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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Experiences of data collection issues in qualitative studies involving people diagnosed with schizophrenia2016In: Abstracts: Narrative Nursing: Nordic Conference Of Mental Health Nursing: 14-16 September 2016, 2016, p. 41-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The viewpoint and special needs of individuals with severe mental illness are crucial for the development of mental health nursing. In-depth knowledge of the perspectives of people with schizophrenia is primarily established in dialogue with individuals with experience of the phenomenon investigated. Attaining trustworthiness in the findings in qualitative studies is of great importance and the interview approach used should assure trustworthiness in the data collection at different levels with regard to the perspectives of the individual, which is essential for developing nursing research and practice.

    Aim: The aim of the paper was to describe and discuss the issues related to data collection in qualitative studies involving people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Method: Six qualitative interview studies regarding experiences of different aspects of life among people diagnosed with schizophrenia were reflected on and discussed in terms of issues related to data collection involving people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia (N=75).

    Results: The discussions that generated the results revealed three topics in qualitative studies involving individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia: 1) Selection of research context with respect to participants’ different aspects of life, 2) Sampling issues with regard to judgements of participants’ ability to contribute with information and 3) Choice of data collection methods to meet the aim of the enquiry.

    Conclusion: Three crucial areas in data collection in qualitative studies with individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia were revealed. Further studies regarding sampling procedures and analysis of collected data are needed to ensure trustworthiness of findings regarding interviews involving people with severe mental illness.

  • 2.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    How to facilitate healthy living described by persons with persistent psychiatric disorders in psychiatric out-patient settings – challenging health care professionals2016In: Abstracts: Narrative Nursing: Nordic Conference Of Mental Health Nursing: 14-16 September 2016, 2016, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the previous decades, scientific research has demonstrated that people with persistent mental illness like schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders have a reduced life expectancy and have a higher risk of being affected of preventable physical illnesses such as developing metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Additionally it have made evident for lower quality of life as well. These risk factors make health promoting essential in the care providing and therefore it ́s important for the health professionals to have a deeper knowledge about the facilitating factors to healthy living described by persons themselves.

    Aim: The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of persons affected by persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders what facilitates healthy living in their everyday life. The presentation has the focus on the facilitative factors applying health professionals when providing care for persons in psychiatric out-patient settings.

    Method: The study was carried out in three different psychiatric out-patient settings in the southern Sweden. The data was collected through qualitative interviews (N= 16) and analyses by qualitative, inductive approach abased on Granheim and Lundmans ́ conceptualization of content analysis.

    Results: First, it is essential for persons with persistent and severe mental illness that they get support to bring out their needs to healthier living by having a dialogue about the issues of healthy living in their everyday life. In this dialog they may also need support to reflect and find out their own motivating factors to healthier living. Additionally, in this dialogue it is important to be aware of that they will be regarded as a whole person and include many areas of life like daily structure and social life. The professionals should show a truly involvement and active interest to persons when increasing healthy living.

    Conclusion: Many persons with persistent mental illness need practical support in their everyday life to maintaining healthier living. This requires the close cooperation between psychiatric out-patient settings, the housing support professionals from municipalities and the social services.

  • 3.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health Effects of an Individualized Lifestyle Intervention for People with Psychotic Disorders in Psychiatric Outpatient Services: A Two Year Follow-Up2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 839-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with psychotic disorders experience to a great extent avoidable physical illnesses and early mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential effects for this group of participating in a lifestyle intervention. A multi-component nurse-led lifestyle intervention using quasi-experimental design was performed. Changes in biomedical and clinical measurements, self-reported health, symptoms of illness and health behavior were investigated. Multilevel modeling was used to statistically test differences in changes over time. Statistically significant changes were found in physical activity, HbA1c and waist circumference. A lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental illness can be beneficial for increasing physical activity. © 2019 Blomqvist et al. Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 4.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Center for Collaborative Palliative Care , Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 5.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  • 6.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Att söka förlossningsvård i tidigt förlossningsskede2008In: Forskningskonferens: Konferens med fokus på forskning inom omvårdnad/vård, folkhälsovetenskap, handikapp, socialt arbete och idrottspsykologi, 2008, p. 16-16Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Att träda in i förlossningen: kvinnors tillit till sin egen förmåga att hantera förlossningen och deras upplevelse av det tidiga förlossningsarbetet2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of the early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30230Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place.

    Methods: The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts.

    Conclusion: The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth.

  • 9.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Dagen då allt rasade samman: att bli anmäld som vårdpersonal2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Delaktighet för barn och unga i hälso- och sjukvård: En realitet eller ett omöjligt uppdrag2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Födandets rum: förlossningsrummet2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, pregnant women are encouraged to remain at home until the active phase of labour. This recommendation is based on evidence, that women who seek care and are admitted in the latent phase of labour are subjected to more obstetric interventions and suffer more complications, than women who remain at home until the active phase of labour. The objective of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset until admission to delivery ward.

    Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with nineteen women after they had given birth to their first child.

    A constructivist grounded theory method was used.

    Findings:Maintaining power” was identified as the core category, explaining the women’s experience of having enough power to deal with the situation, when labour started. Four related categories; “to share the experience with another”, “to listen to the rhythm of the body”, “to distract oneself” and” to be encased in a glass vessel”, explained how the women coped and thereby maintained power.

    Conclusions: The women in this study had a sense of power that was expressed as a driving

    force towards the birth, a bodily and mental strength linked to the conviction that they had the right to decide over their own bodies. This implies that women have the ability to make choices during the birth process that enable them to maintain their power.  The professionals need to be sensitive, supportive and respectful of women’s own preferences in the health care encounter, to promote the existing power throughout the birthing process.

  • 12.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Förlossningens latensfas2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Maintaining power; an asset during early labour process2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Platsen och rummets betydelse i tidigt förlossningarbete2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    The movement towards birth: A study of women's childbirth self-efficacy and early labour2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase the understanding of early labour, the latency phase of labour, based on women’s experiences and ability to handle the situation. Furthermore, the aim was to perform a psychometric testing of an instrument measuring childbirth self-efficacy and to explore the relationships to women´s well-being and number of obstetric interventions and birth outcomes.

    Methods: In study I, a grounded theory method was used to obtain a deeper understanding of how women who seek care at an early stage experience the latent phase of labour. The same method, grounded theory was used in study II, but in this study, the aim was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset before admission to maternity ward. In both these studies (I & II) interviews were used to collect data. Study III and IV were cross sectional studies with a  consecutive data collection. In study III, a forward-backward translation was used to translate the childbirth self-efficacy inventory (CBSEI) into a Swedish version. An explorative factor analysis with principal component analysis was used to test the psychometric properties of the inventory and reliability tests with Cronbach's alpha and inter item total correlation was performed. In study IV, chi-2 test, Fisher's exact test and student's t-test for independent samples was performed between women´s estimated childbirth self-efficacy and demographics, obstetric interventions and birth outcomes. Correlations were also performed between different scales measuring well-being during pregnancy and childbirth self-efficacy. Finally a logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the probability for low or high childbirth self-efficacy.

    Findings: Being in a safe place is essential for the women in the early labour process. But a safe place has different meanings for different women, depending on how they assess their own ability to handle their impending labour. For some women, the hospital is a secure place, a place where somebody else can take over the responsibility for themselves, the labour process or their child’s well-being. Some women choose to remain in their homes, which they consider as a kind of base camp which they can leave and go back to whenever they please. There is also a difference in how women ascribe ability to their own bodies and women´s belief in their own ability to cope and deal with the impending birth, their self-efficacy. These differences together with the women´s choice of seeking care or not, during the early labour process, affect the women´s experience of the labour process. The women's experience during the early labour process varies from feeling powerful and strong, to perceiving themselves as victims and feeling totally powerless. Women with high self-efficacy as measured by CBSEI had less previous mental illness and had more often been told their sister´s birth story. During the labour process, women with a higher childbirth self-efficacy have a lower frequency of epidural analgesia than women with low childbirth self-efficacy.

    Conclusion: Women´s belief in their childbirth self-efficacy affects their choice of place to be, during the early labour process. The place in turn, affects the women´s experiences and the way they handle the early labour process. The early labour process is a sensitive period that requires attention and should not be neglected. Through increased knowledge and understanding of the problematic issues related to the early labour process, the birth preparation and antenatal obstetric care, as well as the care during labour can be improved.

  • 16.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Berg, Marie
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reprioritizing life: A conceptual model of how women with type 1 diabetes deal with main concerns in early motherhood2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1394147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Becoming a mother is related to increased demands for women with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and more research is needed to identify their needs for support in everyday living. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the main concerns in daily life in early motherhood for women with type 1 diabetes and how they deal with these concerns. Method: A grounded theory study was conducted in which 14 women with type 1 diabetes were interviewed individually 7 to 17 months after childbirth. Results: A conceptual model was identified with the core category “reprioritizing life”, and three related categories: adjusting to motherhood, taking command of the diabetes, and seeking like-minded women. Becoming a mother was a turning point towards a greater awareness and acceptance of prioritizing diabetes management and health, and thus, life. There was a gap in provision of diabetes care after birth and during the time of early motherhood compared with during pregnancy. Conclusions: Healthcare contacts already planned before delivery can promote person-centred care during the whole period from pregnancy to motherhood. Moreover, providing alternative sources for health information and peer support could improve the life situation during early motherhood. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 17.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ethical and methodological issues in qualitative studies involving people with severe and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions: a critical review2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no Sup. 2, article id 1368323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Undertaking research studies in the field of mental health is essential in mental health nursing. Qualitative research methodologies enable human experiences to become visible and recognize the importance of lived experiences. This paper argues that involving people with schizophrenia in research is critical to promote their health and well-being. The quality of qualitative research needs scrutinizing according to methodological issues such as trustworthiness and ethical standards that are a fundamental part of qualitative research and nursing curricula. The aim of this study was to critically review recent qualitative studies involving people with severe and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions, regarding descriptions of ethical and methodological issues in data collection and analysis. A search for relevant papers was conducted in three electronic databases, in December 2016. Fifteen qualitative interview studies were included and reviewed regarding methodological issues related to ethics, and data collection and analysis. The results revealed insufficient descriptions of methodology regarding ethical considerations and issues related to recruitment and sampling in qualitative interview studies with individuals with severe mental illness, putting trustworthiness at risk despite detailed descriptions of data analysis. Knowledge from the perspective of individuals with their own experience of mental illness is essential. Issues regarding sampling and trustworthiness in qualitative studies involving people with severe mental illness are vital to counteract the stigmatization of mental illness.

  • 18.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Odberg Pettersson, Karen
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Vad gör vi med latensfasen?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Länssjukhuset i Halmstad, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Odberg-Pettersson, Karen
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Kvinnor som söker vård i tidigt förlossningsskede och deras upplevelse av latensfasen2007In: Reproduktiv Hälsa, Stockholm: Svenska Barnmorskeförbundet , 2007, p. 21-21Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    Odberg Pettersson, Karen
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Swedish women's experiences of seeking care and being admitted during the latent phase of labour: A grounded theory study2007In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to gain a deeper understanding of how women who seek care at an early stage experience the latent phase of labour.

    Design: a qualitative interview study using the grounded theory approach.

    Setting: the study was conducted at a hospital in the southwestern part of Sweden with a range of 1600-1700 deliveries per year. The interviews took place in the women's homes two to six weeks after birth.

    Participant: eighteen Swedish women, aged 22-36, who were admitted to the tabour ward while they were stilt in the latent phase of tabour.

    Findings: 'Handing over responsibility' to professional caregivers emerged as the core category or the central theme in the data. The core category and five additional categories formed a conceptual model explaining what it meant to women being admitted in the early stage of tabour and their experiences of the Latent phase of tabour. The categories, which all related to the core category, were labelled: (1) 'longing to complete the pregnancy,' (2) 'having difficulty managing the uncertainty,' (3) 'having difficulty enduring the stow progress,' (4) 'suffering from pain to no avail' and (5) 'oscillating between powerfulness and powerlessness.'

    Conclusions and implications for practice: findings indicate that women being admitted to the tabour ward in the latent phase of tabour experienced a need for handing over responsibility for the tabour, the welt-being of the unborn baby, and for themselves. Midwives have an important role in assisting women with coping during the latent phase of tabour, and in giving the women opportunity to hand over responsibility. This care should include validation of experienced pain and confirmation of the normality of the slow process, information and support. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Place and space in relation to childbirth: a critical interpretive synthesis2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patient participation, a prequisite for care: A grounded theory study of healthcare professionals’ perceptions of what participation means in a paediatric care context2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore healthcare professionals’ perceptions of what patient participation means in a paediatric care context.

    Design

    A qualitative explorative design with grounded theory.

    Methods

    Fifteen healthcare professionals who worked in paediatric care settings were either interviewed or asked open-ended questions in a survey, during December 2015–May 2016. Grounded theory was used as a method.

    Results

    The study results provide a theoretical conceptualization of what patient participation meant for healthcare professionals in paediatric care and how participation was enabled. The core category “participation a prerequisite for care” emerged as the main finding explaining the concept as ethical, practical and integrated in the care givers way of working. However, the concept was implicit in the organization. Four additional categories illustrated the healthcare professionals’ different strategies used to enhance patient participation; “meeting each child where the child is,” “building a relationship with the child,” “showing respect for each individual child” and “making the most of the moment.” © 2017 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 23.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Department of Women's and Children's health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. School of Social and Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    Department of Women's and Children's health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish Child-Birth Self-efficacy Inventory (Swe-CBSEI)2014In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has reported that women who are admitted to delivery wards in early labour process before an active stage of labour has started run an increased risk of instrumental deliveries. Therefore, it is essential to focus on factors such as self-efficacy that can enhance a woman's own ability to cope with the first stage of labour. However, there was no Swedish instrument measuring childbirth self-efficacy available. Thus, the aim of the study was to translate the Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory and to psychometrically test the Swedish version on first- time mothers within the Swedish culture.

    METHODS: The method included a forward-backward translation with face and content validity. The psychometric properties were evaluated using a Principal Component Analysis and by using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and inter-item correlations. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used to describe and compare the scales. All data were collected from January 2011 to June 2012, from 406 pregnant women during the gestational week 35-42.

    RESULTS: The Swedish version of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory indicated good reliability and the Principal Component Analysis showed a three-component structure. The Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test indicated that the women could differentiate between the concepts outcome expectancy and self-efficacy expectatancy and between the two labour stages, active stage and the second stage of labour.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory is a reliable and valid instrument. The inventory can act as a tool to identify those women who need extra support and to evaluate the efforts of improving women's self-efficacy during pregnancy. © 2014 Carlsson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 24.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Halland Hospital Halmstad, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Nissen, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The relationship between childbirth self-efficacy and aspects of well-being, birth interventions and birth outcomes2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: this study aimed to examine how women׳s childbirth self-efficacy beliefs relate to aspects of well-being during the third trimester of pregnancy and whether there was any association between childbirth self-efficacy and obstetric factors.

    DESIGN: a cross-sectional design was used. The data was obtained through the distribution of a composite questionnaire and antenatal and birth records.

    SETTING: data were recruited from antenatal health-care clinics in Halland, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: a consecutive sample of 406 pregnant women was recruited at the end of pregnancy at gestational weeks of 35-42.

    MEASUREMENTS: five different measures were used; the Swedish version of Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory, the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence Questionnaire, the Maternity Social Support Scale and finally the Profile of Mood States.

    FINDINGS: results showed that childbirth self-efficacy was correlated with positive dimensions as vigour, sense of coherence and maternal support and negatively correlated with previous mental illness, negative mood states and fear of childbirth. Women who reported high childbirth self-efficacy had less epidural analgesia during childbirth, compared to women with low self-efficacy.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: this study highlights that childbirth self-efficacy is a positive dimension that interplays with other aspects and contributes to well-being during pregnancy and thereby, acts as an asset in the context of childbirth. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 25.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Hälsoakademin, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maintaining power: Women's experiences from labour onset before admittance to maternity ward2011In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: in Sweden pregnant women are encouraged to remain at home until the active phase of labour. Recommendation is based on evidence, that women who seek care and are admitted in the latent phase of labour are subjected to more obstetric interventions and suffer more complications than women who remain at home until the active phase of labour. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset until admission to labour ward. Method: interviews were conducted with 19 women after they had given birth to their first child. A Constructivist Grounded theory method was used. Findings: 'Maintaining power' was identified as the core category, explaining the women's experience of having enough power, when the labour started. Four related categories: to share the experience with another', to listen to the rhythm of the body', to distract oneself and to be encased in a glass vessel', explained how the women coped and thereby maintained power. Conclusions: the first time mothers in this study, who managed to stay at home during the latent phase of labour, had a sense of power that was expressed as a driving force towards the birth, a bodily and mental strength and the right to decide over their own bodies. This implies that women who maintain power have the ability to make choices during the birth process. The professionals need to be sensitive, supportive and respectful to women's own preferences in the health-care encounter, to promote the existing power throughout the birthing process. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 26.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study was aimed at developing the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players by means of exploring their career experiences in athletic and non-athletic developments through the lens of the holistic athletic career model. Eighteen Swedish professional handball players (nine men and nine women), who had recently terminated or were finishing their careers took part in semi-structured interviews about their careers from the beginning to the end with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially focused on identifying the handball career structure (i.e. stages and sub-stages). Then, the interviews were analysed inductively to identify shared themes in the players’ experiences relevant to each career stage. These themes were incorporated in the relevant stages, and the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players (further – the empirical model) was finalised. The empirical model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four athletic stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation – complemented by players’ psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, and financial developments. Each stage is also aligned with age markers and contains themes describing players’ career experiences from the holistic perspective. The empirical model contributes to contextualised career research and serves as a basis for developing career-long psychological support services in Swedish handball including player/coach/parent education organised by the Swedish Handball Federation.

  • 27.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ryba, Tatania
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Composite vignettes of Swedish male and female professional handball players’ career paths2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe gender-specific career paths of Swedish professional handball players. A reanalysis of Ekengren et al. (2018) career interviews with nine male and nine female players led to creating two composite vignettes using the athletes’ own words, accounted for typical features in the male and female players’ career paths. Seven themes were identified in the analysis of the men’s transcripts and eight themes derived from the women’s transcripts. Further, the themes of both vignettes were aligned with career stages described in our previous study (Ekengren et al. 2018). The male players’ vignette is interpreted as a performance narrative congruent with elite handball culture that promotes performance success and profitable professional contracts. The female players’ vignette is more holistic, embracing handball, studies, motherhood, and how they ought to be as Swedish women. Recommendations for future research are provided. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 28.
    Hansson, Malin
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Midwives marching to own drum in the Baby Factory - other professions perspectives of midwifery work in labour wards2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a paradigm shift in midwifery over time where different professions now work together in childbirth care. There is little research on midwives’ work from other professionals’ perspectives, which is of importance to improve midwives work situation and women-centred care. Therefore, the aim of this article was to explore other professions´ views of midwifery work during childbirth. Classical Grounded Theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth. The substantive theory of ‘veiled midwifery’ emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the ‘baby factory’ context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives´ work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were ‘marching to own drum’. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance. The theory of veiled midwifery could be used as a theoretical basis for future studies, and could be a foundation for a dialogue of philosophical differences in the way birth is viewed in the clinical setting, to improve the work situation.

  • 29.
    Hansson, Malin
    et al.
    Institution of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Institution of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Veiled midwifery in the baby factory: A grounded theory study2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Midwives' professional role has been changing drastically over time, from handling births in home settings to being part of a team in labour wards in hospitals. This demands a greater effort of interprofessional collaboration in childbirth care.

    AIM: Explore midwives' work in a hospital-based labour ward from the perspectives of other professions, working in the same ward.

    METHOD: Classical grounded theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth.

    FINDINGS: The substantive theory of 'veiled midwifery' emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the 'baby factory' context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives' work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were 'marching to own drum'. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide a theoretical conceptualisation of a 'veiled midwifery 'that causes problems for the surrounding team. This generates a desire to streamline and control midwifery in order to increase interprofessional collaboration. © 2018 The Authors

  • 30.
    Hansson, Malin
    et al.
    Institution of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Institution of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Veiled midwifery in the baby factory — A grounded theory study2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Midwives’ professional role has been changing drastically over time, from handling births in home settings to being part of a team in labour wards in hospitals. This demands a greater effort of interprofessional collaboration in childbirth care.

    Aim: Explore midwives’ work in a hospital-based labour ward from the perspectives of other professions, working in the same ward.

    Method: Classical grounded theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth.

    Findings: The substantive theory of ‘veiled midwifery’ emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the ‘baby factory’ context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives’ work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were ‘marching to own drum’. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance.

    Conclusions: Findings provide a theoretical conceptualisation of a ‘veiled midwifery ‘that causes problems for the surrounding team. This generates a desire to streamline and control midwifery in order to increase interprofessional collaboration. © 2018 The Authors.

  • 31.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Equine-Assisted Therapeutic Interventions Among Individuals Diagnosed With Schizophrenia. A Systematic Review2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 647-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons diagnosed with schizophrenia are not sufficiently offered health promotion interventions, notwithstanding their increased risk of bodily ill health. Physical activity is found to improve health and decrease psychiatric symptoms although, there is a challenge to motivate and increase physical activity in people with schizophrenia and innovative evidence-based treatment interventions are needed. The aim was to systematically review studies concerning equine assisted interventions among individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. The findings of the six included articles indicate that therapeutic equine assisted interventions could be beneficial for individuals with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia or schizophrenia like disorders.

  • 32.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyman, Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Children and young people’s participation in developing interventions in health and well-being: a scoping review2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 507Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Greater interest is being shown in participatory approaches, especially in research on interventions that concern children and young people'shealth and well-being. Although participatory approaches have user involvement in common, they differ in terms of the explicit guidance on how to actually involve and engage children and young people in health research. The aim of this scoping review was to systematically map recent research involving children and young people in the development of interventions targeting issues of health and well-being. Methods: An interpretative scoping literature review based on: a scientific literature search in (health and social science) databases, reference lists, a manual search in key journals and contact with existing networks was conducted. A total of 4458 references were identified through the literature search, of which 41 studies published between 2000 and 2017 were included in the review. The target population was children and young people under 25 years old. Level of participation was categorized according to Shier's Pathways to Participation Model. Results: The review showed that participatory approaches were most often used in the development of interventions in school settings and in community and healthcare settings and on issues concerning support in lifestyle or in managing illness or disease. The level of participation varied from children and young people taking part just as active informants, through stages of greater participation both in quantitative and qualitative terms, to children and youngpeople becoming an active agent involved as a co-researcher where the research process was shaped by views of a higher level of mutuality. Most of the studies were categorised at a medium level and only three studies were judged to involve the children and young people at the highest level. Conclusions: This scoping review showed that work remains in enabling children and young people to influence the development of interventions targeting health and well-being. In relation to level of sustainability in the interventions, it is relevant that goals, strategies and processes are formulated by those who can gain from the interventions. Participatory approaches aiming for a higher level of participation where children and young people work together with the researchers in partnerships are thus warranted. © 2018 The Author(s).

  • 33.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Parents’ experiences of an e-health intervention implemented in pediatric healthcare: a qualitative study2019In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, article id 800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The growing field of participation in healthcare has the potential to provide a number of benefits for children, patients, healthcare professionals and also the healthcare systems. According to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), children have the right to participate in their own healthcare and make their voice heard. Children’s opportunities for understanding their conditions, sharing their views and participating in decisions regarding their care depend on healthcare professionals but also on parents’ ability to communicate and include children. E-health solutions can remove barriers to children’s communication with healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ perspectives on the outcomes of an e-health solution, Sisom, used by children during healthcare appointments.

    Methods: The empirical data is based on interviews with 16 parents. In the present study constructivist, grounded theory was chosen as the method.

    Results: The theory of enhancing participation, by orientating communication about healthcare towards the voice of the child instead of the parents, summarizes the process of how the outcome of Sisom for children lead to enhanced participation, by making the child the main actor and an agent in his/her own healthcare. The facilitators for achieving participation in Sisom were four interrelated outcomes; engaging, voice-guarding, raising awareness and integrity preserving. In addition to generating increased participation, it emerged that the use of Sisom also initiated a process, which was evident in all four subcategories that facilitated the child in coping with the experience of having an illness.

    Conclusions: We conclude, that Sisom orientated communication about healthcare towards the voice of the child instead of the parents as well as including the child in the dialogue with the healthcare professional and thus increasing the child’s participation and human rights. © 2019 The Author(s)

  • 34.
    Mirskaya, Maria
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Online reported women’s experiences of symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse after vaginal birth2019In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 19, article id 129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major public health problem with a relative high lifetime risk of surgery. The main risk factor for developing POP is vaginal birth. Many women become symptomatic later in life and most of the existing research on symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (sPOP) predominantly concentrates on the effects of the condition on postmenopausal women. However bothersome symptoms of POP can be reported as early as in women’s 20s and may occur shortly after vaginal birth. Limited studies provide an insight into daily life of fertile women with sPOP. Thus, we aimed to explore fertile women’s experiences of symptomatic pelvic organ (sPOP) after vaginal birth.

    Methods: An inductive, text-driven approach was taken by selecting thread posts from an internet forum written by 33 Swedish fertile women who had experienced sPOP after vaginal birth.

    Results: The overarching theme “being irreparably damaged” was identified as representing an experience of being disabled by sPOP after vaginal birth. The fertile women experienced that their lives were ruined because of physical and psychological limitations caused by this unexpected, unfamiliar and unexplained condition. Living with sPOP impinged on sexual health, restricted daily and sports activities and affected the women’s ability to fulfill everyday parental duties. This in turn compromised women’s psychological health. In addition, the negligence of healthcare professionals who tended to trivialize and normalize the symptoms led to the belief that there were no sustainable treatments and that women would have to live with bothersome symptoms of POP for rest of their lives.

    Conclusions: This study found that sPOP had a significant negative impact on fertile women’s lives. The women indicated that they had not had the opportunity to voice their concerns and had not been taken seriously by healthcare professionals. It is of the utmost importance to acknowledge this problem and develop guidelines for prevention and management of sPOP to improve the quality of life for women. © Mirskaya, Lindgren & Carlsson. 2019

  • 35.
    Mirskaya, Maria
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ruined active life: Experiences of fertile women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse in daily physical active life2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major public health problem. Symptomatic POP (sPOP) affects quality of life and implies an increased risk for surgery. Many women become symptomatic later in life. Existing research on sPOP predominantly concentrates on the effects of the condition on postmenopausal women. However, bothersome symptoms of POP may occur shortly after delivery. This paper provides insight into fertile women's daily physical active lives in order to better understand their situation and improve care for this group.

    Aim: To explore how fertile women with symptomatic POP after vaginal delivery experience their daily physical active life.

    Methods: An inductive, text-driven approach was taken, selecting thread posts from an internet forum written by 33 women. The data presented in this article stem from a larger empirical data that explored fertile women's experiences of symptomatic POP after vaginal delivery (VD). Data were processed using qualitative content analysis. The data consisted of chains of questions and answers or comments on the topic of sPOP, posted on an online forum by fertile women who had experienced sPOP after VD.          

    Results: The theme “Ruined active life” showed that many of the fertile women experienced that their lives were ruined because of unexpected physical limitations caused by sPOP. They found themselves balancing being a parent and being disabled because of sPOP. Bothersome symptoms like vaginal heaviness, fullness, soreness and pain were aggravated by many basic daily activities, generating fear that any action involving physical activity might worsen the situation. The women were extremely scared that doing daily household chores and parenting, e.g. lifting and carrying the baby or using a carrycot, might aggravate the symptoms. Moreover, this fear restricted women from playing active games with their older children, such as helping them onto a swing, teaching them to ride a bike, and jumping on a trampoline. All these restrictions led to feelings of being inadequate mothers, resulting in frustration, sadness, anger, uncertainty and a growing sense of hopelessness.Another substantial result of this study addresses sport activities. For many fertile women, sports activities had played an important role before delivery, and now sPOP restricted them from it. The realisation that they could not continue engaging in sports at the same level of athletic performance as before delivery led to intense grief, anxiety and frustration. For instance, women had to give up running and high-intensity training. Some of them did not dare to participate in any activities at the gym. One of them had to quit her job as a training instructor. Giving up favourite activities that were a part of the women’s identity caused an identity crisis, leading to depression. They often expressed that they “just wanted their life back”, demonstrating an inability to accept the new situation. Discussions concerning exercise and safe workouts were very common in the thread. Women were desperate to find information and sought advice from healthcare providers regarding lifestyle changes and how to adjust physical activity in relation to sPOP. However, it was found to be difficult to access satisfactory, unambiguous information. Instead, information was inconsistent, unclear and difficult to understand. Although some healthcare providers were considered helpful and kind, unfortunately they lacked knowledge, which led to useless advice being given which often was not in line with the information that the women had found out by themselves from independent sources. For instance, one woman was encouraged to continue with life as usual and with exercises such as doing sit-ups in spite of her complaints about aggravating her symptoms by physical activity. The woman was told that “nothing would fall out” and in any case if it did happen she was in no danger. Moreover, the fertile women who sought professional help expressed that normalisation of sPOP as a condition was common among healthcare providers. On the contrary, women did not perceive the symptoms of POP as normal or natural, and the attitude of healthcare professionals was experienced as humiliating and discouraging and caused feelings of not being taken seriously. This led to mistrust, disappointment, frustration and criticism of healthcare professionals and the system.

    Discussion: The fertile women in this study experienced failure to carry out their parental responsibilities, both physically and emotionally. Fear that activities such as lifting children or playing active games with them might worsen the symptoms led to emotional imbalance. This worry has reasonable grounds, owing to an assumption that increased load to the pelvic floor in the form of elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) contributes to development of POP. It has also been shown that IAP increases during brisk walking and as a result of carrying things in a front carry position, which is used by postpartum women to carry their babies in car seats (1).

    One of the main findings of this study was psychological suffering due to an inability to participate in high-intensity exercise, since for some women, exercise was a part of self-esteem and a natural part of life. It is well established that physical activity has positive effects on health. Moreover, moderate or vigorous physical activity such as brisk walking, cycling, tennis, swimming and running has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms postpartum (2). Some of the fertile women in this study suffered from anxiety and depression and would probably have benefited from participating in physical activity. However, they felt unsure about what kind of physical activities they could resume without worsening their symptoms and became disappointed when they faced a lack of understanding and competence among healthcare professionals in terms of advising suitable exercises. Likely recommendations regarding leisure-time physical activity for postpartum women with depression without sPOP must differ from those with sPOP. One such physical activity that has been found to be suitable for women with sPOP is basic Pilates exercises, which does not raise IAP and, for instance, is safe to recommend for women after POP surgery (3).

    Conclusion and clinical implications: This study demonstrates that sPOP has a significant impact on fertile women’s active life. sPOP restricts daily and sports activities and affects the ability to fulfil everyday parental duties. In addition, the lack of information from healthcare providers regarding suitable physical activities adds more emotional stress and worsens the situation. It is of the utmost importance to acknowledge this problem. There is a need to develop guidelines for management of sPOP after VD, including information regarding safe lifting techniques and suitable exercises. Copyright © ICS 2019.

  • 36.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Working for the Child's Best by Creating a Sheltered Place During Chemotherapy for Paediatric Leukaemia2017In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 64, p. S400-S400Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Participation in pediatric day surgery, what it means for children and parents2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 1, p. 407-408Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Importance of Place During Sedation for Intrathecal Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Care2019In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 66, no S4, p. S446-S446Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: Children who are treated for childhood cancer are exposed to hospitalization, interaction with unfamiliar people in strange environments, and unpleasant, and sometimes, procedures. Having to wait for procedures is one of the worst situations, experienced by child patients. It is therefore important that hospitals provide environments that are non-stressful and safe for children in conjunction with procedures. Especially important, is the possibility for children who are hospitalized to sustain everyday activities, such as play, irrespective of their age and severity of illness.

    Objective: To assess differences in expenditure of time and dose of anesthetic drugs during sedation for intrathecal chemotherapy in two different environments- the children's ward, where the child was hospitalized, and the operation theatre.

    Design/Methods: The study is based on retrospective data from repeated treatment sessions recorded in operation planning programs and journals during 2011-2018 (n=164). Children of the ages 1-12 years (n=22) with varying number of treatments were included in the study. Data was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc analyses included the Mann-Whitney Test with Bonferroni correction.

    Results: The time from the start of the procedure until the start of sedation was significantly lower at the children's ward, which was also the case if including the waiting time before the start of the procedure. No significant differences could be found regarding the dose of anesthetic drugs used.

    Conclusions: Sedation for intrathecal chemotherapy at the children's ward provides care to a higher extent in accordance with the needs of the child, by reducing the time for the procedure and thus the interference with the child’s everyday life at the hospital. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 39.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden & Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Participation in pediatric perioperative care: "what it means for parents"2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4246-4254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore what it means for parents to participate in their children's paediatric perioperative care.

    Background: Allowing parents to participate in paediatric perioperative care can make a major difference for children in terms of their well-being, a decreased need for painkillers, fewer sleeping disorders and a more positive experience for both parties. The nurse anaesthetist should have a holistic view and develop a shared vision for the child, the parents and for themselves to perform successful paediatric perioperative care.

    Design: Descriptive qualitative study.

    Methods: The study was conducted in 2014. Data were collected in 20 narrative interviews with 15 mothers and five fathers who had experience of participating in their child's paediatric perioperative day surgery. The analysis was carried out with qualitative content analysis to describe the variations, differences and similarities in the experiences.

    Results: The analysis revealed a main category that describes that parental participation in the context of paediatric perioperative care in day surgery meant 'having strength to participate despite an increased vulnerability'. Three generic categories with additional subcategories explained what was essential for the parents to be able to preserve this strength and participate in their child's care despite their increased vulnerability. The generic categories were named, 'gaining information about what will happen', 'being seen as a resource' and 'gaining access to the environment'.

    Conclusion: Efforts should be made to improve parents' roles and opportunities to participate in paediatric perioperative care.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Nurse anaesthetists have a crucial role in enabling parents' participation and need knowledge to develop strategies and nursing interventions that meet parents' needs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 40.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Barriers and Enablers Affecting Successful Implementation of the Electronic Health Service Sisom: Multicenter Study of Child Participation in Pediatric Care2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1-15, article id 14271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children's participation in health care is one of the most important components in the management of their disease. Electronic health (eHealth) services that are adapted to the needs of children have the potential for restructuring how children and professionals work together. Therefore, a digital interactive assessment and communication tool, Sisom, was developed to give children aged between 6 and 12 years a voice in their own health care. However, the implementation of eHealth services such as Sisom in daily practice in pediatric health care is rarely investigated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the process of implementing Sisom for children in pediatric care in Sweden. More specifically, the study aimed to (1) evaluate whether the implementation strategy was conducted as planned, (2) understand the barriers and facilitators of the implementation strategy in pediatric care settings, (3) gain insight into how professionals work with the specific intervention, and (4) gain insight into the usefulness and effects of the intervention from the professionals' perspectives. METHODS: A process evaluation design was used to study the implementation of Sisom at 4 pediatric care centers in Sweden. An extensive amount of qualitative and quantitative data was collected before, during, and after the intervention through self-report checklists, memos, and interviews with professionals. In total, 46 children, aged between 6 and 13 years, participated. The children used Sisom on two occasions during 6 months. When they used Sisom, a printed report formed the basis for a forthcoming dialogue between professionals, children, and their parents. RESULTS: To our knowledge, this is the first implementation study of an eHealth communication tool aimed at strengthening children's participation in pediatric health care. Key factors for successful implementation were alignment of the solution with the values and goals of the organization, health care professionals' beliefs in the usefulness and usability of the solution, and health care professionals' willingness to change their professional roles guided by the solution. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the study show that it is possible to restructure health care delivery toward a child-centered approach, if there is a willingness and preparedness in the organization to implement an eHealth solution with the aim of restructuring the way of working with children's participation. ©Petra Svedberg, Susann Arvidsson, Ingrid Larsson, Ing-Marie Carlsson, Jens M Nygren.

  • 41.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Barriers And Enablers for Successful Implementation of the eHealth Service Sisom for Improved Child Participation in Paediatric Care - A Multi-Centre Study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Barriers And Enablers for Successful Implementation of the eHealth Service Sisom for Improved Child Participation in Paediatric Care - A Multi-Centre Study2019In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 66, no S4, p. S122-S122, article id PPO18 SIOP19-1183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives:

    Participation in healthcare is one of the most important components in management of children’s disease. eHealth services that are adapted to the needs of children have the potential to reorganize how children and professionals work together. The digital interactive communication tool Sisom, was developed to give children in pediatric oncology care “a voice". However, the implementation of eHealth services, such as Sisom, in daily practice is rarely being investigated. The objective of this study was to explore the process and effects of implementing Sisom at four pediatric care centers in Sweden.

    Design/Methods:

    A process and effect evaluation design was used to investigate the implementation of Sisom in a clinical context at four pediatric care centers in Sweden. In total, 46 children, age 6- 13 years, participated and most of them had a cancer diagnosis. The children used Sisom at two occasions during 6 months. Following the use of Sisom, a printed report formed the basis for a forthcoming dialogue between professionals, children and their parents.

    Results:

    Key factors for successful implementation of Sisom was; i) alignment of the solution with values and goals of the organization, ii) professional’s beliefs in the usefulness and usability of the solution, and iii) professional’s willingness to apply changes in their professional roles promoted by the solution. Sisom directed healthcarecommunication from the parents’ voices toward the child’s voice and made children’s needs and preferences explicitly visible in decision-making.Sisom was experienced, by the children, as a user-friendly tool through which they could find ways to express themselves and share information with their parents and healthcare professionals.

    Conclusions:

    The results show how healthcare deliverycan be reorganized towards a child-centered approach, and the importance of implementing an eHealth service to support restructuring ofways of working with children’s participation to succeed with this.

  • 43.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Handling Demands of Success Among Girls and Boys in Primarly School: A Conceptual Model2017In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 316-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress among adolescents in Western societies is becoming an issue of increasing concern, and the global trend of adolescents’ health shows a gradual deterioration that is independent of national differences and increases with age. The aim of this study was to explore the main concern of adolescents and about how they cope with demands in everyday life. Participants were 14–16 years old, and data were collected from three sources. A constructivist grounded theory was used as a method for generating a model of the adolescents’ description of how they cope with demands in their everyday lives. The main concern described by participants in this study was to strive to be successful and to succeed in the present and throughout their lives. We conclude that differences between girls and boys, in terms of coping with demands in their everyday lives, are important to consider in the development of health promotion initiatives targeted at adolescents. © The Author(s) 2016

1 - 43 of 43
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