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  • 1.
    Hamilton-Jones, Jo
    et al.
    Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, United Kingdom.
    Svane, Torben
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    The e-Temple: online reflective diaries using a virtual learning environment2004In: ITHET 2004: proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training / [ed] Yavuz Akpinar, Piscataway, NJ.: IEEE , 2004, p. 487-492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning is a life-long process in an ever-changing environment. For students and professionals alike, the ability to constantly manage new knowledge and skills is pivotal. In such an undertaking, it is important not only to master content. To enhance our overall learning capability, we must also improve methods for acquiring other, less explored skill sets. This work presents efforts made to help Swedish and UK students to develop and foster reflective skills using Internet technologies, especially with regard to the "hows, whens, and whys" of personal learning. Lessons learned point to important considerations when trying to encourage students to reflect - in general, and on systems design.

  • 2.
    Hamilton-Jones, Jo
    et al.
    Aston University, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Developing research using reflective diaries2003In: Conference proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848, E-ISSN 2267-1242, article id 1263319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conference proceedings often present successful research and best cases. This paper presents a case that initially did NOT develop as anticipated and reflections as to why outcomes were different than expected. It also suggests important factors to consider before similar activities are undertaken in the future. The case presented investigates reflective assessments for the module "Current Issues in Edutainment Software Design", given to seniors in the Edutainment Software Design program at Halmstad University, Sweden. Throughout their program, these students have been indoctrinated to engage in self-reflection. Module assessments included development of both individual and group papers. Moreover, all students should reflect on their own learning process and produce their thoughts in a diary. Analysis of texts indicate that self reflection "on command" proved difficult for these students, although they had been "trained" to reflect. Compared with two other groups lacking a similar, reflective background, instructed reflection seemed easier for "untrained" students. © 2003 IEEE.

  • 3.
    Smedley, Jo
    et al.
    Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
    Svane, Torben
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Getting down to business2005In: 2005 6th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training: [proceedings] : July 7-9, 2005, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2005, p. F2A/13-F2A/18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business and information technology are highly compatible curriculum partners for academic study, providing a multitude of opportunities for enterprise and entrepreneurship. However, training students to successfully operate in today's international, fast-moving technology world requires more than merely curricula encompassing such topics. Appropriate learning styles involve the application of IT, to improve efficiency and operational styles but technology use must also be seen in a business context. The use of appropriate real-life scenarios such as case studies, role-play and designing and developing Web sites as well as the use of various information systems are important in the development of entrepreneurial skills such as creativity, dynamism, individuality and team working. This paper reports on an innovative suite of modules offered to international students, as part of their semester or year-long exchange at Halmstad University, Sweden. Dealing with numerous aspects of business information technology, these modules are delivered through various learning approaches. The overall aim is to provide the students with a wide range of perspectives and analytical skills, while acknowledging diversity in heritage and cultural influences. Modules presented could well be included in a training program for future international entrepreneurs.

  • 4.
    Svane, Torben E.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Get your students to SMILE! Exploring emerging interaction technologies2013In: 2013 12th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training (ITHET), New York: IEEE, 2013, article id 6671064Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staying updated on new interface developments is crucial to any programming or software design class. This paper reports on experiences from introducing some of the many new post-WIMP I/O possibilities emerging from e. g. mobile and sensor (Microsoft Kinect) technologies. To help students remember the technologies in mind, the acronym SMILE (Speech - Movement - Image - Language - Environment) is introduced. The paper also describes some exercises developed (for C# and JavaScript) as well as lectures and classroom activities prepared especially for introducing the topic. © 2013 IEEE

  • 5.
    Svane, Torben E.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Reality Mining in the Classroom: Simulating social behavior from machine-sensed environmental data2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents three simple applications to let students work with data generated from their mobile phones. The applications can be used as demonstrations for courses in e.g. data mining, business intelligence, and development of digital and web services. One application is entirely web based, the other two require a technology investment of about 200 USD, but the devices may also be an asset for other research/demonstration purposes.

  • 6.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Aderklou, Christina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Fritzdorf, Lotta
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hamilton-Jones, Jo
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Knowledge by user demand and self-reflection: New models for teaching and assessment in edutainment software design2001In: Conference proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848, E-ISSN 2267-1242, Vol. III, p. T1B-1-T1B-6, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on experiences from applying Knowledge by User Demand (KBUD) to teaching at the Edutainment Software Design programme at Halmstad University, Sweden. ’Edutainment’ denotes educational and recreational systems for homes, schools and work. Upon graduation, students may find careers in game design, project management, systems development etc. KBUD emphasizes participation in selection and creation of course contents, to foster a continuous review process of how to attain competencies needed to accomplish a task. Continuous self-reflection, on how and why competencies develop, and how personal learning can be refined, is highlighted in discussions and through using projects from previous courses as case studies. KBUD classes offer a core of approximately 50% of course content. Students select another 25% from a range of teacher-prepared themes and develop themselves the remaining themes under teacher supervision. KBUD modules combine subject adherence with encouraging student interest and participation, whilst also ensuring content vitality. © 2001 IEEE

  • 7.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Hamilton-Jones, J.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Establishing international co-operation in edutainment software design: Some experiences2002In: Conference proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848, E-ISSN 2267-1242, Vol. 3, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses two topics that are viewed important to the future of most institutions of higher learning. One is an increased international focus, for extended student enrolment and also for facilitating international experiences to already enrolled students. The second deals with establishing international partnerships, which not only will provide a receiver of exchange students but will also, as in the case presented, provide a partner for educational joint ventures, resulting in the establishment of innovative, new and student-attractive degree programmes. The example given presents curriculum design and work leading to the establishing of an undergraduate degree in edutainment software design at a Swedish and a British university, and an extended outlook, to also incorporate other overseas partners over time, initially from the U.S.A., Australia and New Zealand.

  • 8.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    A Business Simulator for Reality Mining2015In: 21st Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2015), Atlanta, Georgia, 2015, p. 3111-3116Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Computer School, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing, China.
    Minling, Zhu
    Computer School, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing, China.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ebbesson, Esbjörn
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Enchanting education from student input: Preparing students to envision and develop in an Internet of Things world2017In: Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, 2017, Vol. 2017-October, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Searching for "The Internet of Things" may render thousands of hits in academic databases but a challenge still remains: to let students envision as well as work with the concept in a practical way. Designing "Things for the Internet" will not only require skills in engineering and electronics but also some understanding of digital service design and business models. This paper reports on work in progress between Belgium, Sweden and China. Students with different education backgrounds and levels hand over work (ideas) to others, to develop further. Currently, there are nine open-platform exercises to use as starting points for student work and discussions. Exercises are in English and free to download and use, as are some of the lectures related to them. So far, they are used in a digital service design class and in an introductory course in embedded systems. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 10.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Zhu, Minling
    Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing, P.R. China.
    Exploring service blueprints in a university setting: Investigating students' perceptions of visual artefacts and processes in two institutions2018In: 2018 17th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, ITHET 2018, Istanbul: IEEE, 2018, article id 8424800Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of service blueprints has been applied to a university setting. Two universities (in China and Sweden) are jointly investigating the model's applicability. Initial work has included staff discussions, a blueprint set for universities, and student surveys about the search and application processes. © 2018 IEEE.

  • 11.
    Svane, Torben Ernst
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Computer School, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing, China.
    Zhu, Minling
    Computer School, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing, China.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ebbesson, Esbjörn
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Like a snowball: Adding layers of knowledge Enchanting student work with student input2017In: 2017 16th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training (ITHET): ITHET 2017, June 10-­12, 2017, Ohrid, Macedonia, IEEE conference proceedings, 2017, article id 8067794Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet of Things (IoT) seems to be a popular term nowadays, for business, society and teaching alike. Teaching students about such concepts and more importantly, making them aware of the many competency components (often called KSA-knowledge, skills, abilities) required in the development of IoT systems, services and products has been a major aim in the teaching design presented in this paper. The snowball metaphor symbolizes added layers of input, comments and suggestions delivered by Belgian, Swedish and Chinese students respectively, to peers with different backgrounds (study level, subject major, etc.). Open-platform exercises using Arduino kits are used as starting points and reports. Conceptualizations and suggestions are carried through the snowball ’chain’, which ends nearly two years later. Knowledge components are delivered e.g. through lectures. Among skills developed are practice in receiving input from and delivering output to groups different also in culture, knowledge, etc. Abilities include a demonstrated (and graded) proficiency in combining the acquired set of components, as demonstrated in workshops, discussions and reports, and in a proposed feedback loop to Sweden from China (not yet implemented). © 2017 IEEE.

  • 12.
    Svane, Torben
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Karlsson, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Suggesting a Common Framework for the Classification of Military Training and Computer Game Simulators2003In: Simulation Series, ISSN 0735-9276, E-ISSN 1562-384X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many similarities can be found between military training and computer game simulators. A review of definitions and classifications of military training simulators suggests that an adoption of DoD terminology also would suit game industry requirements. Similarities between applications are exemplified. Adhering to a common standard could possibly impose a challenge to both sectors because of (a) the rapid development of new concepts in the games sector, (b) the crossover between genres, and (c) the increasingly unclear distinction between "live" applications and simulations. The conclusion proposes further investigation into possible category dimensions that may emanate from research. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2017

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