and project structures (number and type of partners, funding, governance) between cross-border and interregional. Finally, concerning outcomes, the paper analyses severalprojects in depth regarding impact, learning and sustainability. Drawing on the analytical framework derived from the review of the collaborative governance literature, it asks to what extent have these initiatives engaged actors from different (vertical) levels and to what extent have they successfully incorporatedhorizontal (non-governmental) actors in horizontal networks? In doing so, what role has the objective ofeconomic development playedin specific arrangements, what are the concrete measuresplanned and implemented, what are the outcomes,andwhat can be learnedfrom this experiencefor the development of collaborative multi-level governance arrangements?The key proposition of the paper is that there is much to learn from past attempts at collaborativeurbangovernance,both in terms of failures and successes. The experienceofcomplexcross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoralgovernance settingsmakes thempotential role modelsfor innovative economicdevelopment policies. At the same time,practical obstacles and failures to live up to expectationsalso show their value as both negative and positive precedents.

  • 17.
    Svensson, Sara
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Ungern.
    Öjehag, Andreas
    Karlstads Universitet, Karlstad, Sverige.
    Politik bortom gränsen: globala trender och lokala realiteter2012Ingår i: På gränsen: Interaktion, attraktivitet och globalisering i Inre Skandinavien / [ed] Eva Olsson & Atle Hauge, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 18.
    Szalai, Júlia
    et al.
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    On Civil Society and the Social Economy in Hungary2018Ingår i: Intersections. East European Journal of Society and Politics, E-ISSN 2416-089X, Vol. 4, nr 4, s. 107-124Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While the development of civil society organisations in Hungary has been impressive in terms of number and diversity, its influence has remained limited on policy-making. Administrative attempts to draw civil society under tight regulation and control have produced a blurring of the boundaries between the civil and the public spheres that, in turn, has impaired the independent voice and criticism of civil society. Therefore, economic acts based on solidarity and originating from civil society do not automatically form or increase a ‘social economy’ but become as contested by and as intermingled with political developments as other acts of civil society. This development also has affected the profile of civil activities: against the earlier impressive weight of anti-poverty, anti-racist and human rights engagements, the ‘non-risky’ activities of sports and leisure services have come to domination. A turn toward declining participation is a warning sign of the decreasing contribution of civil society to everyday democracy.

  • 19.
    Telle, Stefan
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    An organizational ecology approach to EGTC creation in East Central Europe2019Ingår i: Regional & Federal Studies, ISSN 1359-7566, E-ISSN 1743-9434Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    European Groupings of Territorial Cooperation (EGTC) are a legal instrument intended to facilitate institutional cross-border cooperation. Launched in 2006, EGTC creation was particularly swift in East Central Europe, albeit with significant variation between different border regions. The article adopts an organizational ecology perspective to explain this variation and argues that the level of organizational density inside a cross-border ecological niche is crucial for EGTC creation. The analysis draws on policy documents and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders from four border areas in East Central Europe. It finds that lower levels of organizational density in unitary states constitute a favourable organizational environment for EGTC creation. However, rather than enhancing autonomous decision-making in the border region, we find evidence that unitary state support for EGTC creation reflects a political strategy to centralize control over cross-border cooperation. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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