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  • 1.
    Altmann, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Engberg, Robert
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Getinge Sterilization AB, Getinge, Sweden.
    Frugal Innovation and Knowledge Transferability: Innovation for Emerging Markets Using Home-Based R&D2016In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western firms are generally advised to rely on emerging market partners when attempting to develop frugal innovations for these developing markets. Underlying such advice is the idea that the requirements of emerging market consumers may not be familiar to Western firms and local developers will better understand local needs. We propose an alternative approach for high-tech firms—one that relies on home-based breakthrough R&D focused on emerging market needs. Three frugal innovation projects at a Swedish medical devices manufacturer serve to illustrate both how home-based breakthrough R&D can help managers reconceptualize their core products and the contextual factors favoring such an approach. © 2016, Industrial Research Institute.

  • 2.
    Altmann, Peter
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Engberg, Robert
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managing Human Resources and Technology Innovation: The Impact of Process and Outcome Uncertainties2015In: International Journal of Innovation Science, ISSN 1757-2223, E-ISSN 1757-2231, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 91-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High technology innovation performance relies on a skilful utilization of human resources. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of interpreted outcome and process uncertainties on the effective management of human resources for technology innovation. This is achieved through an insider-outsider based case study approach of three medical device innovations with varying degrees of radicalness. Findings suggest that uncertainties in process and outcome strongly influence what constitutes effective management of human resources for technology innovation. Findings also offer insights into when certain innovation theories hold, and suggestions on how to manage human resources and technology innovation under various conditions of uncertainty.

  • 3.
    Engberg, Robert
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Altmann, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regulation and Technology Innovation: A comparison of Stated and Formal Regulatory Barriers throughout the Technology Innovation Process2015In: Journal of Technology Management & Innovation, ISSN 0718-2724, E-ISSN 0718-2724, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regulation is often mentioned as a barrier to technology innovation in various industries. Delayed market entry, stifled creativity, added activities and resource requirements are some frequently mentioned barriers. The study presented here explored various claims of regulation acting as a barrier to technology innovation. The findings suggest that formal statutory requirements only partly explain why regulation is perceived as a technology innovation barrier. Findings further indicate several discrepancies between stated and formal regulatory barriers and suggest that the majority of the stated barriers emerge within the organization during operationalization and the technology innovation process. © Journal of Technology Management & Innovation, 2015.

  • 4.
    Engberg, Robert
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hörte, Sven-Åke
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Lundbäck, Magnus
    School of Business, Gunnebo AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Strategy implementation and organizational levels: resourcing for innovation as a case2015In: Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, ISSN 2051-6614, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 157-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of the link between human capital and strategy across hierarchies.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – Using data on personality traits as a proxy for strategy implementation success, empirical data included 1,738 Operational Personality Questionnaire personality traits assessments in one large multinational firm. Respondents spanned from top-management to white-collar employees. Besides personality traits, measures include employment level and employment status. In addition, a total of 43 interviews were performed on the employee-level, with middle managers, with senior managers, and with executive-level managers.

    Findings

    – After a strategic shift, successful implementation of a human resource management (HRM) strategy decreased down through the hierachies. This has implications for a firm trying to realign its resources to a new strategy. If the strategic shift is large, this will pose a great problem as human capital further down in the hierarchy will not be aligned to the new strategy, but rather be aligned to the old strategy.

    Research limitations/implications

    – The findings are discussed using the concept of the strategic centre of gravity. The authors elaborate on the concept in terms of the origin, mass, and inertia of the strategic centre of gravity.

    Practical implications

    – A successful strategic shift in this sense will to a great extent depend on how successful the implementation is at lower levels of hierarchy, thus pointing to the importance to considering this when designing and pursuing strategic change.

    Originality/value

    – The research contributes to the HRM literature by furthering the understanding of aligning human capital on different organizational levels to strategy and by developing the concept of the strategic centre of gravity. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited

  • 5.
    Engberg, Robert
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Barriers in communication of an innovation strategy between strategic and operation level managers2013In: Proceedings of the 20th EurOMA Conference: Operations Management at the Heart of the Recovery / [ed] Brian Fynes & Paul Coughlan, Dublin, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication has been identified as the main barrier to strategy implementation. Using communications theory we develop a framework that can be used to understand important dimensions of communication when communicating innovation strategies. By means of a qualitative multi-case study approach, we analyze the strategy content, the communication channels used, and the communication uniformity among managers and relate these dimensions to strategy implementation success factors. We conducted a total of 32 interviews among senior managers in research and product development, HR managers, HR specialists, chief engineers, product managers, project managers, and engineers. We sought to understand how communication of an innovation strategy was performed and further how such communication was interpreted and acted upon. Our findings suggest that the content of the strategy together with the communication channels and the uniformity between managers will affect strategy implementation success. Further our findings suggest that intentional vagueness in strategy content, contrary to expectations, can be fruitful in certain cases.

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