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  • 1.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Lifestyle advice and lifestyle change: to what degree does lifestyle advice of healthcare professionals reach the population, focusing on gender, age and education?2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 118-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health promotion practice in health care has a high priority in the endeavour to achieve equal opportunities for health and diversity in health among the population. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there is any connection between the lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals and the lifestyle change of the population, focusing on age, gender and education level. The study is based on the data from a national population survey in Sweden in which 52 595 patients who had attended health care were interviewed by phone. The participants were asked whether healthcare professionals had raised the subject of lifestyle during the visit and whether the advice they gave had contributed to a lifestyle change. The results indicated that lifestyle issues were raised with 32.2% of those who attended health care, particularly among men, younger patients and those with a high education level. When lifestyle issues were raised, the advice contributed to 39.2% of patients making a lifestyle change, to a higher extent among men, older patients and those with a low education level. The study shows that lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals, during both emergency and outpatient healthcare visits, is an important contributor to patients' lifestyle change. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  • 2.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bergh, Håkan
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Motivational interviewing as method in health promotion practice: A Swedish study2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 207-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg and School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Primary healthcare nurses' experiences with motivational interviewing in health promotion practice2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 23-24, p. 3322-3330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. 

    The aim of the study was to describe primary healthcare nurses’ experiences with motivational interviewing as a method for health promotion practice.

    Background. 

    A person’s lifestyle has a major effect on his or her health. Motivational interviewing is one way of working with lifestyle changes in health promotion practice. The basic plan of motivational interviewing is to help people understand their lifestyle problems and make positive lifestyle changes. Motivational interviewing has been proven to be more effective than conventional methods in increasing patient motivation.

    Design. 

    This study has a descriptive design and uses a qualitative method.

    Methods. 

    Twenty nurses who worked in primary health care and actively used motivational interviewing in their work were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used to process the data.

    Results. 

    The primary healthcare nurses’ experiences with motivational interviewing as a method of health promotion practice demonstrate that motivational interviewing is a demanding, enriching and useful method that promotes awareness and guidance in the care relationship. The results also show that motivational interviewing is a valuable tool for primary healthcare nurses’ health promotion practice.

    Conclusion. 

    This study shows that motivational interviewing places several different demands on nurses who use this method. Those who work with motivational interviewing must make an effort to incorporate this new method to avoid falling back into the former practice of simply giving advice. Maintaining an open mind while implementing motivational interviewing in real healthcare settings is crucial for nurses to increase this method’s effectiveness.

    Relevance to clinical practice. 

    The nurses in the study had a positive experience with motivational interviewing, which can contribute to the increased use, adaption and development of motivational interviewing among primary healthcare professionals. Increased motivational interviewing knowledge and skills would also contribute to promotion of health lifestyle practices.

  • 4.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    PhD Student, Department of Research, Development and Education, Hospital of Halland, Halmstad.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    GP, Department of Research, Development and Education, Hospital of Halland, Varberg, Sweden .
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health promotion practice and its implementation in Swedish health care2013In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Health promotion practice is an important work assignment within the entire health and medical care sector. Nurses are important for the development and implementation of health promotion in clinical practice. Aim The aim was to describe how district nurses view health promotion practice and how it was implemented in clinical practice following a training initiative. Design The study has a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Methods The sample consisted of three focus groups with 16 participants. The interviews were conducted as a conversation with focus on the district nurses view of health promotion and its implementation in clinical practice. The data have been processed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Results Three categories, titled Training as motivation, Lack of grounding and Lack of scope were identified. The result demonstrated that training provides motivation, but also the importance of grounding in the organization and the need for scope in performing health promotion practice. Discussion Our results show that the training initiative has contributed positively to the district nurses' view of health promotion practice, but that they also feel that there are obstacles. The district nurses in our study suggest that health promotion practice should be more visible, and not something that is done when time permits. Conclusion The district nurses feel motivated and have an enthusiasm for health promotion practice but more time and resources are required to design successful health-promoting initiatives. Before implementing a major training initiative for healthcare personnel in health promotion, it is essential to examine whether the conditions for this exist in the organization

  • 5.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Patients' experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing.

    Methods: This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results: The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process of lifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged, the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions: This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self-reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed. © 2014 Brobeck et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 6.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Couples in Need of Home Care Services: Experiences With Support From Care Professionals2018In: Home Health Care Management & Practice, ISSN 1084-8223, E-ISSN 1552-6739, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many older people desire to remain in their homes and be cared for by a family member, but this arrangement requires support from care professionals. The aim was to describe how couples in need of home care services experienced the received support from care professionals. A qualitative design with content analysis was used. Data were collected through diaries and focus groups consisting of eight couples between 65 and 80 years, and two registered nurses. The main findings are described by the following categories: Organizational adaptedWithholdingBeing in a gap, resulting in the theme Lack of professional support. Couples experienced shortcomings that were related to the organization, the care professionals, and the couples themselves. The theme Lack of professional support requires more knowledge. © The Author(s) 2018

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