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  • 1.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Autism, new media and the transformation of "the social"2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with Asperger Syndrome and high function autism generally suffers from impaired social skills and a strong need for a private space for oneself. In diagnostic classifications of mental illnesses social awkwardness and a strong desire for solitude are viewed as symptoms of mental disorder and as deviances from an imagined normality.

    Based on interviews with autistic people and analysis of social interaction between them on a social media platform the aim of this paper is to investigate how new social media transform their situation in various ways. New social media, with its culture of connectivity, reshape how they relate to others and themselves and transform vulnerabilities that are always at play in encounters between human beings. At play are also changing borders between the public and the private as well as the questioning of communicative ideals based on face-to-face encounters.

    More specifically we focus on how new social media transforms: 1) vulnerabilities between people in social interaction as well as the “interaction order” that regulates this interaction; 2) what it means to be a social being – and consequently to be involuntary lonely or seeking solitude. 

  • 2.
    Luthra, Renee
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    After upper secondary school: Young adults with intellectual disability not involved in employment, education or daily activity in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited knowledge about young persons with intellectual disability who are Not in Employment, Education or Daily activity (NEED) in Sweden. The aim of the study was to explore the post-upper secondary school situation for persons with intellectual disability not involved in traditional occupations. A national database containing 2955 persons, representing 24.1% of the total (N=12,269) was used. The results revealed a heterogeneous group where financial support was common and few made use of disability services. Gender, municipality, programme type, financial support and disability services were significantly associated with not having an occupation as opposed to being in employment, education or daily activity. Time was a central factor, as the early years after upper secondary school appear to be an important period for changing NEED status. This is the first large scale study to describe these persons not involved in traditional occupations in Sweden and further research is required.

  • 3.
    Luthra, Renee
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). La Trobe University, School of Allied Health, Living with Disability Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    ‘Just Because One has Attended a Special Class Does Not Mean that One Isn’t Capable’: The Experiences of Becoming and Being Not Involved in Traditional Occupations for Young People with Intellectual Disability2018In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young adults with intellectual disability face challenges in securing post-secondary school occupations. This can result in being Not in Employment, Education, or Daily activity (NEED). This qualitative interview study analyzes the subjective experiences of the process to becoming and being NEED. The analysis focuses on individual as well as structural factors, and how these are experienced in different arenas in society and in interactions with agencies. Interviews with 10 participants followed by thematic analysis were conducted. The results indicate that the process from secondary school to being outside of traditional occupations is not linear. Individual factors such as desires, abilities, and health problems, combined with structural factors of limited or unsuitable post-school occupations and challenges with formal support contribute to understanding people with intellectual disability who are NEED. The experiences of being NEED relate to social exclusion underlined with notions of normality and stigmatization of having an intellectual disability.

  • 4.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    User-participation in Coproduction of Health Innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This project concerns advancing knowledge, methods and logics for user-participation in coproduction of health innovations. Such advancement is vital for several reasons. From a user perspective, participation in coproduction provides an opportunity to gain real influence over goal definition, design and implementation of health innovations, ensuring that the solution developed solves real problems in right ways. From a societal perspective, it’s amean to improve the efficiency of healthcare and the implementation of the Patient Act. As for industry, frameworks and knowledge of coproduction offers tools to operate in a complex sector, with great potential for innovation of services and products.

    Objectives: The fundamental objective of this project is to advance knowledge and methods of how user- participation in the coproduction of health innovations can be applied in order to benefit users, industry and public sector.

    Method: This project is a synergy project, which means that the objective will be accomplished through collaboration and meta-analysis between three sub-projects that address different user groups, apply different strategies to promote human health and relate to different parts of the health sector. The work on the work packages will use case methodology for data collection and analysis based on the subprojects as data sources. More concretely, a logic of a multiple case studies will be applied with each subproject representing a separate case which is similar to each other in its attention to user-participation in coproduction, but different regarding e.g. context and target groups. At the synergy level the framework methodology will be used to handle and analyse the vast amount of information generated within the subprojects.

    Results and conclusions: By addressing the objective of this project, we will create new knowledge on how to manage challenges to health innovation associated with the coproduction process, the positioning of solutions and realisation.

  • 5.
    Nygren, Jens Martin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    User Participation in Coproduction of Health Innovation: Proposal for a Synergy Project2018In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This project concerns advancing knowledge, methods, and logic for user participation in coproduction of health innovations. Such advancement is vital for several reasons. From a user perspective, participation in coproduction provides an opportunity to gain real influence over goal definition, design, and implementation of health innovations, ensuring that the solution developed solves real problems in right ways. From a societal perspective, it's a mean to improve the efficiency of health care and the implementation of the Patient Act. As for industry, frameworks and knowledge of coproduction offer tools to operate in a complex sector, with great potential for innovation of services and products.

    Objective: The fundamental objective of this project is to advance knowledge and methods of how user participation in the coproduction of health innovations can be applied in order to benefit users, industry, and public sector.

    Methods: This project is a synergy project, which means that the objective will be accomplished through collaboration and meta-analysis between three subprojects that address different user groups, apply different strategies to promote human health, and relate to different parts of the health sector. Furthermore, subprojects focus on distinctive stages in the spectrum of innovation, with the objective to generate knowledge of the innovation process as a whole. The project is organized around three work packages related to three challenges-coproduction, positioning, and realization. Each subproject is designed such that it has its own field of study with clearly identified objectives but also targets work packages to contribute to the project as a whole. The work on the work packages will use case methodology for data collection and analysis based on the subprojects as data sources. More concretely, logic of multiple case studies will be applied with each subproject representing a separate case which is similar to each other in its attention to user participation in coproduction, but different regarding, for example, context and target groups. At the synergy level, the framework methodology will be used to handle and analyze the vast amount of information generated within the subprojects.

    Results: The project period is from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2022.

    Conclusions: By addressing the objective of this project, we will create new knowledge on how to manage challenges to health innovation associated with the coproduction process, the positioning of solutions, and realization. © Jens Nygren, Elena Zukauskaite, Niklas Westberg.

  • 6.
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Individ och kollektiv i ett diagnostiskt landskap i förändring2017In: Den motspänstiga akademikern: Festskrift till Ingrid Sahlin / [ed] Björn Andersson, Frida Petersson & Anette Skårner, Malmö: Égalité , 2017, p. 487-512Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Meddelanden från enskildheten: En sociologisk studie av ensamhet och avskildhet2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explorea and analyse how loneliness and solitude are constructed as problems and how they are explained by ”society” in different forms of texts and by people who themselves define their situations as characterized by loneliness or solitude. The latter forms a special focus and my ambition is to understand how they answer to a social situation that in different ways problematize them as persons and construct their life situation as an anomaly. Even if the situation is characterized by loneliness or a search for social distance the task of explaining the situation is not taking place in a social or cultural vacuum; as the situation is viewed as an anomaly society creates it’s own interpretations and discourses which influences individuals and groups understanding. Therefore two different kinds of empirical material have been used. First, texts from research and science concerning loneliness and solitude as well as representations from other textual genres. Second, texts written by self defined lonely people and persons who expressly seek solitude and these are collected from two ”places” on Internet. From a dating service specialised in lonely people and a community of people who strives towards solitude as a way of life. The main unit of analysis consits of the language in these texts and are interpretated  by an textual analysis influenced by discource analysis. A major problem regarding loneliness and solitude is ”the social”. Even if solitude are about social inattention, discourses are often occupied by social life in different manifestations; mostly in form of a social dissatisfaction that motivates freedom from society and community. In loneliness discourses lack of social connection, naturally, represents a central theme. Because solitude is understood as motivated by the individual and loneliness as caused by forces that the individual usually doesn’t control, the individual in discourses of solitude appears as one of pride and agency while the individual in loneliness discourses appears as a shameful victim. Solitude and loneliness are deviances which are managed with help of explanatory ”accounts”: 1) Excuses in form of ”scapegoats” where other peoples deficiencies is singled out as cause or motive to both loneliness and solitude. 2) Excuses with reference to illness and psychological problems, which to a large extent explains loneliness. 3) Justifications of solitude with reference to freedom to self-realization and communion. Based on my analysis a composed situation appears wherein lonely people and people seeking a private space seems to have a lot in common: social dissatisfaction and alienation, designation of scapegoats, a longing for authenticity etc. It is even possible that they, to a degree, share a life-situation characterized by alienation and despair but ”choses” different vocabularies or discourses for rendering the situation as intelligible, which makes a shared situation into different ones.

  • 8.
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sick in a New Way?: From Asperger Syndrome to Autism Spectrum Disorder2017In: 13th Conference of the European Sociological Association. (Un)Making Europe: Capitalism, Solidarities, Subjectivities: Programme Book, European Sociological Association , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “We Aspies has found our identity in our diagnosis and now it’s taken away” one could read in a Swedish newspaper in 2011. This was a response to the decision to eliminate Asperger Syndrome (AS) from the leading diagnostic classifications of mental illnesses and let the condition be included in the category of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). For people with AS this alteration in diagnostic classification had a strong impact on their everyday life, as subjectivities, solidarities within the aspies-community and relations to various agencies and collectives are now subjects for renegotiating.

    Grounded in an on-going study, involving interviews with 20 people with AS and analysis of an online community, the paper will focus on three questions: What symptoms, problems and sufferings are AS used to decipher in everyday life and how can these experiences be analysed from a sociological point of view? How does AS as a cultural category, embedded in psychiatric discourse, structure the feelings and explanations of mental suffering and what happens with this interpretative practice when the diagnosis is incorporated in ASD? In what ways does this change transform the conditions for AS as a resource for subjectivity, collectivisation of suffering, and management of feelings of social deviance?

    A goal with the research is also to contribute to the field of “sociology of diagnosis” in relation to an understanding of how psychiatry increasingly makes social interaction a subject for medicalization of human behaviour.

    © European Sociological Association, 2017

     

  • 9.
    Westberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Andersson, Björn
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Det urbana spöket: "A-laget" i det offentliga rummet2016In: Social exkludering: Perspektiv, process, problemkonstruktion / [ed] Frida Petersson & Tobias Davidsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2016, p. 163-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
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