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  • 1.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Eriksson, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Meaning of the Lived Experience of Lifestyle Changes for People with Severe Mental Illness2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the lived experience of lifestyle changes as perceived by people with severe mental illness (SMI). People with SMI who have experience in managing lifestyle changes were interviewed (n = 10). The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. The findings reveal three themes: (1) struggling with inner and outer limitations, (2) on one's own but together with others and (3) longing for living a life in harmony. The meaning of lifestyle changes can be understood as a person's internal and external endeavors to make well-considered decisions about lifestyle changes. Support should focus on strengthening the person's self-efficacy and should be based on the person's experiences. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 2.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence2019In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) experience an increased risk of physical ill health and premature death, which appears to be partly related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of health-related lifestyle habits and perceived health among people with severe mental illness. A further aim was to explore if there were any gender differences or differences based on degree of sense of coherence. The study adopted a cross-sectional design based on data from 65 people with SMI. The results show that degree of Sense of Coherence (SOC) does have relevance for perceived health and for dimensions of Quality of Life (QOL). Furthermore, among the participants with strong SOC, there were less daily smokers and they seemed to have less sedentary leisure time than those with low SOC. Men reported more anxiety/depression than women and women ate fruit more often than men, otherwise there were no gender differences. In comparison with the general population, people with SMI show a higher Body Mass Index are more sedentary, more often daily smokers, have lower SOC and perceive a lower QOL. This emphasizes the importance of health-promotion support that focuses on lifestyle changes, and support for strengthening SOC and QOL for people with SMI. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  • 3.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mental health nurses’ experience of physical health care and health promotion initiatives for people with severe mental illness2019In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care for people with severe mental illness is often divided into physical health care and mental health care despite the importance of a holistic approach to caring for the whole person. Mental health nurses have an important role not only in preventing ill health, but also in promoting health, to improve the overall health among people with severe mental illness and to develop a more person-centred, integrated physical and mental health care. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe mental health nurses’ experiences of facilitating aspects that promote physical health and support a healthy lifestyle for people with severe mental illness. Interviews were conducted with mental health nurses (n = 15), and a qualitative content analysis was used to capture the nurse’s experiences. Analysis of the interviews generated three categories: (i) to have a health promotion focus in every encounter, (ii) to support with each person’s unique prerequisites in mind and (iii) to take responsibility for health promotion in every level of the organization. The results show the importance of a health promotion focus that permeates the entire organization of mental health care. Shared responsibility for health and health promotion activities should exist at all levels: in the person-centred care in the relation with the patient, embedded in a joint vision within the working unit, and in decisions at management level. © 2019 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

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