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  • 1.
    Rosenkvist, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arrangements of everyday mobility-focussed participation2016In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 60, no 7-8, p. 808-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim is to explore how young people attending their last years in Swedish upper secondary special school describe their mobility-focussed participation. In Sweden, people with disabilities travel less than people without disabilities and international research shows that lack of accessible transportation is an important barrier to inclusion in society among people with intellectual disabilities (ID).

    Method: Study participants were pupils (>18 years old) attending their last years in Swedish upper secondary special school - a school for pupils who have been assessed to have ID. A qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews was used; some interviews were supported by photographs taken by the pupils beforehand.

    Results: Results will be presented.

    Conclusions: Implications will be discussed.

  • 2.
    Rosenkvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Sweco, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Helena
    Sweco, TransportSystem, Solna, Sweden.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    How Usable is the City for Older Bicyclists?2014In: Universal Design 2014: Three Days of Creativity and Diversity: Proceedings of the International Conference on Universal Design, UD 2014, Lund, Sweden, June 16–18, 2014 / [ed] Héctor Caltenco, Per-Olof Hedvall, Andreas Larsson, Kirsten Rassmus-Gröhn & Bitte Rydeman, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 431-432Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to examine how useable and inclusive the city is from the perspective of older bicyclists. Methods used were quantitative questionnaires and qualitative focus group interviews. Participants were people aged 65 years or older. The results showed that respondents were fairly satisfied with the transport infrastructure design. However, other road users seemed to complicate cycling, e.g. as communication and interaction between other road users was perceived as difficult and poor.

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  • 3.
    Ryan, Jean
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Helena
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosenkvist, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Schmidt, Steven M.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cycling and cycling cessation in later life: Findings from the city of Malmö2016In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to gain a greater insight into cycling as an element of mobility among those in later life. The characteristics and views of those who cycle, those who have never cycled, as well as those who have discontinued cycling in later life are the main focus. Malmö, a city in the south of Sweden with a strong emphasis on bicycle planning, is the study area. This study employed a mixed methods approach. The quantitative element comprised a survey which aimed to capture the trends at play when it comes to cycling within this age group. The qualitative element encompassed two focus groups which were carried out in order to gain a deeper insight into older persons’ perspectives and perceptions with respect to cycling. The study׳s findings illustrate the very positive and important role cycling can play in the mobility of older persons in the city of Malmö. It is not only possible but also mostly enjoyable for many older people to cycle. Cycling is a facilitator of activities and is largely associated with convenience and ease. There are clear differences between cyclists and non-cyclists, with the former generally having a wider range of mobility opportunities available to them. Cycling cessation is anticipated as a very distressing, yet inevitable, life event by those who still cycle. The results of this study suggest that campaigns aimed at increasing the awareness and consideration of other road users towards older cyclists, as well as the introduction of clearer and more visible signage could support older cyclists in prolonging their cycling, as well as improving the experience they have as they do cycle. Increasing awareness of the health benefits of cycling could be another means of encouraging people to continue cycling as they age. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Ryan, Jean
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Helena
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosenkvist, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Schmidt, Steven
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cycling in later life: To cycle or not to cycle2015In: TRANSED 2015: Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons / [ed] Rosário Macário, 2015, p. B335-B336Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of introducing measures to increase the modal share of cycling has come to the fore in both policy and research in recent years. The benefits of increased cycling are wide-ranging; with cycling often considered to contribute to more attractive public spaces, increased safety, and more sustainable urban life.

    Different parts of the world are seeing an increase in the modal share of cycling. However, these increases are largely attributed to commuter traffic, with older persons somewhat underrepresented. There is, however, some evidence to suggest that developing strategies for cycling promotion across the lifespan, and particularly into later life, would allow people to continue travelling by bicycle as they age. While much is known about the car and the importance of the car in facilitating mobility in later life, much less is known about cycling and its role in the mobility of older persons.

    Employing a mixed method approach, this study aims to gain a greater insight into cycling as a mode of transport among those in later life. The study explores (1) the key differences between older cyclists and older noncyclists; (2) the perceptions of older cyclists in relation to cycling as a mode of transport; and (3) the factors which are associated with cycling cessation in later life.

    Malmö, a city in the south of Sweden with a strong emphasis on bicycle planning, is the study area. The city of Malmö is an interesting case as Malmö Municipality has put a strong emphasis on its aim for cycling to be apart of its inhabitants’ everyday lives.

    A survey aimed to capture the trends at play when it comes to cycling among those aged 65-85 living in Malmö city (N = 456). Two focus groups were carried out in order to gain a deeper insight into older persons’ perspectives and perceptions with respect to cycling. The focus group discussion guide comprised two main themes: ‘Reasons for cycling/not cycling’; and ‘The cycling experience in Malmö’.

    The key differences between older cyclists and older non-cyclists were focused around the factors of gender; health and activity; mobility opportunities; and life course and intentions.

    Cycling cessation was associated with those who do not participate in all desired activities, those who do not have access to a car in the household and those who do not associate cycling with health. The only variable associated with a higher odds of having ceased cycling was age, meaning that, by and large, the older the respondent the more likely he/she is to have ceased cycling.

    The study’s findings illustrated the very positive and important role cycling can play in the mobility of older persons in the city of Malmö. It is not only possible but also mostly enjoyable for many older people to cycle. Cycling is a facilitator of activities and is largely associated with convenience and ease.

    There are clear differences between cyclists and non-cyclists, with the former generally having a wider range of mobility opportunities available to them. Cycling cessation is anticipated as a very distressing, yet inevitable, life event by those who still cycle.

    The results of this study suggest that campaigns aimed at increasing the awareness and consideration of other road users towards older cyclists, as well as the introduction of clearer and more visible signage could support older cyclists in prolonging their cycling, as well as improving the experience they have as they do cycle. Increasing awareness of the health benefits of cycling could be another means of encouraging people to continue cycling as they age.

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