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  • 1.
    Lawton Smith, Helen
    et al.
    Department of Management, Birkbeck, University of London, London,UK & Oxfordshire Economic Observatory, Oxford University, Oxford, UK.
    Trippl, Michaela
    Department of Geography and Regional Research, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Waters, Rupert
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Policies for New Path Development: The Case of Oxfordshire2018In: New Avenues for Regional Innovation Systems: Theoretical Advances, Empirical Cases and Policy Lessons / [ed] Arne Isaksen, Roman Martin & Michaela Trippl, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 295-314Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reflects on how evolutionary economic geography (EEG) can be extended to incorporate public policy in its explanations of path development. A weakness of EEG is the poor conceptualisation of the role of the state (central, regional, local) in regional path development. It is therefore argued that a multi-scalar perspective of policy is required and that a large set of policies deserve attention. Oxfordshire in the UK is used to explore the link between public policy and path development. © Springer International Publishing AG 2018. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Liu, Ju
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Regional institutions and organizations and the interrelatedness with global knowledge exchange. The new media industry in Scandinavia and China.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Miörner, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trippl, Michaela
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Creating institutional preconditions for knowledge flows in cross-border regions2018In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 201-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, we have witnessed an intensive scholarly discussion about the limitations of traditional inward looking regional innovation strategies. New policy approaches put more emphasis on promoting the external connectedness of regions. However, the institutional preconditions for collaboration across borders have received little attention so far. The aim of this paper is to investigate both conceptually and empirically how policy network organizations can target the institutional underpinnings and challenges of cross-border integration processes and knowledge flows. The empirical part of the paper consists of an analysis of activities performed by four cross-border policy network organizations in the Öresund region (made up of Zealand in Denmark and Scania in Sweden) and how they relate to the creation of institutional preconditions and the removal of institutional barriers. Our findings suggest that cross-border policy network organizations have limited power to change or facilitate the adaptation of formal institutions directly. They mainly rely on mobilizing actors at other territorial levels for improving the formal institutional conditions for knowledge flows. Informal institutions, on the other hand, can be targeted by an array of different tools available to policy network organizations. We conclude that institutional preconditions in cross-border regions are influenced by collective activities of multiple actors on different territorial levels, and that regional actors mainly adapt to the existing institutional framework rather than change it. For innovation policy, this implies that possibilities for institutional change and adaptation need to be considered in regional innovation policy strategies. © 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

  • 4.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    User-participation in Coproduction of Health Innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This project concerns advancing knowledge, methods and logics for user-participation in coproduction of health innovations. Such advancement is vital for several reasons. From a user perspective, participation in coproduction provides an opportunity to gain real influence over goal definition, design and implementation of health innovations, ensuring that the solution developed solves real problems in right ways. From a societal perspective, it’s amean to improve the efficiency of healthcare and the implementation of the Patient Act. As for industry, frameworks and knowledge of coproduction offers tools to operate in a complex sector, with great potential for innovation of services and products.

    Objectives: The fundamental objective of this project is to advance knowledge and methods of how user- participation in the coproduction of health innovations can be applied in order to benefit users, industry and public sector.

    Method: This project is a synergy project, which means that the objective will be accomplished through collaboration and meta-analysis between three sub-projects that address different user groups, apply different strategies to promote human health and relate to different parts of the health sector. The work on the work packages will use case methodology for data collection and analysis based on the subprojects as data sources. More concretely, a logic of a multiple case studies will be applied with each subproject representing a separate case which is similar to each other in its attention to user-participation in coproduction, but different regarding e.g. context and target groups. At the synergy level the framework methodology will be used to handle and analyse the vast amount of information generated within the subprojects.

    Results and conclusions: By addressing the objective of this project, we will create new knowledge on how to manage challenges to health innovation associated with the coproduction process, the positioning of solutions and realisation.

  • 5.
    Nygren, Jens Martin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westberg, Niklas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    User Participation in Coproduction of Health Innovation: Proposal for a Synergy Project2018In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This project concerns advancing knowledge, methods, and logic for user participation in coproduction of health innovations. Such advancement is vital for several reasons. From a user perspective, participation in coproduction provides an opportunity to gain real influence over goal definition, design, and implementation of health innovations, ensuring that the solution developed solves real problems in right ways. From a societal perspective, it's a mean to improve the efficiency of health care and the implementation of the Patient Act. As for industry, frameworks and knowledge of coproduction offer tools to operate in a complex sector, with great potential for innovation of services and products.

    Objective: The fundamental objective of this project is to advance knowledge and methods of how user participation in the coproduction of health innovations can be applied in order to benefit users, industry, and public sector.

    Methods: This project is a synergy project, which means that the objective will be accomplished through collaboration and meta-analysis between three subprojects that address different user groups, apply different strategies to promote human health, and relate to different parts of the health sector. Furthermore, subprojects focus on distinctive stages in the spectrum of innovation, with the objective to generate knowledge of the innovation process as a whole. The project is organized around three work packages related to three challenges-coproduction, positioning, and realization. Each subproject is designed such that it has its own field of study with clearly identified objectives but also targets work packages to contribute to the project as a whole. The work on the work packages will use case methodology for data collection and analysis based on the subprojects as data sources. More concretely, logic of multiple case studies will be applied with each subproject representing a separate case which is similar to each other in its attention to user participation in coproduction, but different regarding, for example, context and target groups. At the synergy level, the framework methodology will be used to handle and analyze the vast amount of information generated within the subprojects.

    Results: The project period is from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2022.

    Conclusions: By addressing the objective of this project, we will create new knowledge on how to manage challenges to health innovation associated with the coproduction process, the positioning of solutions, and realization. © Jens Nygren, Elena Zukauskaite, Niklas Westberg.

  • 6.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Variety of Regional Innovation Systems and Their Institutional Characteristics2018In: New Avenues for Regional Innovation Systems: Theoretical Advances, Empirical Cases and Policy Lessons / [ed] Arne Isaksen, Roman Martin & Michaela Trippl, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 41-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional Innovation Systems (RISs) come in many shapes. Current RIS typologies, however, pay insufficient attention to institutional factors and as a consequence they fall short of capturing an essential source of variety of RISs in a systematic way. This chapter contributes to a further conceptual development of the RIS approach by capturing regional variety not only in terms of actors and networks but also in terms of institutions. It is shown that an institutional perspective can enrich existing RIS typologies by providing insights into the distinctive institutional frameworks of different RIS types and their particular institutional bottlenecks. Three main causes of institutional bottlenecks are identified, that is, lack of or poorly developed institutions, inappropriate institutions, and contradicting/poorly aligned institutions. As shown in this chapter the institutional perspective advocated here holds a strong potential to contribute to a further conceptual development of the RIS approach. © Springer International Publishing AG 2018. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trippl, Michaela
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Plechero, Monica
    University of Venice, Venice, Italy.
    Institutional Thickness Revisited2017In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 325-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, the notion of institutional thickness has become a key reference for a large body of work that has sought to provide profound insights into the link between institutions and regional development. However, only few attempts have been made to reassess the concept, to improve its methodology, and to reflect on its empirical application. The aim of this article is to revise the original concept of institutional thickness. We draw on and seek to contribute to current work in economic geography and related disciplines on the role of organizations and institutions in regional development. We identify some crucial limitations and provide suggestions for how they can be addressed. It is argued that much can be gained by (1) explicitly elaborating on the relation between the organizational and institutional dimensions of thickness, (2) moving beyond overly static views on thickness, (3) developing a multiscalar approach to thickness, and (4) identifying features for assessing thickness in absolute and relative terms. © 2017 Clark University.

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