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  • 1.
    Dienel, Hans-Luidger
    et al.
    University of Berlin, Inst.for Coop.Mgmt./Interdiscip. Res, Germany.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Peterson, Martin
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    The Historical Context of the Evolution of National Research Systems and International RTD Collaboration2002In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Sciences, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 265-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A historical overview of European science and technology suggests the existence of two parallel trends: those of nationalization and de-nationalization. Since the Enlightenment, besides the modernist universalist perspective on science we find nationalist pressures pushing the idea of socially constructed technology, thus generating scientific results determined by national (cultural) factors. Nationalization and de-nationalization thrive together in certain circumstances--for instance, in disciplines such as geology, meteorology, botany or even physics and chemistry. The entry into the scene of commercial interests gives rise to national interests, in turn hampering efficiency and progress from the scientific perspective. Through national research policies these differential development patterns have tended to create an often unnecessary conflict between basic and applied research. The EU RTD framework has still to resolve these contradictions.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Per
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Hammarlund, Karl GunnarHalmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).Lund, ErikNielsen, Carsten TageRoskilde Universitet, Roskilde, Danmark.
    Historiedidaktik i Norden 9: Del 1: historiemedvetande - historiebruk2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Eliasson, Per
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Hammarlund, Karl GunnarHalmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).Lund, ErikNielsen, Carsten TageRoskilde Universitet, Roskilde, Danmark.
    Historiedidaktik i Norden 9: Del 2: historisk kunskap2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Authentic assessment in history education: Emphasising the “usefulness” of history2018In: Teaching History, Learning History, Promoting History: Papers from the Bielefeld Conference on Teaching History in Higher Education / [ed] Friederike Neumann & Leah Shopkow, Framkfurt am Main: Wochenschau Verlag , 2018, p. 65-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the so-called Bologna Process, syllabi in Swedish higher education have been revised and built around learning outcomes, focusing on skills and competencies, both generic and subject-specific. However, it can be questioned whether assessment practice have undergone corresponding changes.In this chapter I give examples of examination tasks set by History departments at Swedish universities and discuss to what extent they correspond with the learning outcomes for the courses. I also discuss the possibility to create "authentic assessment" tasks in order to better determine students' abilities and competencies of relevance in the field of History.

  • 5.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM).
    Barnet och barnomsorgen: Bilden av barnet i ett socialpolitiskt projekt1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Swedish child-care institutions - day nurseries, kindergartens - did not until the 1930s become a concern of the Government. In 1943 the Swedish Riksdag for the first time passed a bill that gave child-care institutions a Government subsidy.

    This thesis deals with the Government's and the parliamentary commissions' attitudes to child-care institutions. Which type of institution ought to receive a subsidy? And for what reasons?

    The main argument for child-care institutions has always been that they could stimulate a sound development, for the child's own good and for society's. From the 1930s and into the 1950s most participants in the child-care debate stated that the kindergarten or part-time institutions for the pre-school child from the age of three and upwards was the preferable type. Day nurseries for children, even infants, of families were both parents had to work might be necessary but were to be seen as an emergency solution. From the mid-60s the attitu-de changed. Step by step full-time day nurseries became the institutions that were given priority by the Government.

    This change in attitude presupposes that the notion of the child changed as well. But it did not change in a vacuum. Borrowing an explanatory model from sociologist Johan Asplund, the thesis treats the child as a "figure of thought", placed between a super-structural discourse on child-care and society's basic, material conditions. Important changes at the level of discourse have been the attitude to modern, industrial society, e.g. the necessity of learning to live and work in a society which is complex, highly specialized and in constant change, and the debate on women's emancipation. At the level of material conditions, the most conspicious change is that more and more women have entered the labour market.

    The changing notion of the child can be understood as the effect of an influence from discourse and base on the "figure of thought". At the same time, the "figure of thought" in-fluenced the discourse. Thus, a child-care system for the benefit of child and woman and labour market could be established, and harmony could be created, at least in the discourse.

  • 6.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Between the Mirror and the Wall: Boundary and Identity in Peter Weiss’ Novel Die Ästhetik des Widerstands2009In: Borders as Experience, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2009, , p. 218p. 117-129Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Beyond the Book Cover: Curriculum Goals and Learning Materials2010In: Opening the Mind or Drawing Boundaries?: History Texts in Nordic Schools / [ed] Þorsteinn Helgason, Simone Lässig, Göttingen: V&R Unipress, 2010, p. 107-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subject curricula of the Swedish school start with a section devoted to “Goals to aim for” or learning outcomes. The outcomes here described are more often than not generic skills or adherence to certain values with the purpose to serve as a foundation for future learning and development. Typical examples are the ability to consciously form and express ethical standpoints based on knowledge and personal experiences or to empathise with and understand other people’s situation.

    In addition there is another section headed “Goals to be achieved” or learning objectives closely coupled to assessment criteria. These objectives can relate to content as well as to skill, but in both cases they can be described in a final form, as knowledge either gained or not gained. The teacher/examinator should be able to assess to what extent the pupils have attained these objectives and translate it into grades.

    This double set of goals is, in it’s way, both natural and unavoidable. But an unforeseen consequence is that it renders the Swedish school system a certain degree of ambiguity which in turn can be seen as reflecting a transition from one paradigm of learning to another: one focussing on learning as content and product and the other on learning as process and development. At present the “learning as product paradigm” and a strive for accurate and reliable assessment criteria (that in turn could be used for quality assessment and accountability) dominate the political agenda.

    The preliminary findings from a survey conducted in 2006/2007 indicate that History teacher vacillate between the content/product and the process/development mode of learning. Teachers express a certain degree of disappointment with the dominating learning tools – the textbooks – that in their opinion focus mainly on content. Working towards the learning outcomes of the curricula will therefore require that textbooks are supplemented with other learning material. The survey results, however, indicates that supplementary learning material plays a limited role in everyday teaching and as a consequence learning objectives rather than the desired learning outcomes become guiding principles. The teachers’ reluctance to step outside the boundaries created by the textbook may at least partly be explained from the fact that the theoretical base of the concept of learning as process and development is of recent date and therefore has had limited impact on teacher education.

    The aim of the study is to contribute to the understanding of relations between educational goals and educational experience but also, hopefully, to add some useful items to the toolbox of History teaching practice.

  • 8.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Borders as Experience2009Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Continuous Assessment of Historical Knowledge and Competence: Challenges, Pitfalls, and Possibilities2015In: Enriching History Teaching and Learning: Challenges, Possibilities, Practice: Proceedings of the Linköping Conference on History Teaching and Learning in Higher Education / [ed] David Ludvigsson & Alan Booth, Linköping: ISAK, Linköping University , 2015, p. 33-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High-stake, end-of-course assignment tasks are not only experienced as stressful by students. It can also be questioned whether a single assignment task, however complex and many-sided, can address all relevant learning outcomes for a course and catch the multi-faceted character of historical knowledge.This paper discusses continuous assessment as an alternative to traditional end-of-course assessment. Previous studies as well as experiences from using continuous assessment in History courses at Halmstad University has been used in order to illustrate opportunities and drawbacks. A tentative conclusion is that continuous assessment does provide for more varied assignment tasks, thus giving teachers a broader view of students' achievements. Using continuous assessment, the assignment tasks can also more easily be experienced as part of the learning process and not only a checkpoint. Continuous assessment can therefore help students to develop a meta-understanding of their own learning.

  • 10.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM).
    Den historiska intrigen: kan historia uppfattas som narration?2000In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 2000, no 4, p. 371-380Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Developing skills through history education2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last few years my main part of my teaching has been within the field of Teacher Education. In order to prepare my students for their future profession as History teachers in the secondary school, my courses must of course deal with History, but also with how the learning of History can be facilitated and promoted. Learning History is of course linked to knowing History, and it was a somewhat strange experience when I suddenly realised that during my seven years of History studies – from the first undergraduate course to the PhD exam – no one had ever raised the issue of what it is to know History. Oh, we learned a lot about how to achieve historical knowledge, for instance through meticulous and critical source studies, but what that knowledge really consisted of was never discussed. So what do we mean when we say ‘Professor X really masters her subject’, or ‘Dr. Y displays a profound knowledge in his field of study’? Part of the knowledge is of course substantial (content) knowledge – but only a part. Collecting and storing facts – knowing that – doesn’t make you a historian. You must also be able to use the facts: interpret them, reason from them, make conclusions from them – knowing how. To this procedural knowledge can be added the conceptual knowledge that can be seen as a prerequisite for a scholarly approach to History. What students of History – on all levels, from primary school to postgraduate studies – is, then, not only to learn about what happened in the past but how to think about what happened in the past. And just as you will find it hard to learn playing the flute through listening to lectures or reading handbooks on flute-playing, thinking historically is very much a question of ‘learning by doing’ which means that History courses must give ample room for training the capacity of thinking. In my presentation I will further discuss possible interpretations of substance, procedure, and concepts in History studies as well as giving a few examples of how they can be illustrated and practised in class.

  • 12.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    "En trygg och demokratisk identitet på basis av det historiska arvet" - kulturarv och demokrati i den svenska skolan2006In: Demokratiskt kulturarv?: nationella institutioner, universella värden, lokala praktiker / [ed] Annika Alzén & Peter Aronsson, Linköping: Linköpings Universitet , 2006, p. 91-99Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Historia som ämnesdisciplin och vardagsliv – ämnesdidaktiska utmaningar i ett flerkulturellt samhälle2015In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 3, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if an overwhelming majority of historians acknowledges that history can harbour a multitude of interpretations and thus a multitude of narratives of the past, history – as encountered by students from primary school to the first year at the university – more often than not takes the form of a single, coherent narrative marked by an almost inexorable determinism. Ever since the beginning of the 19th century, such public narratives have served as instruments for promoting a shared sense of (national) community, not least within the compulsory school system. In our time, in our pluralistic societies where the idea of a common past shared by all has become untenable, such public narratives also pose a dilemma that is both political and ethical: how can social coherence, inclusion, and integration be achieved if (a) community is dependent on a shared past while (b) no shared past can be found? In this article I suggest that a possible way of solving, or steering clear of, this dilemma is through a history education that strives to promote an understanding of history as interpretations, as (re-)constructions of narratives of the past. Such an understanding underlines the importance of being able to deconstruct already existing narratives. It will also elucidate history’s role in society, a role that consists not only of what history says about the past but also of what history does for shaping our perceptions of the present and the future. And, finally, it offers students the tools needed for evaluating and choosing among the many narratives of the past, picking those that may serve them as aids for temporal orientation in everyday life.

  • 14.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Historical Consciousness – a cul-de-sac or an indispensable contribution to history teaching?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last 30 years or so, the concept ‘historical consciousness’ has been frequently used in the discourse of History teaching and learning.The concept has often been linked to ‘heritage’ or ‘collective memory’ and thus sometimes dismissed as ‘non-historian’. It has also been linked to, sometimes equated to, ‘identity’ and it has sometimes been argued that a disciplinary approach to history denies the relevance of students' individual identities and life-worlds – an issue that cannot be brushed aside in a diverse society.Thanks to its vagueness, the concept therefore illustrates what Norwegian historian and history educator May-Brith Ohman Nielsen has called the two poles of historical knowledge: the scholarly/disciplinary pole and the enigmatic/poetic pole where the latter is about existential issues, community, identity, security, comfort – that which goes beyond the rational and cannot be analysed. The polarity does not, however, imply that these two aspects of history are incompatible. By highlighting the polarity, the concept ‘historical consciousness’ can also serve as a starting-point for linking the poles together, returning to Carl Becker’s proposition, put forward 80 years ago:“Our proper function is not to repeat the past but to make use of it, to correct and rationalize for common use Mr. Everyman's mythological adaptation of what actually happened. We are surely under bond to be as honest and as intelligent as human frailty permits; but the secret of our success in the long run is in conforming to the temper of  Mr. Everyman, which we seem to guide only because we are so sure, eventually, to follow it.”References of importance, apart from Becker and Ohman Nielsen mentioned above, include Keith C. Barton, Bernard Eric Jensen, Linda Levstik and the reports from the History Learning Project, Indiana University.

  • 15.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Historiemedvetande: att förena förflutenhet och nutid, skolhistoria och livsvärld2014In: Faglig kunnskap i skole og lærerutdanning: Nordiske bidrag til samfunnsfag- og historiedidaktikk / [ed] Lise Kvande, Bergen, Norge: Fagbokforlaget, 2014, p. 201-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet 'historiemedvetande' har sedan 30 år tillbaka varit ständigt närvarandei nordisk historiedidaktisk debatt. Sedan 20 år tillbaka har begreppet också haften central och framträdande roll i danska och svenska läroplaner.Begreppet är mångtydigt och öppnar för flera olika tolkningsmöjligheter. Detta har i nordisk debatt skapat ett spänningsförhållande mellan en historiedidaktik inspirerad av angloamerikansk forskning med fokus på kognitiva processer och förmågor och en som vidareutvecklat tysk forskning kring begreppet historiemedvetande i en tradition av handlings- och erfarenhetsorienterad pedagogik.I kapitlet diskuteras hur resultaten från det tyska forskningsprojektet 'FUER Geschichtsbewusstsein' kan öppna för ett brobyggande mellan dessa historiedidaktiska traditioner. En praktisk tillämpning kan vara att arbeta med mikrohistoriskt och personhistoriskt material för att samtidigt synliggöra två perspektiv på historien: den disciplinära historiens (skolhistoriens) fokus på övergripande processer och förlopp, och det personliga livsvärldsperspektivet där sambandet mellan förflutenhetstolkning, nutidsförståelse och framtidsperspektiv kan framträda ur enskilda inidividers handlingar och val.

  • 16.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Historisk kunskap i svensk grundskola - ett försök till begreppsbestämning2012In: Historiedidaktik i Norden 9: Del 2: historisk kunskap / [ed] Per Eliasson, KG Hammarlund, Erik Lund, Carsten Tage Nielsen, Malmö: Malmö högskola och Högskolan i Halmstad , 2012, p. 15-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Obituary: In memory of Martin Peterson, 1941-20152015In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Sciences, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 508-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Martin’s home base was Scandinavia, but he felt equally at home when, as guest lecturer or conference speaker, he journeyed from the Baltic Sea to the River Plate, from the Bosporus to the coast of New England. He participated in research projects under the auspices of or funded by UNESCO, the EU Framework Programmes, the Nordic Council’s research programme NordForsk, and the Swedish Council for Planning and Co-ordination of Research. A prolific writer, he published works on identity, urban and rural development, cultural encounters, industrial democracy, research policy, the threatening dismantling of the welfare state, and social inclusion and exclusion.

  • 18.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Om skönlitteratur som historia och historia som skönlitteratur2009In: Historier: Arton- och nittonhundratalens skönlitteratur som historisk källa / [ed] Christer Ahlberger, Henric Bagerius, Carl Holmberg, Ulrika Lagerlöf Nilsson, Pia Lundqvist, Tomas Nilson, Brita Planck, Göteborg: Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet , 2009, p. 94-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Promoting Procedural Knowledge in History Education2012In: Enhancing Student Learning in History: Perspectives on University History Teaching / [ed] David Ludvigsson, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2012, p. 117-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK). University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regional Reform and Citizen Participation in Sweden2004In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Sciences, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 145-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven years ago the Swedish government launched a Regional Reform Programme with the aim of establishing a new intermediate level of governance alongside the national level and that of the local municipality. The conditions for achieving constructive institutionalization differ considerably in Skåne and Västra Götaland, the two regions participating in the pilot programme. However, the level of citizen participation (i.e. voter turnout in regional elections) in the two regions does not differ--in both regions, citizens have demonstrated tremendous indifference towards the new fora. One reason for this could be that the reform has to a very large degree been built on traditional political structures, which in turn have suffered a loss of credibility in the past decades. There might, however, also be reason to question the often presupposed link between a region's degree of socio-cultural consolidation and its acceptance as a vital and meaningful political entity.

  • 21.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Teaching History in a multicultural society – trends and tendencies in Nordic schools2015In: Nordicum-Mediterraneum, ISSN 1670-6242, E-ISSN 1670-6242, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting the history and heritage of the majority culture in a pluralist society might, at worst, mean giving up the control of one’s own past and assimilating into a new ’master narrative’. By re-defining history as a school subject, putting at its core not a set narrative of the past but the cognitive process of thinking about the past, the very process of knowing and understanding might form a ground for a shared experience of history while at the same time allow for the co-existence of different narratives. History curricula in the Nordic countries have for the last two decades gradually moved in this direction. Whether classroom work has done so as well remains less certain. Recent studies suggest that History teachers acknowledge that teaching and learning must adjust to the reality of pluralism but are less confident about how to meet the challenge in concrete terms.

  • 22.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    To know that or to know how?: An attempt to integrate content and skills in history teaching2011In: The processes of history teaching: an international symposium held at Malmö University, Sweden, March 5th-7th 2009 / [ed] Kenneth Nordgren, Per Eliasson, Carina Rönnqvist, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2011, p. 155-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    What can we learn from school today?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the challenges familiar to every History lecturer is the need for developing students’ historical literacy. Most often History students take an interest in their field of study, they are verbal and outspoken, they feel at home on the World Wide Web. At the same time they have difficulties grasping the difference between ’fact’ and ’evidence’, between 'event' and 'cause', or between ’opinion’ and ’argument’ - not to mention the difference between ’History’ and ’the Past’.

    The challenge is made greater by the fact that very few of today’s lecturers ever encountered lectures or seminars devoted to such issues during our own History studies. Historical literacy was something you acheived from doing history, period. Building on our own experience is therefore of little use and help must be sought elsewhere.

    In my own teaching I have sought inspiration from Jerome K. Bruner while at the same time turning him on his head. Bruner’s oft-quoted remark, that intellectual activity anywhere is the same, whether at the frontier of knowledge or in a third grade classroom, has most often been used as an argument for a renewed third grade teaching, moving away from rote learning toward development on skills, understanding, and independent reasoning. His line of reasoning can, however, is equally meaningful when reversed. The tools that School History teaching uses to promote and facilitate these qualities - simple exercises, lesson plans, learning materials - can be equally efficient as part of undergraduate courses. The tools must be adapted to suit the users but, as Bruner points out, the difference is in degree, not in kind.

    In my paper I will give examples of successful (and less successful) implementation of School History teaching in academic coursework as well as providing arguments for their use.

  • 24.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Lindahl, Helena
    Eketånga Montessoriskola Halmstad.
    Att lära historia – inte bara lära om historia2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den kunskap som eleverna förväntas erövra i den svenska skolan är, enligt de nu gällande läroplanerna för grundskola och gymnasium, ett mångtydigt begrepp: ”Kunskap kommer till uttryck i olika former – såsom fakta, förståelse, färdighet och förtrogenhet – som förutsätter och samspelar med varandra. Skolans arbete måste inriktas på att ge utrymme för olika kunskapsformer och att skapa ett lärande där dessa former balanseras och blir till en helhet.” I den ämnesspecifika kursplanen för grundskolan uttrycks historieämnets syfte analogt som ”att utveckla ett kritiskt tänkande och ett analytiskt betraktelsesätt som redskap för att förstå och förklara samhället och dess kultur.” Det är dock osäkert i vilken utsträckning den svenska skolan faktiskt uppfyller sin målsättning. Utvärderingar, senast den nationella utvärdering av grundskolan 2003 (NU03), antyder att undervisningen fortfarande – åtminstone till en del – präglas av traditionell allmänbildning som avspeglar läroböckernas innehåll. Undersökningar av läromedel och läromedelsanvändning pekar också i riktning mot att elever i den svenska skolan främst möter historien i form av fakta som ska läras in, inte ifrågasättas, prövas eller vidareutvecklas. Historieundervisningen kan alltså fortfarande ofta utformas så att eleverna förväntas ”lära att” snarare än ”lära hur”. Eller med andra ord att eleverna lär om historien snarare än att de tillägnar sig en förståelse av den egna livsvärlden betraktad i ett perspektiv av förflutet-nutid-framtid. En bidragande orsak till detta kan vara att de svenska styrdokumenten visserligen formulerar mål för undervisningen men inte lämnar några föreskrifter eller rekommendationer om form och innehåll. Detta ger stor frihet för den enskilde läraren, men ställer också krav på lärarens förmåga till innovativ planering, kunskap om och tillgång till läromedel och läranderesurser samt tillgång till tid för planering och genomförande. Under läsåret 2008/09 har lärare från Högskolan i Halmstad (lärarutbildningen) och Eketånga Montessoriskola arbetat med att utveckla dels en översiktsplanering för historia i årskurs 7-9, dels en detaljplanerad modul för fem veckors undervisning i svensk 1500- och 1600-talshistoria (genomförd under november-december 2008). En utgångspunkt för översiktsplaneringen har varit den struktur som prövats i det brittiska Schools History Project vilket innebär utrymme för historia som utvecklingslinjer, temastudier, djupstudier och lokalhistoria. I den detaljplanerade modulen har tonvikten lagts vid lokalhistoria, dels eftersom 1600-talet satt tydliga spår i Halmstads historia, dels eftersom lokalhistoria gör det möjligt för eleverna att knyta samman det förflutna med den konkreta livsvärld som omger dem. Läroboken har kompletterats med historiska kartor och annat källmaterial. Klassrumsarbetet har kompletterats med exkursioner och museibesök. I detta paper presenteras dels undervisningsplaneringen och de historiedidaktiska överväganden som legat till grund för dess utformning, dels elevers och undervisande lärares synpunkter på den genomförda undervisningsmodulen.

  • 25.
    Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Technology in Time, Space, and Mind: Aspects of Technology Transfer and Diffusion2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
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