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  • 1.
    Al Jawaheri, Raad
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Negative impact of lake liming programmes on the species richness of dragonflies (Odonata): a study from southern Sweden2017In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 788, no 1, p. 99-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liming programmes aiming to restore fish populations are being implemented in many acidified aquatic systems in northern Europe. We studied Odonata communities in 47 forest lakes in SW Sweden, 13 that are currently being limed, and 8 that have previously been limed. Thirty-one species were recorded, with the highest mean number in untreated lakes, followed by previously treated lakes and currently treated lakes. Species communities differed between untreated and limed lakes, but only few rare species found in the untreated lakes were absent in the treated lakes. Likewise, species known to thrive in acid environments were either rare or showed no preferences. Comparing the number of records of odonate species within a large regional area to the proportion of lakes inhabited in our study, we found that seven of the most commonly observed species occurred less frequently in limed lakes than in the untreated ones, including two of the three most common taxa. Reduced species numbers in limed lakes might be due to conditions on other trophic levels, including fish predation. We argue that Odonata should be considered when developing new biological indices of water quality, although the causes of the observed occurrence patterns need to be studied further. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  • 2.
    Andersen, Emelie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Nilsson, Bertil
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), MPE-lab.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Survival possibilities of the dragonfly Aeshna viridis (Insecta, Odonata) in southern Sweden predicted from dispersal possibilities2016In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 179-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use public records from 1980 to 2014 to analyse survival of the EU Annex IV species Aeshna viridis in Sweden, a dragonfly strongly associated with the plant Stratiotes aloides. We clustered localities with S. aloides based on assumed dispersal abilities of A. viridis, using a dispersing radius of 2–100 km, calculating the proportion of sites with S. aloides that A. viridis is able to reach. If mean dispersal capability is high (40 km or above) 92.6 % or more of the localities are connected. For a good disperser, the probability of long-time survival is good. We further analysed the species richness of other Odonata and aquatic plants at 98 localities from the dataset. A. viridis co-occurred with more Odonata in the presence of S. aloides and running water but not in lakes. S. aloides sites had a higher number of other aquatic plants. Area had no impact on the occurrence of the species. For the present situation we surveyed 32 localities with known occurrence of the species. Only half of the sites for S. aloides contained any specimens while A. viridis occurred in the same number of sites. The species co-occurred in only 8 of 32 sites. In four sites A. viridis larvae appeared among Menyanthes trifoliata, Phragmites australis, Potamogeton natans and Sphagnum spp., indicating that at high latitudes A. viridis breeds among other species. Indirect monitoring based only on S. aloides would underestimate the number of populations of the dragonfly. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  • 3.
    Dalzochio, Marina Schmidt
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Description of the final stadium larva of Erythrodiplax media (Odonata: Libellulidae) with preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus2018In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Erythrodiplax media is described and illustrated based on two exuviae of reared larvae and one final stadium larva collected in Xangri-lá, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The larva of E. media can be distinguished from other species of Erythrodiplax by the presence of lateral spines on S8 and S9, the number of premental setae (n = 22), palpal setae (n = 7) and by the mandibular formula. We also provide a preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus. © 2018 Worldwide Dragonfly Association.

  • 4.
    Flenner, Ida
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Olne, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Suhling, Frank
    Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Predator-induced spine length and exocuticle thickness in Leucorrhinia dubia (Insecta: Odonata): a simple physiological trade-off?2009In: Ecological Entomology, ISSN 0307-6946, E-ISSN 1365-2311, Vol. 34, p. 735-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Morphological defence structures evolve against predators but are costly to the individual, and are induced only when required. A well-studied example is the development of longer abdominal spines in dragonfly larvae in the presence of fish. Numerous attempts to discover trade-offs between spine size and behaviour, development time or body size have, however, produced little evidence.

    2. We considered a physiological trade-off. Spines consist of cuticle and using material to build longer structures may result in less material remaining elsewhere. We therefore measured exocuticle thickness at nine locations on Leucorrhinia dubia larvae from habitats with and without fish.

    3. Our results show a significant effect of the interaction between fish presence and spine length on head and fore leg exocuticle thickness. Relative thickness increased with relative length of lateral spine 9 in the absence of fish, whereas no such relationship existed with fish. Hence, synthesis and secretion of cuticle material occur as a trade-off when larvae react to fish presence.

    4. We assume the mechanism to be a selective synthesis of material with different responses in different parts of the larval body. These findings offer a new angle to the fish/spine trade off debate.

     

     

  • 5.
    Flenner, Ida
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Dragonfly community re-organisation in boreal forest lakes: rapid species turnover driven by climate change?2008In: Insect Conservation and Diversity, ISSN 1752-458X, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. Climate change affects many ecosystems on earth. If not dying out or migrating, the species affected have to survive the altered conditions, including changes in community structure. It is, however, usually difficult to distinguish changes caused by a changing climate from other factors.
    2. Forestry is considered to be the major disturbance factor in Swedish forests. Here, we use forest lake data sets from 1996 and 2006 which include species abundance data for dragonfly larvae, water plant structure, forest age and forestry measures during a period of 25 years: from 1980 to 2005. Hence, we were able to discriminate between forestry effects and changes in species composition driven by recent climate change.
    3. We explored effects on regional species composition, species abundance and ecosystem functions, such as changes in niche use, utilising dragonflies (Odonata) as model organisms.
    4. Our results show that dragonflies react rapidly to climate change, showing strong responses over such a short time span as 10 years. We observed changes in both species composition and abundance; former rare species have become more frequent and now occur in lakes of a wider quality range, while former widespread species have become more selective in their choice of waters. The new communities harbour about the same number of species as before, but seen from a regional perspective, diversity is reduced.
    5. We predict that the altered species composition and abundance might raise new demands in conservation planning as well as altering the ecological functions of the aquatic systems.
  • 6.
    Hedström, Ingemar
    et al.
    Boston University, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston, MA, United States.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    An extended description of the larva of Megaloprepus caerulatus from Costa Rica (Odonata: Pseudostigmatidae)2003In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Megaloprepus caerulatus is described and illustrated from specimens collected near the northern border of Barbilla National Park on the Costa Rican Caribbean slope. Habits and characters of larvae of three different size classes obtained from artificial tree holes permit the identification of small (body length 4 mm, excluding the caudal lamellae) larvae up to the final stadium. New diagnostic characters include the shape of the prementum and head. © 2003 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 7.
    Hedström, Ingemar
    et al.
    Boston University, Boston, USA.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    The dry season governs the reproduction of three pseudostigmatid zygopterans in Costa Rica: (Odonata Pseudostigmatidae)2007In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large Neotropical zygopterans Megaloprepus caerulatus, Mecistogaster linearis and M. ornata (Pesudostigmatidae) were surveyed during five years, and striking differences in their reproduction patterns were shown: (1) At two study sites in seasonal, tropical semi-dry forests in Pacific Costa Rica, adult M. ornata could be observed throughout the year, occasionally during the dry season up to 24 indivi duals at one time. Larvae were found from the middle to the end of the wet season suggesting a generation time of one year. (2) At two other study sites in aseasonal tropical wet forest in Caribbean Costa Rica, adults of M. caerulatus were observed year round, often in rather low numbers. Larvae of this species as well as M. linearis appeared throughout the year. While dry periods and rainfall certainly are key factors in governing the reproductive patterns of these species in relation to the climatic regimes of their preferred life zones, it is also concluded that competition from other container dwellers, including tadpoles of poison arrow frogs, may be additional factors in explaining their seasonal variation. It is also argued that all three species seem to have a high plasticity in their life cycles and hence are able to adapt to local conditions rather than displaying the same behaviour throughout their range.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Maria
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Koch, Kamilla
    University of Mainz.
    Continuous and stepwise oocyte production in Libellulidae (Anisoptera)2010In: Odonatologica, ISSN 0375-0183, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 107-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to other insect groups, libellulids have a rather high mean number of ovarioles. In addition, the mean ovariole diameter differs greatly between and within species. In general, 2 different types of ovariole arrangement exist: (1) all developing oocytes mature and equal in size; in some species without, and in others with, surrounding connective tissue and (2) oocytes displaying gradual maturation, with only the outermost ovarioles mature. These differences have ecological consequences: the first arrangement occurs in spp. that have stepwise egg production. These spp. will lay one or more clutches, after which an interclutch interval of ovariole regrowth follows. Spp. with the second arrangement have continuous egg production and are able to lay at least some eggs all the time, reducing the length of interclutch intervals. However, no direct connection between mate-guarding strategies and ovariole arrangements can be seen. Nevertheless, it is believed that the process of ovariole maturation differs between these groups. It is concluded that ovary morphology in libellulids may exhibit evolutionary fixed traits, although the whole picture still remains complex. The ovariole arrangement may have a crucial impact on the reproductive ecology of the species.

  • 9.
    Koch, Kamilla
    et al.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Dept Ecol, D-55128 Mainz, Germany .
    Fuchs, Nadine
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Dept Ecol, D-55128 Mainz, Germany .
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Morphology of follicle cells of Libellulidae (Odonata)2011In: International journal of odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 257-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In libellulids, mature oocyte size varies within and between individual ovaries. The regulating mechanism is not yet understood. Variations in the contents of the follicle cells, and thereby their ability to secrete material into the oocyte, might explain some of the observed differences in oocyte size. We therefore investigated the follicle cell surface, the interstitial space width between follicle cells and between follicle cells and oocytes, the number of nuclei, and the cell compartment proportions using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In all investigated species, the follicle cells were covered by a basal lamina. We found cytoplasmic microvilli and septate junctions. As we could not find any pores or other structures on the cell surface, endocytosis seems to be the only mechanism transporting material into the follicle cells. Larger follicle cells had larger interstitial gaps between follicle cells and oocytes, larger nuclei and a larger mitochondrial area. Larger interstitial spaces between follicle cells and oocytes may afford more room that can be filled with material from the follicle cell layer. More mitochondria could provide more energy/ATP needed for the transport of the material. The quantity of free ribosomes and the mean number of nuclei seemed to be even more important to the productivity of the follicle cell. All these variations in cell contents cause productivity differences among follicle cells and may explain some of the size differences between oocytes within individual ovaries in libellulids.

  • 10.
    Koch, Kamilla
    et al.
    University of Mainz.
    Quast, Malte
    Waldweg 8, 38176, Wendeburg, Germany.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Morphological differences in the ovary of Libellulidae (Odonata)2009In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All female Odonata have been assumed to produce oocytes continuously during their mature life span. However, a recent study of ovariole orientation and development led to the suggestion that Libellulidae are divided into two groups of species, one with continuous, the other with stepwise oocyte production. To find more evidence of this division, we compared the size variation and growth within the vitellarium of the ovary, studying oocytes, and follicle cells. We found that morphological characters discriminate between the two ovary types in eight of the 10 investigated species. In both types we found an increase in all measurements from the anterior to the posterior end of the vitellarium. The increase in oocyte width and follicle cell length was significantly higher in species with a continuous oocyte production. We also noted that follicle cells may have more than one nucleus and that their number can vary during vitellogenesis. Our study confirmed the hypotheses that two different ovary types exist in Libellulidae. The two species not fitting into this grouping could be an artefact of small samp le size due to intraspecific phenotypic plasticity, or else there might be more than two ovary groups, or even a continuum. We could not offer an explanation as to how the process of stepwise oocyte production differs from continuous based production on morphological characters.

  • 11.
    Koch, Kamilla
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Wagner, Christine
    Department of Ecology, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Farmland versus forest: comparing changes in Odonata species composition in western and eastern Sweden2014In: Insect Conservation and Diversity, ISSN 1752-458X, E-ISSN 1752-4598, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Despite the loss of natural ecosystems in the developed world during the past millennia, anthropogenic landscapes still sustain much biodiversity. Our question was, whether ten year changes in regional Odonata faunas are comparable between farmland and forested areas, or if the species pool of farmland areas respond in other ways than that of forest.

    2. We used data of dragonfly larvae collected from 16 lakes in a farmland area in south-western Sweden in the years 2002 and 2011/12, and compared these to data from 34 lakes in a forest area in south-eastern Sweden in the years 1996 and 2006.

    3. The species-richness in the agricultural region increased by 17% but decreased by 13% in the forested region. The changes in occurrence and regional distribution were similar in both areas, affecting 71% and 69% of the species pool. Average extinction rates were comparable between the agricultural and the forested region (38% and 43%) while colonisation rates differed greatly (64% and 114%).

    4. The species composition differed between the regions; the forest lakes harboured a 29% larger species pool. It is possible that in the forested region, the regional species pool in areas surrounding the study sites could stabilise the extinction and have a positive effect on changes in species composition. We assume that the different habitat structures of the waters in the agricultural and the forest regions and changes in temperature are the main driving forces behind the shifts. The mean seasonal air temperature has increased by circa 0.5°C in both regions, when comparing ten-year periods before each sampling year.

  • 12.
    Kohli, Manpreet K
    et al.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, USA.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Kuhn, William R.
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA.
    Ware, Jessica L.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University-Newark, Newark, USA.
    Extremely low genetic diversity in a circumpolar dragonfly species, Somatochlora sahlbergi (Insecta: Odonata: Anisoptera)2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, p. 1-10, article id 15114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first empirical treatment of the northernmost breeding dragonfly, Somatochlora sahlbergi. We sequenced populations from United States, Canada, Finland, Sweden and Norway for cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D2 region of 28s. We found that, despite geographic barriers across its vast arctic range, S. sahlbergi is a single species. Not only does it appear to interbreed across its entire range, there also seems to be almost no variation among European and North American populations in their COI gene fragment (the barcode gene), which is usually extremely variable. We further found that characters thought to be diagnostic for the larvae of S. sahlbergi were absent in our European samples. We review and re-describe the habitat of this species based on new findings from recent field observations. Finally, we report for the first time the likely presence of this species in Japan. We hope our findings will encourage further study of this species and other under-studied insect taxa that inhabit the remote Arctic.

  • 13.
    Korkeamäki, Esa
    et al.
    Water and Environment Association of the River Kymi, Kouvola, Finland.
    Elo, Merja
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Salmela, Jukka
    Regional Museum of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Suhonen, Jukka
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Regional variations in occupancy frequency distributions patterns between odonate assemblages in Fennoscandia2018In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e02192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Odonate (damselfly and dragonfly) species richness and species occupancy frequency distributions (SOFD) were analysed in relation to geographical location in standing waters (lakes and ponds) in Fennoscandia, from southern Sweden to central Finland. In total, 46 dragonfly and damselfly species were recorded from 292 waterbodies. Species richness decreased to the north and increased with waterbody area in central Finland, but not in southern Finland or in Sweden. Species occupancy ranged from 1 up to 209 lakes and ponds. Over 50% of the species occurred in less than 10% of the waterbodies, although this proportion decreased to the north. In the southern lakes and ponds, none of the species occurred in all lakes, whereas in the north many species were present in all of the studied waterbodies. The dispersal ability of the species did not explain the observed species occupancy frequencies, but generalist species with a large geographical range occurred in a higher percentage of the waterbodies. At Fennoscandian scale, we found that the unimodal satellite pattern was predominant. However, at smaller scale, we found geographical variations in odonate species SOFD patterns. The most southern communities followed the unimodal satellite-dominant pattern, whereas in other regions communities fitted best with the bimodal core - satellite patterns. It seems that the richer species pool in the southern locations, and the larger distribution range of the northern species, skewed the unimodal pattern into a bimodal satellite dominant pattern. © 2018 The Authors.

  • 14.
    Pires, Mateus Marques
    et al.
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Predicting the effects of future climate change on the distribution of an endemic damselfly (Odonata, Coenagrionidae) in subtropical South American grasslands2018In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is predicted to affect the distribution of freshwater taxa, and stronger impacts are expected on endemic species. However, the effects of future climates on freshwater insects from the Neotropical region have been generally overlooked. In this study, the distribution of a damselfly (Cyanallagma bonariense, Odonata, Coenagrionidae) endemic to the subtropical South American grasslands (Pampa) was modelled in relation to future scenarios of high greenhouse gas emissions (RCP 8.5) for 2050 and 2070. For this purpose, ecological niche models were developed based on assumptions of limited dispersal and niche conservatism, and the projected distribution of C. bonariense was contrasted with the location of current protected areas (PAs) in the Pampa. A broad potential distribution of C. bonariense was indicated throughout the Pampa, and projections predicted a predominance of range contractions rather than range shifts in climatically suitable areas for C. bonariense in 2050 and 2070. Projections of suitable areas overlapped in central Argentina and southernmost Uruguay in these periods. Our results indicated a potential resilience of C. bonariense to future climate change, which is likely related to the low restrictions in habitat use of C. bonariense. In every projection, however, most PAs were expected to lose effectiveness, as by 2070 most PAs fall outside the range of the predicted distribution of C. bonariense. Thus, the creation or enlargement of PAs in these areas is recommended and these results represent an important information for the conservation of endemic freshwater insects under global warming scenarios in an overlooked Neotropical landscape. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

  • 15.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brazil.
    Perico, Eduardo
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Dragonflies (Odonata) in Subtropical Atlantic Forest fragments in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: seasonal diversity and composition2013In: Scientia Plena, ISSN 1808-2793, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 012401Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most endangered ecosystems in America is the Atlantic Forest, which demands emergency actions to protect its remnants as well its biodiversity. In this situation the species inventory can develop a management role for the future, determining specific areas that should be preserved as well the species composition and richness can be used as an indicator of a healthy ecosystem. The use of dragonfly species composition has proven its potential indication of quality habitats. The Odonata species actually still poorly known in the Neotropical region and has never been used as a tool to analyze the actual conditions of aquatic environments particularly in the Subtropical Atlantic Forest, which occurs in south of Brazil. A systematic survey was carried out in aquatic systems located at remnants of forest from March 2011 to February 2012. A total of 565 specimens belonging to 34 species, distributed in 5 families were sampled. Libellulidae was dominant, with 14 species, followed by Coenagrionidae, Gomphidae, Lestidae and Aeshnidae. Through inventory survey we deepen the Odonata composition knowledge and performed a statistic analysis.

  • 16.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Ely, Gerson
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Preliminary dragonfly (Odonata) species list from the Pampa biome in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, with ecological notes for 19 new records for the state2017In: Biota Neotropica, ISSN 1806-129X, E-ISSN 1676-0611, Vol. 17, no 4, article id e20170374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inventory of Odonata was carried out in the southern half of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in the Pampa biome. Originally, this biogeographical region was covered mostly by open fields and grassland, with sections of higher vegetation surrounding water bodies and rocky hills. Today the landscape is fragmented due to agricultural activities, mainly cattle farming, rice crops and forest plantations. Our survey was conducted in three municipalities from this region, between March 2015 and April 2016. Aiming at a general overview of the species composition, our sampling sites were selected on a wide basis, including lakes, bogs, temporary water bodies, small streams and river sections. Eighty two species of Odonata were collected comprising 40 genera and seven families. The dominant families were Libellulidae (56,1%), Coenagrionidae (24,5%) and Aeshnidae (7,3%). We found a diverse odonate assemblage, adding 19 new species records for the state of Rio Grande do Sul.

  • 17.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effects of exotic tree plantations on the richness of dragonflies (Odonata) in Atlantic Forest, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2016In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the mixed ombrophilous forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest, which is one of the richest biomes on Earth. This biome currently remains as a highly fragmented mosaic, under pressure from human development. The diversity and ecology of most animal groups in this biome are poorly known. We studied Odonata in a large forest fragment, including an ecological reserve: the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), in Rio Grande do Sul, administrated by the Brazilian government. The reserve is dominated by MOF with sectors of Pinus elliottii and Araucaria angustifolia. Three surveys of these forest sectors over one year yielded 42 species, with the highest species richness recorded in the P. elliottii sector. The odonate species recorded here are all generalist in terms of habitat preferences, but they appeared only in low numbers and were very particular in their occurrence pattern. We therefore assume that the introduction of an alien element in the Atlantic Forest has given rise to a new species assemblage, where the ecology of the species is adapted to the novel habitat of Pinus plantations. As expected, the species occurring in the MOF sectors were mainly habitat specialists. The Araucaria plantations had an intermediate species composition. Despite the differences observed in habitat preference between generalist and specialist species, such exotic plantation habitats may act as a temporary biodiversity reservoir for further habitat colonization. © 2016 Worldwide Dragonfly Association

  • 18.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    List of Odonates from the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA - SFP), with two new distribution records for Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2016In: Biota Neotropica, ISSN 1806-129X, E-ISSN 1676-0611, Vol. 3, article id e20150132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of Odonata was carried out in the National Forest FLONA - SFP, Northeastern region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. This conservation unit is mainly covered by Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of Atlantic Forest biome, being also areas covered in planted Pinus, planted Araucaria and open fields. Our sampling efforts were conducted in thirty aquatic environments inside this reserve during the period between January 2014 and November 2014. The sampling sites were selected randomly, comprehending lakes, bogs, small streams and river sections, all inserted in the four vegetation types occurring in the reserve. Fortysix species of Odonata were collected and grouped into 23 genera and seven families. The dominant families were Coenagrionidae (32%), Libellulidae (32%), Aeshnidae (12%), and, Calopterygidae and Lestidae (9%). As expected, the findings revealed the presence of a highly diverse Odonate assemblage, mainly represented by generalist species in the most human disturbed sectors (Pinus and Open fields) and some specialist species in the pristine forest. Two species were registered for the first time in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: Libellula herculea Karsch, 1889 (Libellulidae) and Heteragrion luizfelipei Machado, 2006 (Heteragrionidae). © 2016, Universidade Estadual de Campinas UNICAMP. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Man-made lakes form species-rich dragonfly communities in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Odonata)2016In: Odonatologica, ISSN 0375-0183, Vol. 45, no 3-4, p. 135-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest and one of the biodiversity hotspots on Earth. We sampled adult Odonata at 30 locations in the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, a national reserve which is divided into several sectors of MOF, planted Araucaria angustifolia, Pinus elliottii used for sustainable and financial purposes, and open fields. There are three types of aquatic environments in the reserve: lakes, swamps, and rivers/streams. Our aim was to obtain an overview of the species’ distribution patterns in the three types of aquatic environments and to evaluate the species occurring in lakes, an exclusively man-made habitat in this area. We recorded 46 species from seven odonate families; 25 species (x = 5.71 ± 1.77 SD) occurring in rivers/ streams, 24 in lakes (11.57 ± 2.15) and 21 in swamps (5.22 ± 3.60). Using Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NmDS), we showed that the species composition differed clearly between the three types of aquatic habitats. While swamps and rivers/streams had a relatively similar and uniform species composition, species in the lakes were more varied but the total species number was almost as high as that of the rivers/streams. The lake communities also differed distinctly from those of the other habitats, and we assume that the lake species originate from other degraded areas in the vicinity, indicating that the remains of the Atlantic Forest has already been strongly altered by humans. Given the poor knowledge of the Odonata in the Atlantic Forest/MOF, we hope that our study may increase the understanding of the communities, and contribute to the development of conservation measures for this fragmented biome.

  • 20.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Martins dos Santos, Daniel
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Consatti, Guilherme
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Dragonflies (Odonata) from the Taquari River valley region, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2015In: Check List, ISSN 1809-127X, E-ISSN 1809-127X, Vol. 11, no 5, article id 1740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of Odonata was carried out in the central region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul: the Taquari River valley. This region was originally covered by deciduous and Semi-deciduous Atlantic Forest, which today only exist in a highly fragmented environment mainly due to agricultural activities. Our survey was conducted in 12 municipalities from this region, between March 2011 and April 2013. Aiming a general overview of the species composition, our sampling sites included lakes, bogs, small streams and river sections, all inside or surrounded by small forest fragments or forest areas. Fifty species of Odonata were collected comprising 29 genera and seven families. The dominant families were Libellulidae (40%) and Coenagrionidae (36%), while Aeshindae, Gomphidae and Lestidae each only comprise 6% of the total number of species. The findings revealed the presence of a highly diverse odonate assemblage, mainly represented by generalist species in human disturbed fragments and a few forest specialist species in the best preserved remnants only.

  • 21.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Water body type and land cover shape the dragonfly communities (Odonata) in the Pampa biome, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2018In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical region known as the Pampa biome in southern Brazil, was originally mainly covered with open fields or grassland, with areas of riparian forest surrounding the water bodies. Today this landscape appears highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming, and forest plantations. Studies have shown that the Pampa biome has high levels of biodiversity and endemism, but with regard to invertebrates, this biome is still one of the least known in Brazil. We therefore designed a study comparing the dragonfly (Odonata) communities to environmental and landscape features in this area, measuring diversity by species richness, relative abundance and Shannon index. Our results showed that the Pampa is a biome very rich in odonates, and that the species communities are highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the area. Habitats such as Rivers/Streams, bordered by native grasslands and riparian forests, were shown to harbour communities that were ecologically more complex and sensitive than other habitat types. Man-made lakes and agricultural areas displayed lower levels of biodiversity and odonate communities dominated by generalist species. By combining data on the communities of Odonata and other taxa, our analyses may be instrumental in determining priority areas for future conservation measures within the area. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 22.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Périco, Eduardo
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Testing Dragonflies as Species Richness Indicators in a Fragmented Subtropical Atlantic Forest Environment2015In: Neotropical Entomology, ISSN 1519-566X, E-ISSN 1678-8052, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We surveyed 15 bodies of water among remnants of the Atlantic Forest biome in southern Brazil for adult dragonflies and damselflies to test whether an empirical selection method for diversity indicators could be applied in a subtropical ecosystem, where limited ecological knowledge on species level is available. We found a regional species pool of 34 species distributed in a nested subset pattern with a mean of 11.2 species per locality. There was a pronounced difference in species composition between spring, summer, and autumn, but no differences in species numbers between seasons. Two species, Homeoura chelifera (Selys) and Ischnura capreolus (Hagen), were the strongest candidates for regional diversity indicators, being found only at species-rich localities in our surveyed area and likewise in an undisturbed national forest reserve, serving as a reference site for the Atlantic Forest. Using our selection method, we found it possible to obtain a tentative list of diversity indicators without having detailed ecological information of each species, providing a reference site is available for comparison. The method thus allows for indicator species to be selected in blanco from taxonomic groups that are little known. We hence argue that Odonata can already be incorporated in ongoing assessment programs in the Neotropics, which would also increase the ecological knowledge of the group and allow extrapolation to other taxa. © 2015, Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil.

  • 23.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Dalzochio, Marina S.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ecoregions within the Brazilian Pampa biome reflected in Odonata species assemblies2019In: Austral ecology (Print), ISSN 1442-9985, E-ISSN 1442-9993, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 461-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on vegetation composition, previous studies of the Pampa biome in southern Brazil have defined seven ecoregions within the area. Here, we test this ecoregion approach studying the semi-aquatic insect group Odonata in five of these regions, aiming at comparing the ecoregions to the more traditional environmental predictors of water quality and land cover. Based on a data set of occupancy comprising 99 species distributed between 131 localities, a one-way Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance was used to compare differences in the species composition between the ecoregions, followed by a Principal Component Analysis to visualize the variation. The composition varied significantly between all groups tested, and the ordination explained 61.8% of the variance. A partial redundancy analysis of ecoregions, land cover and water quality variables explained 71% of the variance in Odonata community structure. Ecoregion was the most important predictor, followed by water quality and land cover. Within these species assemblies, we could select certain species that were representative of a given ecoregion, to which their distribution within the Pampa biome was entirely or mainly confined. Of 24 representative species 41.7% were rare, while the rest were more abundant and, hence, easier to detect. We suspect that the differences found between the Pampa ecoregions might be due to geology, as such factors may be strong determinants of biodiversity. Specific ecological requirements at the family and genus levels also seemed to act selectively on the species compositions within the ecoregions. Today, the Pampa is highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming and forest plantations. We suggest that an ecoregion-based approach to the implementation of conservation measures may be the best way to help these distinct species assemblies survive. © 2018 Ecological Society of Australia

  • 24.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Brink, Joachim
    Halmstad University.
    Florén, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Gaspes, Veronica
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lutz, Mareike
    Halmstad University.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Olsfelt, Jonas
    Halmstad University.
    Svensson, Bertil
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ericsson, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hylander, Jonny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Sandberg, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Benner, Mats
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Bergvall, Patrik
    Halmstad University.
    Carlborg, Anna
    Halmstad University.
    Fleischer, Siegfried
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Hållander, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Mattsson, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Olsson, Charlotte
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Waara, Sylvia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Weisner, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    ARC13 – Assessment of Research and Coproduction: Reports from the assessment of all research at Halmstad University 20132014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    During 2013, an evaluation of all the research conducted at Halmstad University was carried out. The purpose was to assess the quality of the research, coproduction, and collaboration in research, as well as the impact of the research. The evaluation was dubbed the Assessment of Research and Coproduction 2013, or ARC13. (Extract from Executive Summary)

  • 25.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Specialists vs. generalists in the Odonata - the importance of forest environments in the formation of diverse species pools2005In: Forests and dragonflies: fourth WDA International Symposium of Odonatology, Pontevedra (Spain), July 2005 / [ed] Adolfo Cordero Rivera, Sofia-Moscow: Pensoft Publishers , 2005, p. 153-179Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Bernard, Rafal
    Department of General Zoology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Rivera, Adolfo Cordero
    Departamento de Ecoloxía e Bioloxía Animal, Universidade de Vigo, EUET Forestal, Campus Universitario, Pontevedra, Spain.
    Ketelaar, Robert
    Dutch Butterfly Conservation / Dutch Society for the Preservation of Nature, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Suhling, Frank
    Institute of Geoecology, Dpt of Environmental System Analysis, Technical University of Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Critical species of Odonata in Europe2004In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 385-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The status of the odonate fauna of Europe is fairly well known, but the current IUCN Red List presents only six species out of ca 130, two of which are actually out of danger today. In this paper we propose a tentative list of 22 possibly declining or threatened species in the region. For the majority, reliable data of population size and possible decline is still lacking. Also 17 endemic species are listed, most occurring in the two centres of endemism in the area: the south-eastern (mountains and islands) and the western Mediterranean. These species should receive extra attention in future updates of the world Red List due to their limited distribution. The extreme variation in biomes and the human exploitation of habitats make conservation planning complicated in Europe. Within the EU, the FFH directive is a working tool aiding conservation. However, the species included do not fully correspond to those on the current Red List, nor to those discussed in this paper. We believe that future conservation efforts should focus on the most valuable and threatened habitats in each sub-region. Active conservation measures could be implemented on a European scale, provided that research will establish a solid ground for such measures. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 27.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Haase, Susann
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geookol, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Suhling, Frank
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Geookol, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Morphology of dragonfly larvae along a habitat gradient: interactions with feeding behaviour and growth (Odonata: Libellulidae)2008In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown that life history, behavioural as well as morphological traits vary with the habitats occupied by odonate larvae. Here we ask the following questions: (1) Are the morphological traits, which are associated with perception and foraging, related to the larval habitat? (2) Do these traits influence foraging success and growth rate? We analysed the morphology of species pairs belonging to the genera Crocothemis, Orthetrum and Trithemis; one species in each pair occurring in perennial spring-fed streams, the other able to develop in temporary waters. A PCA reveals four principal components of morphological characters which may be expressed as PC1: prey handling, PC2: visual perception, and PC3 and PC4: density of long and short setae on the feet. The variances of PC1, PC2 and PC3 were affected by phylogeny. PC1, PC2 and PC4 differed between habitats. Species of perennial springs had larger values for visual perception. These waters are clear and larger eyes should be beneficial. But, a high PC2 value was associated with low growth rate and did not affect foraging success. We therefore conclude that investment in better sight made by perennial water species may reflect the need of avoiding predators. Development in temporary waters mainly requires rapid growth and species may not be capable to invest also in visual perception. PC1 was negatively correlated with foraging behaviour and PC3 was positively so. This indicates the importance of prey capture mode to foraging success, which may, however, not translate into a higher growth rate.

  • 28.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Hedström, Ingemar
    Boston University, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston, MA, USA.
    The larva of Mecistogaster linearis, with notes on its abundance in lowland rainforest of Costa Rica (Odonata: Pseudostigmatidae)2005In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Mecistogaster linearis is described and illustrated from specimens collected within or near the Río Dantas Wildlife Refuge at the north-western border of the Barbilla National Park on the Costa Rican Caribbean slope. Characters of F-0 larvae permit easy separation from Megaloprepus caerulatus, a species coexisting with M. linearis. Diagnostic characters include overall colour, shape of head, prementum and caudal gills. Exuviae may be determined using shape of mandibles. Two types of branched setae are present on tibiae and tarsi. Most are 3-branched but on front tarsi they are instead feather-shaped. It is suggested that these setae are used for eye-cleaning. M. linearis was a relatively rare but regularly occurring species in the study area throughout the 3-year study period. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 29.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Kalkman, Vincent J.
    Boudot, Jean-Pierre
    Bernard, Rafał
    Conze, Klaus-Jürgen
    De Knijf, Geert
    Dyatlova, Elena
    Ferreira, Sónia
    Jovic, Miloš
    Ott, Jürgen
    Riservato, Elisa
    European Red List of Dragonflies2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Red List is a review of the conservation status of c.6,000 European species (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, freshwater fishes, butterflies, dragonflies, and selected groups of beetles, molluscs, and vascular plants) according to IUCN regional Red Listing guidelines. It identifies those species that are threatened with extinction at the regional level – in order that appropriate conservation action can be taken to improve their status. This Red List publication summarises results for European Dragonflies.

  • 30.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Suhling, Frank
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische UniversitätBraunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Martens, Andreas
    Institut für Biologie und Schulgartenentwicklung, Pädagogische Hochschule Karlsruhe,Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Gorb, Stanislav N.
    Zoological Institute: Functional Morphology and Biomechanics, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Fincke, Ola M.
    Ecologyand Evolutionary Biology Program, Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, U.S.A..
    For consistency’s sake? A reply to Bybee et al.2016In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 307-308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    et al.
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effect of tree plantations on the functional composition of Odonata species in the highlands of southern Brazil2018In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 808, no 1, p. 283-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in biodiversity have mainly been assessed using taxonomical diversity indices. Although these approaches contribute to the scientific understanding of species richness and composition patterns, trait-based metrics may be more useful for detecting responses to land use change. We used odonates as a model system to compare traits composition in mixed ombrophilous forest (MOF) and tree plantations: exotic species (Pinus sp.) and native species (Araucaria angustifolia). Our goal was to understand and compare how each vegetation type affects the selection of species traits, and which factors are responsible for the presence of the species in the environment. We recorded 36 Odonata species distributed across 14 functional groups. The functional composition varied between MOF and exotic tree plantations and was similar between these two habitats and native tree plantations. Native forest favoured specialist traits. Our results suggest that the conversion of MOF to tree plantations, especially exotic ones, results in a shift to less specialized Odonata communities with altered functional group composition. This result highlights the negative impact associated with the conversion of native forests into exotic plantations. Our results show that odonates with specialist traits are limited to natural forest sites, which makes the conservation of such areas crucial. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature

  • 32.
    Suhling, Frank
    et al.
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany .
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Gorb, Stanislav
    Spezielle Zoologie, Universität Kiel, Kiel, Germany .
    Kalkman, Vincent
    Nederlands Centrum voor Biodiversiteit Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe
    Nederlands Centrum voor Biodiversiteit Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    van Tol, Jan
    Nederlands Centrum voor Biodiversiteit Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Order Odonata2015In: Thorp and Covich's Freshwater Invertebrates: ecology and general biology / [ed] James H. Thorp & D. Christopher Rogers, Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2015, p. 894-932Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces the insect order Odonata. It provides the most recent phylogeny and up-to-date systematics as well as genera and species numbers of the various families in the biogeographic regions. We also present an overview about the general biology, ecology and behavior of Odonata. This includes details on morphology and ultrastructures. We also attempt an updated categorization of odonate life cycle types. The subchapters on ecology and behavior focus on various aspects of habitat selection and microhabitat occupancy, including effects of biotic interactions and antipredation behavior. Finally, we summarize collection and sampling methods for adult and larval Odonata. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  • 33.
    Suhling, Frank
    et al.
    Dept. of Environ. System Analysis, Institut für Geoökologie, TU Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 19c, DE-38102 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Kasperski, Judith
    Dept. of Environ. System Analysis, Institut für Geoökologie, TU Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 19c, DE-38102 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Gaedecke, Dunja
    Dept. of Environ. System Analysis, Institut für Geoökologie, TU Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 19c, DE-38102 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Behavioural and life history traits in temporary and perennial waters: comparisons among three pairs of sibling dragonfly species2005In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 609-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying and examining traits that influence the distribution of species is crucial to the understanding of community structure. Theory predicts that traits should differ between species that live in temporary and permanent waters because of differing major environmental variables; viz drying out and predator presence, respectively. Species, however, will also be influenced by their evolutionary history, i.e. by the traits of their common ancestors. We studied differences in life history and behaviour traits in a series of laboratory experiments using pairs of dragonfly species out of three genera of Namibian Libellulidae (Odonata) with one species from each type of habitat. As predicted, growth rates were significantly higher in the temporary water species compared to the permanent water species. Activity and foraging, in contrast, differed between the genera, but did not differ between the habitat types. Hence, our study implies that the behavioural traits are influenced by phylogenetic inertia rather than by the habitat variables, while growth rate is adapted to the habitat. We argue that in all three genera one species has diverged recently from a sister species that lives in the original habitat of the genus, which may be temporary waters in Crocothemis Brauer and in Orthetrum Newman, and permanent waters in Trithemis Brauer. The behavioural traits may therefore be less well adapted. Rapid growth may be the more relevant trait because it is crucial to survival in temporary waters.

  • 34.
    Suhling, Frank
    et al.
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 19c, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Martens, Andreas
    Biology, Karlsruhe University of Education, Bismarckstrasse 10, D-76133 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Marais, Eugene
    National Museum of Namibia, Windhoek, P.O. Box 1203, Windhoek, Namibia.
    Schütte, Carsten
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Langer Kamp 19c, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Dragonfly Assemblages in Arid Tropical Environments: A Case Study from Western Namibia2006In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 311-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dragonflies have been proposed as indicators for the ecosystem health of freshwater wetlands. For their useful functioning as indicators it is, however, necessary to identify species compositions in specific habitats and species-habitat associations, particularly in the tropics, where such knowledge is still weak. We examined the dragonfly species composition of 133 localities in the arid environment of western Namibia. An analysis of nestedness indicated that distinct, and predictable patterns of species associations can be expected. Discriminant analyses revealed that most of the nine habitat types separated by structural and hydrological parameters are well discriminated by their dragonfly assemblages. Spring brooks in particular host a specific assemblage, which is threatened due to the habitat restriction of several species, as well as by recent habitat loss and degradation. Using a hierarchical method of several criteria we demonstrated the selection of a set of potential indicator species from the species set, most of these being useful indicators for spring brook assemblages. The conservation status of certain habitats and species is discussed. We propose that dragonflies will have a high indicator potential for threatened freshwater wetlands in such areas and may also serve as an indication of the sustainable use of water resources including evaluating measures to rehabilitate environments.

  • 35.
    Svensson, Jonas M.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Strand, John A.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Rikare mångfald och mindre kväve: Utvärdering av våtmarker skapade med stöd av lokala investeringsprogram och landsbygdsutvecklingsstöd2004Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På uppdrag av Naturvårdsverket och Jordbruksverket har Våtmarkscentrum, Högskolan i Halmstad, utvärderat svenska våtmarker anlagda med landsbygdsutvecklingsstöd, LBU-stöd (Miva, projektstöd och Lmiva utan projektstöd) respektive våtmarker anlagda inom lokala investeringsprogram (LIP) avseende näringsretention och biologisk mångfald. Resultaten från utvärderingen redovisas separat för de fyra olika grupperna/kategorierna av anlagda våtmarker enligt nedan (fetstil anger kategorihänvisning i text, tabeller och figurer):

    • Våtmarker anlagda med anläggningsstöd inom Lokala investeringsprogram 1998 - 2002, LIP.

    • Våtmarker anlagda med anläggningsstöd inom LBU-projektstöd (dessa våtmarker får vanligen även skötselstöd, Lmiva), 2000 - 2002.

    • Våtmarker anlagda 1996-1999, utan anläggningsstöd men med skötselstöd (Miljöstöd), Miva.

    • Våtmarker anlagda från år 2000 - , utan anläggningsstöd men med skötselstöd (LBU-våtmarker som endast får skötselersättning), Lmiva.

    Syftet har främst varit att utvärdera och jämföra hur våtmarksanläggning inom olika stödformer har bidragit till minskad övergödning och ökad biologisk mångfald. Syftet har alltså inte varit att utvärdera enskilda våtmarker utan att ge en helhetsbild för olika stödformer och regioner. Därför har det varit nödvändigt att basera utvärderingen på data för ett stort antal våtmarker. Detta innebär att utförliga mätningar ej kunnat genomföras inom de enskilda objekten. Närsaltsretention har därför beräknats baserat på modeller och biologisk mångfald har undersökts genom att trollsländor använts som indikatorgrupp.

    Inom uppdraget har, med jordbruksstöd, registrerats information om totalt 908 våtmarksobjekt om totalt 2860 ha ersatt yta fördelat på 1815 ha Miva, 920 ha projektstöd och 125 ha Lmiva utan projektstöd. Totalt registrerade våtmarker med stöd från LIP är 274 st, omfattande 439 ha.

    Kompletterande fältstudier har utförts i drygt 100 st våtmarker. Främst är det resultaten från dessa våtmarker som sammanfattas nedan...

  • 36.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Milenkovski, Susann
    Department of Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Berglund, Olof
    Department of Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Wetland creation in agricultural landscapes: Biodiversity benefits on local and regional scales2009In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 142, no 5, p. 964-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetland creation aiming at a simultaneous increase in nutrient retention and species diversity in agricultural landscapes has recently become applied as a catchment-scale compensation measure for past wetland losses. Here, we evaluate if, and to what extend, dual-purpose wetlands benefit local and regional diversity of agricultural landscapes. We analysed composition and α, β, and γ diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages among dual-purpose wetlands in an agricultural region in southwest Sweden in relation to local (water quality, wetland morphology, succession stage, proximity to other aquatic habitats) and landscape parameters (regional connectivity, wetland density). Diversity of mature agricultural ponds was used as a standard to evaluate the value of dual-purpose wetlands. Dual-purpose wetlands sustained α, β, and γ diversity similar to that of natural lentic water bodies in agricultural landscapes in the region and elsewhere. Over 80% of the overall species richness was attributed to β diversity, and each created wetland contributed to overall species accumulation. Ecosystem parameters explained 19% of the compositional variation among assemblages, but were only marginally related to diversity. Wetland density promoted α and γ diversity, while spatial heterogeneity (β) remained equally high, independent of wetland density. Our results indicate that catchment-scale wetland creation for simultaneous retention and diversity purposes benefits the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes, particularly if the density of aquatic habitats is increased by at least 30%.

  • 37.
    Tonderski, Karin S.
    et al.
    IFM div. Ecology, Linkoping University.
    Svensson, J. M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Ekstam, Börje
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Eriksson, Peder
    Länsstyrelsen i Örebro län.
    Fleischer, Siegfried
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Herrmann, Jan
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Våtmarker: Närsaltsfällor och/eller myllrande mångfald?2003In: Vatten: tidskrift för vattenvård, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes the state-of-the-art with respect to wetlands for nutrient removal and biodiversity enhancement, as expressed at a research workshop in December 2002. In the end of 2002, 260 and 884 wetlands had been constructed in Sweden with subsidies from LIP and the European Union, respectively. Most frequently, the aims were to remove nutrients from water and enhance biodiversity. The question raised is if we know how to design multifunctional wetlands. Should a wetland be deep or shallow, with or without macrophytes to be an efficient nutrient sink? Diverging opinions are presented, but generally it appears that fairly shallow wetlands at least partly covered by emergent macrophytes are favourable. The importance of extreme high flows and hydraulic short-circuiting is highlighted, and Danish and Norwegian approaches to wetlands construction are presented. Also, there is a risk that nutrient retaining wetlands develop a fairly trivial flora and fauna unless special care is taken. Intentional establishment of desirable and less common species, as well as creation of a variation of depth gradients to favour such species are such measures. Others are allowing for water level variations, as well as vegetation management such as grazing and harvesting.

  • 38.
    Troast, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America.
    Suhling, Frank
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Jinguji, Hiroshi
    School of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Miyagi University, Miyagi, Japan.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Ware, Jessica
    Department of Biology, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America.
    A Global Population Genetic Study of Pantala flavescens2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0148949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among terrestrial arthropods, the dragonfly species Pantala flavescens is remarkable due to their nearly global distribution and extensive migratory ranges; the largest of any known insect. Capable of migrating across oceans, the potential for high rates of gene flow among geographically distant populations is significant. It has been hypothesized that P. flavescens may be a global panmictic population but no sufficient genetic evidence has been collected thus far. Through a population genetic analysis of P. flavescens samples from North America, South America, and Asia, the current study aimed to examine the extent at which gene flow is occurring on a global scale and discusses the implications of the genetic patterns we uncovered on population structure and genetic diversity of the species. This was accomplished using PCR-amplified cytochrome oxidase one (CO1) mitochondrial DNA data to reconstruct phylogenetic trees, a haplotype network, and perform molecular variance analyses. Our results suggested high rates of gene flow are occurring among all included geographic regions; providing the first significant evidence that Pantala flavescens should be considered a global panmictic population. © 2016 Troast et al.

  • 39.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Department of Systematic Zoology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Department of Systematic Zoology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Morphology and evolution of the cynipoid egg (Hymenoptera)2003In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 247-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe gross egg morphology and provide the first data on eggshell ultrastructure in cynipoids (Hymenoptera) based on species representing three distinctly different life histories: internal parasitoids of endopterygote larvae, gall inducers and phytophagous inquilines (guests in galls). We then use existing phylogenetic hypotheses to identify putative changes in egg structure associated with evolutionary life-history transitions. We find four major structural changes associated with the shift from parasitoids laying their eggs inside a host larva to gall inducers laying their eggs in or on plants: (1) from a narrow and gradually tapering gross form to a distinct division into a stout body and a long and thin stalk; (2) from a thin to a thick eggshell; (3) from a flexible to a rigid endochorion; and (4) from crystal bundles with shifting orientation in the exochorion to layers of parallel crystal rods. By contrast, we find no major changes in egg structure associated with the transition from gall inducers to inquilines. Comparison between pre- and post-oviposition eggs of one gall inducer and one inquiline suggests that mechanical stress during the passage through the egg canal gives rise to numerous tiny stress fractures in the boundary separating the exo- and endochorion. In one of the gall inducers, Diplolepis rosae, that end of the egg, which is inserted into the plant, has a specialized and apparently porous shell that may permit chemical exchange between the embryo and the plant. Other structures that could facilitate chemical communication with the host plant through the eggshell were, however, not observed in the eggs of gall inhabitants.

  • 40.
    Ware, Jessica L.
    et al.
    Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Koch, Kamilla
    Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Evolution of reproductive strategies in libellulid dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera)2012In: Organisms Diversity & Evolution, ISSN 1439-6092, E-ISSN 1618-1077, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Libellulidae, oocyte production has been assumed to be continuous, with periods of egg-laying interspersed with periods of resting/eating; however, recent work suggests that two types of oocyte production are common: either (a) continuous or (b) step-wise. These are mirrored in the arrangement of the ovarioles in the ovaries. Likewise, two types of mate-guarding behavior have been observed in Libellulidae: (1) non–contact guarding and (2) tandem guarding in which the male either hovers above the female or is physically attached to her during oviposition. Using molecular (mitochondrial and nuclear) data we explored the evolution of female reproductive traits, focusing on ovariole morphology, as well as guarding behavior, in Libellulidae. Continuous egg production appears to have evolved more than once, as have tandem and non-contact guarding. We discuss how the evolution of different ovariole types and guarding behavior may have been influenced by habitat instability, dispersal and crowded oviposition sites; thus, migratory behavior or habitat availability may have been the driving force of ovariole evolution.

  • 41.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Strand, John A.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Svensson, Jonas M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Combating eutrophication and biodiversity loss in Sweden: importance of constructed wetlands in the agricultural landscape2007In: Multifunctions of wetland systems, Padua: PAN , 2007, p. 60-61Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of this evaluation show that constructed wetlands in the agricultural landscape are capable of a substantial reduction of the nutrient transport to downstream recipients, but only if properly located. These wetlands will also contribute to an increased biodiversity even if not planned primarily for this purpose. The use of wetlands for multiple functions needs to be developed to motivate large-scale wetland construction.

  • 42.
    Wittwer, Torben
    et al.
    Department of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Lund University.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Suhling, Frank
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Does one community shape the other?: Dragonflies and fish in Swedish lakes2010In: Insect Conservation and Diversity, ISSN 1752-458x, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Freshwater communities are often structured by predation. In permanent lentic freshwater habitats dragonfly larvae aremajor predators which, in return, suffer predation by fish. Antipredator traits vary between the dragonfly species, and the dragonfly communities are therefore shaped by the presence of fish. But fish communities vary, and as different fish species affect dragonflies in different ways, the species composition of the fish community may affect the composition of the dragonfly community.

    2. We sampled dragonfly larvae in 24 lakes with a known fish stock in south-western Sweden, and explored the impact of fish as well as vegetation structure on dragonfly communities by means of multivariate analyses.

    3. We found that the presence of four fish species affected the community structure of dragonflies. The impact strength depended mainly on the abundance of Perca fluviatilis, with which most dragonfly species were negatively correlated. Many dragonfly species were also positively correlated with the occurrence of at least one fish species, which may reflect similar habitat requirements or imply indirect positive effects of these fish species.

    4. Of the 24 recorded dragonfly species, four did not occur in lakes dominated by P. fluviatilis, whereas only one species was lacking in lakes dominated by Rutilus rutilus. The dragonfly species diversity was higher in R. rutilus lakes than in P. fluviatilis lakes.

    5. Our results suggest that the fish species composition is a major determinant of the dragonfly community, which in turn will influence the lower trophic levels.

     

     

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