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  • 1.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Institute for Social Neuroscience, Ivanhoe, Australia.
    Identity and the Elusive self: Western and Eastern Approaches to Being No One2020In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 243-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas about self and identity being illusions have been around for a long time in both Eastern and Western philosophies and psychologies. In this article, I trace the concept of there being no independent self (separate from conscious experience) from its ancient roots in the philosophies of Heraclitus and the Buddha through the Age of Enlightenment (David Hume) to modern times (William James, the Dalai Lama). In sport and exercise psychology, substantial interest has grown in mindfulness practices with little attention paid to its original goal in Buddhism of the realization of no-self. The question is, however, what might be the usefulness of these concepts about the illusory nature of the self and identity in the world of sport and exercise psychology service? © 2020 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

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  • 2.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Working with an anxious and psychologically abused athlete: A mindful, neuropsychotherapy approach2014In: Neuropsychotherapy: Theoretical concepts and clinical applications / [ed] Rossouw, Pieter J., Brisbane: Mediros , 2014, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Hanrahan, Stephanie J.University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Doing exercise psychology2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    A methodology of loving kindness: how interpersonal neurobiology, compassion, and transference can inform researcher–participant encounters and storytelling2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns some central aspects of methodology in qualitative research: the participants’ and investigators’ storytelling, and the main instruments in many interview-based qualitative studies, the researchers themselves. We discuss several ethical and interpersonal aspects of qualitative research encounters between investigators and their interviewee participants. Interviewing research participants is a fundamentally exploitative process, and we make suggestions for how we can temper that exploitation by giving something of value back to our participants and to make sure the well-being of the participant is not compromised by our actions. Many research topics in qualitative studies concern experiences of stress, distress and trauma, and interviewees re-telling their stories may become retraumatised. Such retraumatisation constitutes abuse on the part of the researcher. To counter potential abuse and exploitation, we discuss how researchers, as the central instruments in interview-based investigations, can use knowledge of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic theory and mindful practice to enable them to hold their participants (and their participants’ stories) in loving care and maybe even help in healing processes. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 5.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Barney, Steve T.
    South Utah University, Cedar City, Utah, USA.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, Cambridge, Waikato, New Zealand.
    Mindfully Dynamic Meta-Supervision: The Case of AW and M2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades; Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 330-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In applied sport, exercise, and performance psychology (SEPP), discussions of meta-supervision (i.e., the supervision of supervision, the training of practitioners to become competent supervisors) are at least 20 years old and go back to the first published account of a meta-supervision program (Barney, Andersen, & Riggs, 1996). Even though 20 years have passed since, the topic of meta-supervision is still relatively rare in the literature, often being a small part of some other research or discussion article. For example, Watson, Zizzi, Etzel, and Lubker (2004) mentioned a meta-supervision issue when they reported that 47 percent of the membership of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) had not received any training in supervision. Recently, however, the topic of meta-supervision has begun to emerge, albeit in a small way. There have been calls for more training in supervision processes, along with suggestions for new supervision training models (e.g., Vosloo, Zakrajsek, & Grindley, 2014). Currently, there is a growing literature on peer supervision in our field, but a review of that topic is beyond the scope of this case study (see Chapters 34 and 35 in this volume for examples). Barney and Andersen (2014a) have explicitly addressed the current status and the future of SEPP meta-supervision. These same authors have incorporated mindfulness into a core feature of meta-supervision: the dynamics within the supervisor-supervisee relationship (Barney & Andersen, 2014b). © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  • 6.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. The Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia.
    Gibbs, Petah M.
    Psychological assessment: Projective techniques2024In: Routledge handbook of applied sport psychology: a comprehensive guide for students and practitioners / [ed] David Todd; Ken Hodge; Vikki Krane, Abingdon: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 112-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. The Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia .
    Serra de Queiroz, Fernanda
    Psychodynamic models2024In: Routledge handbook of applied sport psychology: a comprehensive guide for students and practitioners / [ed] David Tod; Ken Hodge; Vikki Krane, Abingdon: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 193-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, North Dunedin, New Zealand.
    A brief impressionistic history of paying attention: The roots of mindfulness2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 5-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia.
    Williams, David
    AFL Players Association, Melbourne, Australia.
    Mindfulness Approaches2020In: Applied sport, exercise, and performance psychology: Current approaches to helping clients / [ed] David Tod & Martin Eubank, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020, p. 70-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Fogaca, J. L.
    et al.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Zizzi, S. J.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Walking multiple paths of supervision in American sport psychology: A qualitative tale of novice supervisees’ development2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 156-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited evidence for what characteristics of supervision delivery facilitate novice supervisees' development. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between supervision-delivery approaches and the perceptions of service-delivery competence development in novice practitioners. The authors interviewed 9 supervisor-supervisee dyads before and after the academic term in which the supervisees had their first applied experiences. Supervisees also completed reflective journal entries regarding their supervisory experiences and development. Data analysis included constant comparative analysis and triangulation of qualitative results with a practitioner-skills inventory. Different approaches to supervision delivery seemed to contribute similarly to novice supervisees' development. Supervisees developed in more areas when the dyads had consistent meetings, close supervisory relationships, feedback, and frequent opportunities for self-reflection and when supervisors adapted the delivery to the supervisees' developmental levels. In addition, factors in supervisees' background, practice, and supervision that contributed to perceptions of service-delivery competence are discussed. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 11. Gibbs, Petah
    et al.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Marchant, Daryl B.
    Institute of Sport, Exercise, and Active Living Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The Athlete Apperception Technique: Manual and Materials for Sport and Clinical Psychologists2017Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gibbs, Petah M.
    et al.
    Private Practice, Melbourne, Australia.
    Marchant, Daryl B.
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Development of a clinical sport projective assessment method: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT)2017In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of applied sport psychology, there is an increasing appreciation for diversity of training models, research methodologies, and therapeutic approaches. For example, psychodynamic formulations and interpretations have begun to appear more frequently in the sport psychology literature. In keeping with emerging psychodynamic viewpoints, we believe the time is right to introduce a qualitative sport-specific projective instrument: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT). The AAT represents a new technique based on psychodynamic theory and established projective test construction principles. It was designed primarily as a clinical tool for practitioners and not as an instrument for quantitative research into personality. It does, however, have potential research applications, especially in clinical sport case study research and narrative analysis investigations. The AAT produces an idiographic understanding of athletes’ characteristics, anxieties, and motivations (both conscious and unconscious). We briefly review the literature on the development of projective techniques, explain the rationale underlying the development of the AAT, and present three sequential studies to explain the AAT image selection procedures that led to the final product. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 13.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The researcher in loving care: Inter-relatedness behind a mindfulness and sport injury prevention study2017In: Being Mindful in Sport and Exercise Psychology, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 215-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    What counts as ”Evidence” in Evidence-Based practice? Searching for some fire behind all the smoke2016In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some sorts of “evidence” in evidence-based practice seem to carry more weight (e.g., randomized controlled trials; RCTs) than others (e.g., case studies) in applied sport and exercise psychology research. In this article we explore some of the shibboleths of evidence-based treatment, and how some “gold standards,” such as RCTs (as they are often used or misused) may, when sub-optimally executed, provide only tenuous, incomplete, and confounded evidence for what we choose to do in practice. We inquire into the relevance and meaningfulness of practitioner-evacuated research and investigations that use flawed statistical reasoning, and we also ask a central question in evaluating evidence: just because some sorts of positive changes can be measured and counted in various treatment outcome research, do they really “count?” © 2016 Association for Applied Sport Psychology

  • 15.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    School of Sport and Exercise Science and the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport(s) Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden;Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To Adjust or Not Adjust: Nonparametric Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Real-World Meaning2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The main objectives of this article are to: (a) investigate if there are any meaningful differences between adjusted and unadjusted effect sizes (b) compare the outcomes from parametric and non-parametric effect sizes to determine if the potential differences might influence the interpretation of results, (c) discuss the importance of reporting confidence intervals in research, and discuss how to interpret effect sizes in terms of practical real-world meaning.

    Design: Review.

    Method: A review of how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes was conducted. Hypothetical examples were then used to exemplify the issues stated in the objectives.

    Results: The results from the hypothetical research designs showed that: (a) there is a substantial difference between adjusted and non-adjusted effect sizes especially in studies with small sample sizes, and (b) there are differences in outcomes between the parametric and non-parametric effect size formulas that may affect interpretations of results.

    Conclusions: The different hypothetical examples in this article clearly demonstrate the importance of treating data in ways that minimize potential biases and the central issues of how to discuss the meaningfulness of effect sizes in research. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 16.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Things We Still Haven’t Learned (So Far)2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 449-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is like an immortal horse that some researchers have been trying to beat to death for over 50 years, but without any success. In this article we discuss the flaws in NHST, the historical background in relation to both Fisher’s and Neyman-Pearson’s statistical ideas, the common misunderstandings of what p < .05 actually means, and the APA Manual’s (2010) clear, but most often ignored, instructions to report effect sizes and interpret what they all mean in the real world. Also, we discuss how Bayesian statistics can be used to overcome some of the problems with NHST. We then analyze quantitative articles in two of the highest impact factor journals in sport and exercise psychology in the last three years (2012–2014) to determine if we have learned what we should have learned decades ago about the use and meaningful interpretations of the statistics we use. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 17.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Altemyr, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    It Pays to Pay Attention: A Mindfulness-Based Program for Injury Prevention with Soccer Players2015In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 319-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which a mindfulness-based program could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of soccer players. A total of 41 junior elite soccer players were randomly assigned to the treatment or the attentional control group. The treatment group took part in a 7-session program based on the mindfulness, acceptance, and commitment (MAC) approach (Gardner & Moore, 2007). The attentional control group was offered 7 sessions of sport psychology presentations with a particular focus on soccer. There were no statistically significant differences in injury rates between the two groups (U (39) = 149.50, z= −1.77, p = .077), but there was a medium effect size (adjusted Cohen´s d = −0.59, approx. 80% CI for d = −0.37 – −0.74). Moreover, 67% of the players in the mindfulness group remained injury-free in comparison to 40% in the control group. This result suggests that an intervention program focusing on strategies for improving attention could decrease injury risk. Recommendations include applying mindfulness exercises in athletes’ daily training to help lower injury risk. © 2015, Copyright © Association for Applied Sport Psychology.

  • 18.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychosocial predictors of sport injury rates: A meta-analysis2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 173-174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport injury prediction research has traditionally focused on physiological and physical factors. Nevertheless, during the last 30 years there has been increased interest in psychosocial factors related to sport injuries. The most cited theoretical model developed to explain psychosocial variables’ influences on injury risk is the model of stress and athletic injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). The model, suggests that personality (e.g., anxiety, hardiness), history of stressors (e.g., life event stress, daily hassles), and coping (e.g., social support resources) will influence athletes’ stress responses (e.g., physiological, attentional changes) that, in turn, are related to injury risk. The aim of the study was to examine the past research on the relationships of the psychosocial variables in the model (i.e., personality, history of stressors, coping, stress responses) on sport injury rates. The literature review resulted in 47 published studies and 180 effect sizes. The results showed that stress responses (r = .22, 80% CI = .14 - .30) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Moreover, history of stressors (r = .12, 80% CI = .11 - .13) and coping (r = -.05, 80% CI = -.03 - -.08) had smaller relationships with injury rates. Finally, the associations of positive (r = .01, 80% CI = -.03 - .04), as well as negative (r = .01, 80% CI = -.01-.03) personality variables on injury rates was marginal. The results support the model’s suggestion that stress responses have a direct relationship with injury, whereas other variables potentially have indirect relationships with injury rates. In line with these findings it is suggested that intervention programs should focus on helping athletes decrease the magnitude of their stress responses. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 19.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention2017In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have suggested that psy- chosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation.

    Objectives: The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interven- tions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention).

    Methods: Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention.

    Results: The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups.

    Conclusion: The results support the model’s suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016 

  • 20.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Karlsson, Jón
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden & Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waldén, Markus
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden & Department of Orthopaedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad-Ystad Hospitals, Sweden.
    Elite female footballers’ stories of sociocultural factors, emotions, and behaviours prior to anterior cruciate ligament injury2019In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 630-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine how players’ perceptions of sociocultural factors and intra- and interpersonal aspects of sporting experiences may have influenced the emotions, cognitions, and behaviours of elite female soccer players prior to the occurrence of ACL injuries. The research questions guiding the study were: (a) how did female elite soccer players perceive that their psychosocial experiences were related to their cognitive, physiological, and emotional states prior to their ACL injuries, and (b) how did the players feel their perceived states influenced their behaviours prior to injury occurrence. The participants consisted of the total population of female players (N = 18) competing in the Swedish women’s elite league, who incurred a total ACL tear during the 2012 season. Using a semi-structured interview guide, all players were interviewed post-season. We represented the data using a storytelling approach of aggregated creative nonfiction. The aggregated stories showed sociocultural rules and expectations of overtraining and placing pressure on athletes to play even if they were not physically or psychologically fit. Responding to pressures with potentially risk-increasing behaviours might raise the probability of becoming injured through a number of pathways. Team managers, coaches, and members of the medical team are recommended to develop environments that stimulate the players to engage in adaptive stress-recovery and risk-decreasing behaviours. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Susanne
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Desires and taboos: Sexual relationships between coaches and athletes2016In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 589-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coach-athlete sexual relationships constitute ethical, behavioral, social, and emotional quandaries that are rarely addressed openly. Most of the current body of research in this area focuses on coaches' sexual harassment and abuse of children and female athletes. In the present article, we discuss legal coach-athlete sexual relationships and adopt a coach perspective. As dual relationships, coach-athlete sexual relationships blur the boundaries between professional roles circumscribed (usually) by ethical codes of conduct and private spheres of love and desire. We explore the problems associated with the limitations of dichotomous right/wrong ethical decision making and discuss additional ways to understand these relationships, accounting for coaches' and athletes' well-being, performance, gendered sexual agency, power, ethical dilemmas, sport policy, and legal implications. Our discussion raises questions about how to open up dialogue and transparency regarding coach-athlete sexual relationships and how to facilitate functional, healthy coach-athlete relationships. Finally, we provide implications for future research that include legal and consensual coach-athlete sexual relationships and advocate transparency, open discussion, and coach education about coach-athlete sexual relationship dilemmas. © The Author(s) 2016.

  • 22.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    On the Swedish road of becoming a professional practitioner in sport and exercise psychology: Students view's, hopes, dreams and worries2019In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 75-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of sport and exercise psychology (SEP) has experienced a steady growth, and the professional practice and training of students has evolved over that time. Based on 2 past studies, the purpose was to describe a 2015 cohort of SEP students’ hopes, dreams, and worries about the future. The authors performed a thematic content analysis of essays from undergraduate students based on cohorts from 1995, 2005, and 2015. The results showed that the most recent students expressed more worries about the current situation in relation to perceptions about the future of their potential professional practice than the past groups. Four tendencies for the future emerged: continued development of applied sport psychology, increased interdisciplinary exchange and integration, inclusion of exercise and health as a vital part of the field, and increased acceptance of cultural variations. Implications for future professional practice and training in SEP are discussed.

  • 23.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Victoria University, Australia.
    Injury Prevention in Sweden: Helping Soccer Players at Risk2005In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effectiveness of a prevention intervention program to lower the incidence of injury for soccer players with at-risk psychosocial profiles. The Sport Anxiety Scale, the Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes, and the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 were used to screen for psychosocial risk factors outlined in the stress and injury model (Williams & Andersen, 1998). Thirty-two high injury-risk players were identified and randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Injuries of participants were reported by their coaches. The intervention program consisted of training in 6 mental skills distributed in 6 to 8 sessions during 19 weeks of the competitive season. The results showed that the brief intervention prevention program significantly lowered the number of injuries in the treatment group compared with the control group. © 2005 Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

  • 24.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Afterword: Where Are We and Where May We Be Headed?2020In: Psychological Bases of Sport Injuries / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson & Urban Johnson, Morgantown: Fitness Information Technology (FiT) Publishing , 2020, 4, p. 311-316Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    A study on the benefits of participation in an electronic tracking physical activity program and motivational interviewing during a three-month period2023In: Movement & sport sciences, ISSN 2118-5735, no 119, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The purpose was to investigate if participation in a three-month electronic tracking outdoor physical activity and a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention led to positive behavioural, psychological, and physiological outcomes. Methods: Based on a two-group pre-post design, 12 middle-aged women and 6 men were randomly assign to an experimental and a control group. Physical activity data were collected by wrist-worn activity sensors, and pre-post data were collected on the GHQ-12, the BREQ-2, body mass, body fat mass and total body muscle. Measures of cardiovascular fitness were taken pre to post. The experimental group was supported through individual MI coaching sessions and resistance-training for use in an outdoor gym. Magnitude based inferences (MBI) were calculated based on the disposition of the confidence limits for the mean differences to the smallest worthwhile changes. Results: The experimental group had a beneficial increase in its physical activity behaviour (steps). The control group had a medium decrease in identified regulation, the experimental group maintained the same level at the post-measure. Conclusion: Few studies have investigated how the combination of MI and the use of activity-tracking devices effect physical and mental health. This study investigates the use of both MI and activity-tracking devices on psychological well-being, motivation, and physical health in an outdoor context. Future research recommendations are given. © 2022 ACAPS

  • 26.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Connection in the Fresh Air: A Study on the Benefits of Participation in an Electronic Tracking Outdoor Gym Exercise Programme2019In: Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, ISSN 1800-8755, E-ISSN 1800-8763, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore whether a six-week intervention, based on participation in outdoor exercise, including activity-tracking devices and combined with individual consulting sessions, can both increase physical activity and yield positive changes in physiological and psychological health measures. A total of six participants, with a mean age of 41.2 (range 33-50 years), completed the ten-week study and the six-week intervention. The full study consisted of a four-week control/baseline and a six-week intervention period in which each participant acted as their own controls. Continuous measures of physical activity data were collected using a wrist-worn activity sensor during the ten-week study, along with pre- and post-measures of cardiovascular fitness, upper-body strength, BMI, general health, and motivation to exercise. The intervention consisted of a resistance-training programme for an outdoor gym and three motivational interviewing sessions. Effect sizes (percentage) for changes pre- to post-training were calculated. The results, because of the small sample size, are presented as individual cases, but the group, as a whole, showed average increases from baseline (pre-) to post-measures in strength (maximum row; 15.33%), time to exhaustion (3.58%), number of steps per day (4%), and autonomous motivation (12%) and average decreases in body weight (-1.08%), fat percentage (-7.58%), strength (chest; -2.5%), and stress symptoms (-2.17%). The six-week intervention programme showed promising results regarding physical activity changes. This study contributes to the limited evidence of the impact of resistance training programmes using outdoor gyms, electronic tracker, and motivational interviewing on physical activity outcomes. © 2019 by the authors.

  • 27.
    Little, Guy C. D.
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Brainy conversations: Mindfully using the language of neuroscience in sport and exercise psychology service2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 155-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. Little, Guy C.D.
    et al.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. The Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia .
    Speed, Harriet D.
    Therapeutic Relationships in Applied Sport Psychology2024In: Routledge handbook of applied sport psychology: a comprehensive guide for students and practitioners / [ed] David Tod; Ken Hodge; Vikki Krane, Abingdon: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 3-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Mannion, Joe
    et al.
    Pepperdine University, Malibu, USA.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Interpersonal mindfulness for athletic coaches and other performance professionals2016In: Mindfulness and performance: Current perspectives in social and behavioral sciences / [ed] Amy L. Baltzell, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016, p. 439-463Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Mannion, Joe
    et al.
    Pepperdine University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Mindfulness, therapeutic relationships, and neuroscience in applied exercise psychology2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark B. Andersen & Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Parker, James
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schough, Camilla
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Erik
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Viberg, Erik
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bärwald, Anton
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Warpman, Sofia
    Halmstad Municipality, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up2019In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, London, UK: BioMed Central, 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

    Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

    Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

    Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behaviour change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

  • 32.
    Parker, James
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Schough, Camilla
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Erik
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Viberg, Erik
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bärwald, Anton
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Warpman, Sofia
    Halmstad Municipality, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up2019In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

    Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

    Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

    Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behavior change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

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  • 33.
    Poczwardowski, Artur
    et al.
    University of Denver, Denver, United States.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia.
    Van Raalte, Judy L.
    Springfield College, Springfield, MA, United States.
    Harwood, Chris
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Si, Gangyan
    Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Tshube, Tshepang
    University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana.
    Noce, Franco
    Universidade Federal De Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    ISSP position stand: competent supervision in sport psychology2023In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 931-950Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervision enhances professional functioning, helps ensure quality services, and fills a gatekeeping function for the profession. This International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) Position Stand synthesises the most pertinent literature on supervision practices relevant to sport psychology (SP), builds on the collective supervision experience of the authors and the present ISSP Managing Council, and offers recommendations for competent, ethical, and culturally safe supervision. Specifically, after defining supervision and describing supervision models and their relational features, we review the scholarly contributions in the areas of supervision content and methods (including tele-supervision), along with cultural, linguistic, ethical, and legal considerations. We conclude with a set of nine postulates that are further operationalised through recommendations for competent supervision practices. © 2023 International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 34.
    Rogerson, Michelle
    et al.
    Heart Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Moving for your heart's sake: Physical activity and exercise for people with cardiac disease2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark Andersen and Stephanie Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Sebbens, Joshua P.
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The mindful sport psychologist: Where did he come from?2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 55-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Serra de Queiroz, Fernanda
    et al.
    University och Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Evenly suspended attention: A psychodynamically oriented and mindful approach2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Serra de Queiroz, Fernanda
    et al.
    Innera Wellbeing & Performance, Brisbane, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia.
    Psychodynamic Approaches2020In: Applied sport, exercise, and performance psychology: Current approaches to helping clients / [ed] David Tod & Martin Eubank, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020, 1, p. 12-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Tibbert, Stephanie J.
    et al.
    Victoria University & Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Overtraining in professional sport: Exceeding the limits in a culture of physical and mental toughness2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark B. Andersen & Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 233-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Tibbert, Stephanie J.
    et al.
    College of Sport and Exercise Science, Institute for Sport, Exercise and Active Living, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Morris, Tony
    College of Sport and Exercise Science, Institute for Sport, Exercise and Active Living, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    What a difference a “Mentally Toughening” year makes: The acculturation of a rookie2014In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 17, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study investigated how one subculture's norms, traditions, ideals, and imperatives influenced the attitudes, beliefs, emotions, and behaviours of a young athlete (Joe) as he moved from resistance to acculturation.

    Design: Longitudinal case study of one athlete in one specific sport subculture.

    Method: Joe took part in five open-ended in-depth interviews over a 14-month period to investigate his experiences as an elite athlete within an Australian football team. Joe's story was analysed through an acculturation-process lens and models on mental toughness, overtraining, and stress-recovery to evaluate the indoctrination of one athlete.

    Findings: During the initial interviews Joe resisted the subculture demands of the football club and tried to find success by maintaining his own beliefs. By the end of the 14-month study Joe had realised that to be successful in the club he needed to embrace the norms, traditions, ideals, and imperatives of the football culture. Joe gained acceptance at the club when he eventually internalised the hypermasculine subculture and ignored injury, played in pain, subjugated his interests for football, and viewed physical abuse as a positive and necessary part of the toughening process.

    Conclusion: Joe's case study demonstrates that the subcultural ideals of mental toughness mean ignoring injury, playing in pain, denying emotion and vulnerability, and sacrificing individuality, which inevitably lead to stress/recovery imbalance and overtraining. In this subculture, demonstrating mental toughness is similar to a hypermasculine environment typified by slogans such as no-pain-no-gain and rest-is-for-the-dead where success is more important than individual wellbeing. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 40.
    Tibbert, Stephanie J.
    et al.
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia; AECC University College, Bournemouth, England.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australien.
    Morris, Tony
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Mesagno, Christopher
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Australian Football Coaches' Tales of Mental Toughness: Exploring the Sociocultural Roots2023In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored how three professional Australian football coaches learned and understood mental toughness. Participants shared stories regarding mental toughness through semistructured interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis was used to interpret the data. Creative nonfiction was employed to develop a composite story. All participants' voices contributed equally to the narrative, which follows Sam (our composite coach) through three periods in his career: as a junior player, an elite footballer, and, finally, a coach in the professional football environment. Mental toughness was fundamentally determined by the sociocultural environment in which one was immersed. Athletes and coaches were expected to internalize dominant understandings of mental toughness and reinforce ideals and were punished if they deviated from mentally tough standards set up in their clubs. Mental toughness was defined by various values, beliefs, and norms that originated from the sociocultural environment, indicating the importance of context in understanding the roots of being mentally tough. © 2023 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 41.
    Tod, David
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, England.
    McEwan, Mark B.
    University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    When to Refer Athletes to Other Helping Professionals2021In: Applied Sport Psychology: Personal Growth to Peak Performance / [ed] Jean M. Williams & Vikki Krane, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2021, 8, p. 433-450Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Van Raalte, Judy L.
    et al.
    Springfield College, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Petitpas, Albert J.
    Springfield College, Springfield, MA, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Rizzo, Julia
    Springfield College, Springfield, MA, USA.
    Using Technology in Supervision and Training2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied, Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Appraoch / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 352-359Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    et al.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, North Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    One shot at a time: A mindfulness-based case study in golf2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 247-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Zizzi, Sam J.
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Zizzi, Sam J.
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. The Institute for Social Neuroscience, Melbourne, Australia.
    Minkler, Thomas O.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    An Eastern philosophical approach2024In: Routledge handbook of applied sport psychology: a comprehensive guide for students and practitioners / [ed] David Todd; Ken Hodge; Vikki Krane, Abingdon: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 231-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 45 of 45
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