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  • 1.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    A methodology of loving kindness: how interpersonal neurobiology, compassion, and transference can inform researcher–participant encounters and storytelling2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns some central aspects of methodology in qualitative research: the participants’ and investigators’ storytelling, and the main instruments in many interview-based qualitative studies, the researchers themselves. We discuss several ethical and interpersonal aspects of qualitative research encounters between investigators and their interviewee participants. Interviewing research participants is a fundamentally exploitative process, and we make suggestions for how we can temper that exploitation by giving something of value back to our participants and to make sure the well-being of the participant is not compromised by our actions. Many research topics in qualitative studies concern experiences of stress, distress and trauma, and interviewees re-telling their stories may become retraumatised. Such retraumatisation constitutes abuse on the part of the researcher. To counter potential abuse and exploitation, we discuss how researchers, as the central instruments in interview-based investigations, can use knowledge of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic theory and mindful practice to enable them to hold their participants (and their participants’ stories) in loving care and maybe even help in healing processes. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 2.
    Bean, Corliss
    et al.
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Solstad, Bård Erlend
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Forneris, Tanya
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Longitudinal associations between perceived programme quality, basic needs support and basic needs satisfaction within youth sport: A person-centred approach2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging the importance of longitudinal data to test process-based psychological theories of motivation is critical. The purpose of this study was to use a person-centred approach to identify unique subgroups (i.e. profiles) of youth athletes based on their level of self-reported programme quality (PQ) and basic needs support mid-way through their sport season and investigate potential differences between the subgroups on their self-reported basic needs satisfaction at the end of the sport season. The current study involved 541 Canadian youth athletes (males n = 289; females n = 250; gender-fluid n = 2) within 52 sport programmes over the course of 18 months. Youthathletes ranged in age from 8 through 19 (M = 13.76, SD = 2.61). A latent profile analysis (LPA) in Mplus 8.0 was used to carry out the analyses. The LPA revealed three distinct profiles based on youth athletes’ levels of self-reported PQ and basic needs support. Specifically, athletes who perceived their sport experience to be of higher quality and supported their basic psychological needs midway through the sport season also reported higher levels of basic needs satisfaction at season end. Results from this study contribute to the field of sport psychology through understanding how basic needs theory contributes to the dimensions of programme quality and by informing recommendations for future coach education on how to satisfy youth athletes’ basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness through programmedelivery. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 3.
    Billsten, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Robert
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) test used in the implementation of assessment instruments and treatment methods in a Swedish National study2018In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ISSN 0740-5472, E-ISSN 1873-6483, Vol. 84, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational climate and related factors are associated with outcome and are as such of vital interest for healthcare organizations. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) is the questionnaire used in the present study to assess the influence of organizational factors on implementation success. The respondents were employed in one of 203 Swedish municipalities within social work and psychiatric substance/abuse treatment services. They took part in a nationwide implementation project organized by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR), commissioned by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Aim The aims were: (a) to identify classes (clusters) of employees with different ORC profiles on the basis of data collected in 2011 and (b) to investigate ORC profiles which predicted the use of assessment instruments, therapy methods and collaborative activities in 2011 and 2013. Design and recruitment The evaluation study applied a naturalistic design with registration of outcome at consecutive assessments. The participants were contacted via official e-mail addresses in their respective healthcare units and were encouraged by their officials to participate on a voluntary basis. Statistics Descriptive statistics were obtained using SPSS version 23. A latent profile analysis (LPA) using Mplus 7.3 was performed with a robust maximum likelihood estimator (MLR) to identify subgroups (clusters) based on the 18 ORC indexes. Results A total of 2402 employees responded to the survey, of whom 1794 (74.7%) completed the ORC scores. Descriptive analysis indicated that the respondents were a homogenous group of employees, where women (72.0%) formed the majority. Cronbach's alpha for the 18 ORC indexes ranged from α = 0.67 to α = 0.78. A principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution explaining 62% of the variance in total ORC scores. The factors were: motivational readiness (α = 0.64), institutional resources (α = 0.52), staff attributes (α = 0.76), and organizational climate (α = 0.74). An LPA analysis of the four factors with their three distinct profiles provided the best data fit: Profile 3 (n = 614), Profile 2 (n = 934), and Profile 1 (n = 246). Respondents with the most favorable ORC scores (Profile 3) used significantly more instruments and more treatment methods and had a better collaborating network in 2011 as well as in 2013 compared to members in Profile 1, the least successful profile. Conclusion In a large sample of social work and healthcare professionals, ORC scores reflecting higher institutional resources, staff attributes and organizational climate and lower motivational readiness for change were associated with a successful implementation of good practice guidelines for the care and treatment of substance users in Sweden. Low motivational readiness as a construct may indicate satisfaction with the present situation. As ORC proved to be an indicator of successful dissemination of evidence-based guidelines into routine and specialist healthcare, it can be used to tailor interventions to individual employees or services and to improve the dissemination of and compliance with guidelines for the treatment of substance users. © 2017

  • 4.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Center for Collaborative Palliative Care , Department of Health and Caring Sciences , Växjö , Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 5.
    Chan, Derwin K. C.
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong & Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hagger, Martin S.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Inter-Item Distance Changes the Predictive Power of Motivation on Health Behavior?: A Randomised Controlled Trial2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no Suppl. 1, p. S237-S237, article id O730Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Chan, Derwin K. C.
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong & Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yang, Sophie X.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia & Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hagger, Martin S.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Response-Order Effects in Survey Methods: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study in the Context of Sport Injury Prevention2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 666-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consistency tendency is characterized by the propensity for participants responding to subsequent items in a survey consistent with their responses to previous items. This method effect might contaminate the results of sport psychology surveys using cross-sectional design. We present a randomized controlled crossover study examining the effect of consistency tendency on the motivational pathway (i.e., autonomy support → autonomous motivation → intention) of self-determination theory in the context of sport injury prevention. Athletes from Sweden (N = 341) responded to the survey printed in either low inter-item distance (IID; consistency tendency likely) or high IID (consistency tendency suppressed) on two separate occasions, with a one-week interim period. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups, and they received the survey of different IID at each occasion. Bayesian structural equation modeling showed that low IID condition had stronger parameter estimates than high IID condition, but the differences were not statistically significant. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 7.
    Clement, Damien
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United Kingdom.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Investigating the influence of intra-individual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1461-1466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that high levels of stress and stress responsivity can increase the risk of injuries. However, most of the research that has supported this notion has focused on between-person relationships, ignoring the relationships at the within-person level. As a result, the objective of this study was to investigate if within-person changes in perceived stress symptoms over a 1-month time period could predict injury rates during the subsequent 3 months. A prospective design with two measurement points (Time 1—at the beginning of the season and Time 2—1 month into the season) was utilized. A total of 121 competitive soccer players (85 males and 36 females; Mage = 18.39, SD = 3.08) from Sweden and the United States completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (KPDS) and a demographic sheet at Time 1. The KPDS was also completed at Time 2, and all acute injuries that occurred during the subsequent 3-month period were recorded. A Bayesian latent change scores model was used to determine whether within-person changes in stress symptoms could predict the risk of injury. Results revealed that there was a credible positive effect of changes in stress symptoms on injury rates, indicating that an increase in reported stress symptoms was related to an increased risk for injury. This finding highlights the importance of creating caring and supportive sporting environments and relationships and teaching stress management techniques, especially during the earlier portion of competitive seasons, to possibly reduce the occurrence of injuries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 8.
    Edvardsson, Arne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?2012In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), ISSN 1303-2968, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 331-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney Utests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. © Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.

  • 9.
    Fallby, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hagen, Kjetil
    Lilja, Henric
    Parental support as a predictors to success in adolescent male football2011In: Proceedings of the 13th European Congress of Sport Psychology, Madeira, Portugal. FEPSAC on-line publication, 2011, p. 308-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine if parental support could predict elite academy participation in an adolescent football population. The participants were 767 adolescent male football players, where 443 represented an academy team and 324 represented lower ranked teams, in age between 11 and 18. The participants were classified into three groups; a) children (11-12 years), b) youth (13-15 years) and c) junior (16-18 years). The questionnaire used was the Swedish health survey developed by the Swedish Health Institute with a number of football specific items added. Parental support was measured with six items that all measured emotional support (for example if the player experience that his parents understand, listen to, and treat him fair).One way ANOVA showed that academy players reported significant higher level of parental support then the non–academy players in children (F(1, 196)= 7,071, p = 0,008) and junior ages (F(1,194) = 10,830, p = 0,001). A logistic regression showed that parental support predicted approximately 68% of the players belonging accurate both in the children- (68,2%) and junior (67,9%) sample.The result supports previous findings showing that adaptive coping resources, such as social support seeking, could predict athletic success (Yperen, 2009). One recommendation for football clubs with youth academies is to involve parents in the social support network in order to give the players more adaptive coping resources. Further, educating parents about demands and career transitions that the players are exposed to in an elite academy could be beneficial in a developmental perspective.

  • 10.
    Fallby, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Swedish Football Association, Solna, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lilja, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Hagen, Kjetil
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Psychosocial predictors of well-being among junior players in Swedish football academies2012In: Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Science and Soccer, 2012, p. 142-142Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 398-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to identify adjustment patterns in the JST based on athletes’ dynamics of adjustment during a two-and-a–half-year period, and (b) to describe the athletes’ demographic, personal and transitional characteristics at the beginning of the JST that were related to the different adjustment patterns. This quantitative longitudinal study consisted of five measurements conducted approximately every six months over a two-and-a-half-year period. One instrument was used to measure the transition variables and three instruments to measure personal characteristics. In the first measurement, 101 club-based Swedish athletes with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) took part. The latent profile analysis (LPA) on athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment provided three profiles with different patterns in the JST. Profile 1 had a progressive adjustment pattern, whereas the second profile had a regressive adjustment pattern, and the third profile had a sustainable adjustment pattern. The descriptive statistics and Cohen’s d indicated that there were differences (with variation in magnitude) between the three profiles at the first measurement in terms of how athletes perceived different transitional characteristics. Keeping a primary focus on sport (but also having attention to other spheres of life), high athletic identity and motivation to reach senior level were characteristics relevant for both progressive and sustainable adjustment patterns. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 12.
    Hinic, Hansi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Utvärdering av Idrottslyftet, en delrapport2010Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hofseth, Erik
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Toering, Tynke
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Jordet, Geir
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Self-evaluation of skills and performance level in youth elite soccer: Are positive self-evaluations always positive?2017In: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, ISSN 2157-3905, E-ISSN 2157-3913, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 370-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared youth elite soccer players’ and their coaches’ evaluations of players’ skill level, and examined how this comparison was related to players' future performance level concerning national team experience. Based on the notions of the self-serving bias, it was predicted that players who overestimated their skill level relative to their coaches’ judgment, would be characterized by a high performance level in the past and a relative low future performance level; due to relatively high levels of performance anxiety and a frequent use of self-protection strategies. Results showed that the players (N= 267, Mage = 17.6, SD = 1.1), in reference to their coach, tended to overestimate their skills. This tendency was negatively related to players’ future performance level. Specifically, when controlling for age, past performance level and current performance level, a multinomial regression analysis (X² 18, N = 238) = 76.95, p ˂ .01) revealed that the players who overestimated their skills to the largest extent (compared to players that underestimated their skills), were less likely to produce a high performance level in the future (OR = .71, 95% CI = .54 - 18 .94). It seems that unrealistically positive self-evaluations can have negative effects in terms of performance development, but not through the mechanism of the self-serving bias, as measured in the current study. Nevertheless, it may be important for players to have a realistic view on their skill-level in order to progress and reach their potential. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  • 14.
    Ingrell, Joakim
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined (a) the developmental trajectories of student-athlete burnout perceptions and (b) the within-person relationship between achievement goals and burnout perceptions. A three-year and six-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 78 student-athletes (30 young women and 48 young men, Mage at T1 = 12.7 years, SD = 0.44), attending a sport compulsory school. The Athlete Burnout Questionnaire and the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire were used. The results from multilevel growth models revealed that burnout perceptions increased for this age group over the three-year period. Furthermore, task orientation was significantly and negatively related to a reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. The results from this study underline the advantage of considering developmental processes when studying burnout. Furthermore, by focusing on the within-person effect of achievement goals, this study provides findings that support a motivational approach to the longitudinally study of burnout propensity among young student-athletes. The current study suggests that sport school staff should be aware of their student-athletes’ burnout perceptions and that these could change over time. Results also highlights that task-oriented goals might help decrease burnout perceptions, specifically reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 15.
    Ingrell, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Sport Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Department of Sport Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Relationships between ego-oriented peer climate, perceived competence and worry about sport performance: A longitudinal study of student-athlete2016In: Sport Science Review, ISSN 2066-8732, E-ISSN 2069-7244, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 225-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a sample of student-athletes’ (N=64) first year (seventh grade) enrolled at a school with a sport profile, the aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate (a) levels and changes as regards to worry about sport performance, perception of peer climate, and perceived competence; and (b) the relationship in levels and changes between these studied variables. The primary results from latent growth models (LGMs) and parallel process LGMs revealed that, during their first year, the student-athletes’ level of worry and perceived ego-oriented peer climate increased, whereas perceived competence decreased. Further, the results showed that perceived competence was negatively associated with worry at the beginning of the students’ first year. The slope of perceived ego-oriented peer climate was positively associated with the slope of worry. Future research in relation to the findings is discussed, and recommendations for future actions are given.

  • 16.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    En explorativ studie gällande utvecklandet av perception reaction sports test (PRST)2010In: Årsbok: Svensk idrottspsykologisk förening, SIPF / [ed] Magnus Lindwall, Urban Johnson, Stockholm: Andrén & Holm , 2010, p. 86-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Perceptionsprocessen är grunden för en rad olika färdigheter både i det vardagliga livet och inom idrotten. Exempel på processer där perceptionen är involverade är intag av stimuli samt beslutsfattande (Goldstein, 2007). För att mäta en idrottares perceptionsförmåga är det viktigt att utveckla adekvata mätinstrument. Ett idrottsspecifikt test är PRST. Syftet med denna studie var att undersöka ”Perception Reaction Sports Tests” test – retest reliabilitet. Resultatet visade en test – retest reliabilitet med Pearson r =.693, som kunde förklara 48 % av variationen, ett moderat korrelationsvärde. Det är i framtiden viktigt att utveckla fler idrottsspecifika test för att på ett tillförlitligt och relevant sätt studera idrottsspecifika perceptionsegenskaper för undersökt idrott.

  • 17.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Vad är ett meningsfullt resultat?2012In: Flow, ISSN 1654-2533, no 2, p. 3p. 4-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The researcher in loving care: Inter-relatedness behind a mindfulness and sport injury prevention study2017In: Being Mindful in Sport and Exercise Psychology, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 215-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    What counts as ”Evidence” in Evidence-Based practice? Searching for some fire behind all the smoke2016In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some sorts of “evidence” in evidence-based practice seem to carry more weight (e.g., randomized controlled trials; RCTs) than others (e.g., case studies) in applied sport and exercise psychology research. In this article we explore some of the shibboleths of evidence-based treatment, and how some “gold standards,” such as RCTs (as they are often used or misused) may, when sub-optimally executed, provide only tenuous, incomplete, and confounded evidence for what we choose to do in practice. We inquire into the relevance and meaningfulness of practitioner-evacuated research and investigations that use flawed statistical reasoning, and we also ask a central question in evaluating evidence: just because some sorts of positive changes can be measured and counted in various treatment outcome research, do they really “count?” © 2016 Association for Applied Sport Psychology

  • 20.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    School of Sport and Exercise Science and the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport(s) Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden;Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To Adjust or Not Adjust: Nonparametric Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Real-World Meaning2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The main objectives of this article are to: (a) investigate if there are any meaningful differences between adjusted and unadjusted effect sizes (b) compare the outcomes from parametric and non-parametric effect sizes to determine if the potential differences might influence the interpretation of results, (c) discuss the importance of reporting confidence intervals in research, and discuss how to interpret effect sizes in terms of practical real-world meaning.

    Design: Review.

    Method: A review of how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes was conducted. Hypothetical examples were then used to exemplify the issues stated in the objectives.

    Results: The results from the hypothetical research designs showed that: (a) there is a substantial difference between adjusted and non-adjusted effect sizes especially in studies with small sample sizes, and (b) there are differences in outcomes between the parametric and non-parametric effect size formulas that may affect interpretations of results.

    Conclusions: The different hypothetical examples in this article clearly demonstrate the importance of treating data in ways that minimize potential biases and the central issues of how to discuss the meaningfulness of effect sizes in research. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 21.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Things We Still Haven’t Learned (So Far)2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 449-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is like an immortal horse that some researchers have been trying to beat to death for over 50 years, but without any success. In this article we discuss the flaws in NHST, the historical background in relation to both Fisher’s and Neyman-Pearson’s statistical ideas, the common misunderstandings of what p < .05 actually means, and the APA Manual’s (2010) clear, but most often ignored, instructions to report effect sizes and interpret what they all mean in the real world. Also, we discuss how Bayesian statistics can be used to overcome some of the problems with NHST. We then analyze quantitative articles in two of the highest impact factor journals in sport and exercise psychology in the last three years (2012–2014) to determine if we have learned what we should have learned decades ago about the use and meaningful interpretations of the statistics we use. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 22.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Svenska Handbollförbundet.
    Tornberg, Rasmus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Vägen till landslagsspel i ungdomshandboll – ”survival of the mentally fittest”?2011In: SIPF, Svensk Idrottspsykologisk Förening, Årsbok 2010 / [ed] Magnus Lindwall & Urban Johnson, Örebro: Svensk idrottspsykologisk förening , 2011, p. 36-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien var att undersöka om de handbollsspelare som når Riksläger 4 skiljer sig åt i användandet av copingstrategier jämfört med de handbollsspelare som inte når Riksläger 4. Resultatet visade att spelare som deltog på läger R4 uppvisade högre värden av copingstrategierna: coping with adversity,concentration,confidence and achievment against coachability, peaking under pressure och freedomofworry än den gruppen av spelare som endast deltog vid R1. Resultatet tyder på att de spelare som blir uttagna till R4 i högre utsträckning använder sig av effektivare copingstrategier något som även är i linje med tidigare forskning (t.ex. van Yperen, 2009). Författarna rekommenderar därför både tränare och spelare att öka sin kunskap kring copingstrategiers eventuella inverkan på prestation för att kunna optimera den aktives chanser att lyckas.

  • 23.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Hagen, Kjetil
    Lilja, Henrik
    Psychosocial factors influence on subjective well-being among adolescent football players2011In: 7th ENYSSP Workshop: Book of Abstracts, 2011, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Are all predicted relationships linear by nature? A note about quantile regression in sport and exercise psychology2014In: Athletic Insight: The Online Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 1536-0431, E-ISSN 1947-6299, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data in sport and exercise psychology research are often analyzed based on the assumption that the relationships between two or more variables are linear in nature. But are all relationships in sport and exercise settings linear? The aim of this paper is to: a) discuss the potential shortcomings with using linear regression analysis, b) introduce quantile regression analysis (Q-regression) as an alternative to linear regression, and c) give examples of how to use Q-regression analysis in order to overcome some of the shortcomings of linear regression analysis. A comparison between the results from a linear regression analysis and a Q-regression analysis shows differences between the two methods. More specifically, the independent variables in the results of the Q-regression analysis were shown to have non-linear relationships with the dependent variable in given examples. Researchers are encouraged to consider using Q-regression analysis in studies where non-linear relationships could be expected.

  • 25.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Design Issues in Pre-injury Research – A Note on Prediction and Experimental Design2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 40-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last three decades, increased attention has been devoted towards psychological variables influencing injury risk (Hackfort & Kleinert, 2007). Of these prediction studies, a majority have used prospective designs with one single measurement point and continuous injury recording over a number of weeks. In order to grasp the changes in those variables, the use of repeated measure designs with multiple measurement points is warranted. Obtaining data from multiple points will enable use of advanced statistics, such as latent growth curve analysis. Unlike regular analyses (e.g., ANOVAs), growth curve analyses focus on within-person change and how within-person changes in state variables could affect injury risk. Based on findings from injury prediction research, investigators have targeted such variables (e.g., daily hassles, coping) in experimental studies aimed at preventing injuries. A meta-analysis, covering seven experimental studies, showed most studies to be effective in decreasing the number of injuries in the experimental groups (overall Hedges g Effect size = .81; Tranaeus, Ivarsson & Johnson, submitted). Even if the experimental studies have used true or quasi-experimental designs, several methodological issues can be addressed. First, in most of the studies a number of different mental skills are included in the intervention approach leading to difficulties in differentiating which specific mental skills may be responsible for producing reductions in injury. Second, since most of the experimental studies conducted used no-attentional control groups (i.e., the participants in these groups will not be given a placebo treatment), it is likely that large effects could be explained by the Hawthorn effect. Third, in most studies, researchers discuss the importance of their results based on suggested cut-off criteria for the p-values and/or effect sizes (ES). This procedure could be addressed as a limitation since p-values and/or effect sizes do not indicate anything about the results’ clinical significance (e.g., Ivarsson, Andersen, Johnson & Lindwall, 2013). Also, the fact that non-adjusted ES, which were reported in all studies providing ES, are positively biased due to sampling error (Synder & Lawson, 1993) might have led to overestimation of the intervention effects. This presentation will (a) highlight the designs of previous prediction studies while focusing on advantages of longitudinal repeated-measure designs (b) discuss different experimental designs that have been used in injury prevention research and, (c) suggest methodological and statistical considerations for future research on injury prevention.

  • 26.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    History of Stressors Impact on Sport Injury Occurrence: A Meta-Analysis2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 275-275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The probably most frequently cited model in sport injury prediction from a psychological perspective is Williams and Andersen's (1998) “stress injury model”. In the model it is suggested three categories of psychological factors, i.e. personality, history of stressors and coping will influence the athletes’ response to a potentially stressful situation. Most research attention the last 10 years has focused on the category history of stressors. This category includes different types of stressors such as negative life event stress, positive life event stress, hassle and previous injuries. Given that history of stressors has gained most attention in sport injury research the aim of the study was to, in meta-analysis, investigate the joint as well as separate effects of published studies aimed to investigate history of stressors impact on injury occurrence. The literature review resulted in 49 included articles. Of these 49 articles, 36 provided sufficient information for calculation for an r to z-transformation. In the total sample of selected studies, 67 different effect sizes could be calculated. The overall correlation effect size for the relationship between Stressors and injury occurrence were .129 (p<.001), 95 % CI (.096,-.161) using a random effect model. The results indicated heterogeneity between studies (Q = 214.41, df = 66, p < .001). Moreover, the results showed that negative life event stress (r = .184) and previous injuries (r = .225) displayed the strongest correlation with injury occurrence while positive life event stress showed the weakest (r = .023). Last, the result from a meta-regression confirmed that high methodological quality was related to higher correlational effects (β = .018 (.005), p < .001, 95 % CI = .009 - .03). Even if the correlational coefficient only showed a low to moderate overall effect it is suggested that stressors have an important impact on injury risk. This line of argument is for example supported by the calculated fail-and safe number indicating that 3,196 studies with zero effect results would be necessary to decrease the effect to zero. Given that stress seems to influence injury risk athletes are recommended to take part in life style interventions (e.g. mindfulness), to develop effective strategies for decrease their stress levels.

  • 27.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychological factors as predictors of injuries among senior soccer players: a prospective study2010In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), ISSN 1303-2968, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is reported that between 65–91% of elite soccer players in Sweden have at least one injury per year (Hägglund, 2007). Several studies define different physiological and psychological factors affecting athletic injury-risk. A number of models contain proposals that specify relationships between psychological factors and an increased athletic injury-risk. Examples include Williams and Andersen’s (1998) stress-injury model and Johnson and Ivarsson’s (in press) empirical model of injury risk factors which proposes that factors such as trait anxiety and ineffective coping skills are influential. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between (a) personality factors, b) coping variables, and (c) stress and injury risk. Participants were 48 male soccer players from 3 Swedish teams ranging in age from 16 to 36 years (M = 22 years). Participants completed 5 questionnaires: Football Worry Scale, Swedish universities Scales of Personality, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Daily Hassle Scale and Brief COPE. Information on injuries was collected by athletic trainers of the teams over 3-months. Results suggest injury was significantly predicted by 4 personality trait predictors: somatic trait anxiety, psychic trait anxiety, stress susceptibility, and trait irritability. Collectively, the predictors self-blame and acceptance could explain 14.6% of injury occurrence. More injuries were reported among players who score high in daily hassles. These results support previous findings (e.g. Fawkner et al., 1999). Recommendations are given for both the athletes and the trainers on working to prevent sport injuries.

  • 28.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Psychological predictors of injury occurrence: A prospective investigation of competitive Swedish soccer players2011In: Sport and Exercise Psychology: Human Performance, Well-Being and Health : Proceedings of the 13th FEPSAC European Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] Sidonio Serpa, Nelson Teixeira, Maria Joao Almeida, Antonio Rosado, Funchal: Instituto do Desporto da Região Autónoma da Madeira, IP-RAM (IDRAM, IP-RAM) , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involvement in competitive soccer is associated with high injury rates (Hägglund, 2007). In an attempt to identify psychosocial injury risk factors, several conceptual models have been developed, for example, Williams and Andersen Stress Injury Model (1998). The aim of the present study was to prospectively examine whether personality variables, stress and coping styles predicted injury occurrence in an elite soccer population. Fifty six soccer players competing in the Swedish Premiere Division completed four questionnaires prior to the start of the competitive season. These included: the Swedish University Scale of Personality, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Football Worry Scale, and Brief COPE. Subsequent to the initial data collection, participants completed the Daily Hassle and Uplift Scale, once per week for a 13-week period, and all injuries requiring a minimum 1-day absence from competition were recorded by team physiotherapists. A path analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of specific personality (e.g., somatic trait anxiety), stress and coping variables on injury frequency. Results suggest a model in which daily hassles mediate the relationship between anxiety, negative life event stress, social worry and injury, accounting for 24% of the variance in injury occurrence. This finding supports previous research highlighting the role of anxiety and chronic stress in injury vulnerability (Johnson & Ivarsson, in press). Findings suggest the need for players, coaches and physiotherapists to address both major negative life events and daily hassles in minimizing injury risk. It is also recommended that coaches develop individualized stress monitoring programs for diminishing injury occurrence.

  • 29.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychological predictors of sport injuries among soccer players2009In: Book of abstracts / 5 Workshop of the European Network of Young Specialists in Sport Psychology, 2009, p. 34-35Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 65 – 91 % of elite soccer players have at least one injury / year (Hägglund, 2007). Several researches have established models that specify psychological factors that could predict sport injuries. Two examples are Rogers and Landers (2005) stress – coping model and Williams and Andersen´s (1998) stress – injury model. The main purpose of the study was to single out significant psychological factors that could lead to an increased injury risk among soccer players. The participants were 152 male and female soccer players (m = 17, 6) studying at soccer high schools in southwest Sweden. Five questionnaires were used STAI, SAS, LESCA, ACSI – 28 and SSP. Continuously injury record was collected by athletic trainers at the school, during a period of six months. The result suggested that there are four significant predictors that in all could explain 23 % of the injuries. The main factors are life event stress, somatic trait anxiety, mistrust and negative coping. These findings are in unison with for example Williams and Andersen´s (1998) stress – injury model and should be considered by coaches when it comes to preventing sport injuries among their athletes.

  • 30.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Upplevd stress ökar risken för fotbollsskada2013In: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, no 3, p. 21-23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Altemyr, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    It Pays to Pay Attention: A Mindfulness-Based Program for Injury Prevention with Soccer Players2015In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 319-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which a mindfulness-based program could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of soccer players. A total of 41 junior elite soccer players were randomly assigned to the treatment or the attentional control group. The treatment group took part in a 7-session program based on the mindfulness, acceptance, and commitment (MAC) approach (Gardner & Moore, 2007). The attentional control group was offered 7 sessions of sport psychology presentations with a particular focus on soccer. There were no statistically significant differences in injury rates between the two groups (U (39) = 149.50, z= −1.77, p = .077), but there was a medium effect size (adjusted Cohen´s d = −0.59, approx. 80% CI for d = −0.37 – −0.74). Moreover, 67% of the players in the mindfulness group remained injury-free in comparison to 40% in the control group. This result suggests that an intervention program focusing on strategies for improving attention could decrease injury risk. Recommendations include applying mindfulness exercises in athletes’ daily training to help lower injury risk. © 2015, Copyright © Association for Applied Sport Psychology.

  • 32.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychosocial predictors of sport injury rates: A meta-analysis2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 173-174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport injury prediction research has traditionally focused on physiological and physical factors. Nevertheless, during the last 30 years there has been increased interest in psychosocial factors related to sport injuries. The most cited theoretical model developed to explain psychosocial variables’ influences on injury risk is the model of stress and athletic injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). The model, suggests that personality (e.g., anxiety, hardiness), history of stressors (e.g., life event stress, daily hassles), and coping (e.g., social support resources) will influence athletes’ stress responses (e.g., physiological, attentional changes) that, in turn, are related to injury risk. The aim of the study was to examine the past research on the relationships of the psychosocial variables in the model (i.e., personality, history of stressors, coping, stress responses) on sport injury rates. The literature review resulted in 47 published studies and 180 effect sizes. The results showed that stress responses (r = .22, 80% CI = .14 - .30) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Moreover, history of stressors (r = .12, 80% CI = .11 - .13) and coping (r = -.05, 80% CI = -.03 - -.08) had smaller relationships with injury rates. Finally, the associations of positive (r = .01, 80% CI = -.03 - .04), as well as negative (r = .01, 80% CI = -.01-.03) personality variables on injury rates was marginal. The results support the model’s suggestion that stress responses have a direct relationship with injury, whereas other variables potentially have indirect relationships with injury rates. In line with these findings it is suggested that intervention programs should focus on helping athletes decrease the magnitude of their stress responses. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 33.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention2017In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have suggested that psy- chosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation.

    Objectives: The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interven- tions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention).

    Methods: Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention.

    Results: The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups.

    Conclusion: The results support the model’s suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016 

  • 34.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Edvardsson, Arne
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Psychologically based programs for injury prevention in football: a meta-analysis2015In: Program and Abstracts: 8th World Congress on Science and Football Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015 / [ed] Jens Bangsbo and Peter Krustrup, Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee , 2015, p. 69-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have found that stress increases the risk for sport injuries. It is therefore suggested that psychologically based intervention programs, targeting perceived stress, could decrease injury risk. The objective of the study, using a meta-analysis procedure, was to evaluate the effect of psychologically based interventions, performed in football populations and based on documented injury rates. A literature search founded on the electronic databases; PsycINFO, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar were examined using combinations of key words, such as ‘sports injury’, ‘psychology’, ‘intervention’ ‘prevention’ ‘soccer’ and ‘football’. The literature review resulted in three studies that together contained 100 participants. The interventions were based on different approaches such as mindfulness, and mental skills training. All studies, included in the analysis, reported fewer injuries for the experimental groups in comparison to the control groups (Cohen’s d effect sizes 0.89, 0.59, and 1.27). The overall results correspond to a Cohen’s d effect size of 0.86, p <.001, (95 % CI 0.44-1.28). The result indicated that psychologically based intervention programs have potential to decrease the risk of sport injuries in football populations. These results are in line with intervention studies performed within others sports (e.g. floorball). One reason for the effectiveness of the intervention could be that all three were offering stress management education. Because sport injuries have a negative impact on athletes, teams and communities, athletes are recommended to work with psychological training programs as a part of their injury prevention work. © The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee

  • 35.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Karlsson, Jón
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden & Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waldén, Markus
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden & Department of Orthopaedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad-Ystad Hospitals, Sweden.
    Elite female footballers’ stories of sociocultural factors, emotions, and behaviours prior to anterior cruciate ligament injury2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine how players’ perceptions of sociocultural factors and intra- and interpersonal aspects of sporting experiences may have influenced the emotions, cognitions, and behaviours of elite female soccer players prior to the occurrence of ACL injuries. The research questions guiding the study were: (a) how did female elite soccer players perceive that their psychosocial experiences were related to their cognitive, physiological, and emotional states prior to their ACL injuries, and (b) how did the players feel their perceived states influenced their behaviours prior to injury occurrence. The participants consisted of the total population of female players (N = 18) competing in the Swedish women’s elite league, who incurred a total ACL tear during the 2012 season. Using a semi-structured interview guide, all players were interviewed post-season. We represented the data using a storytelling approach of aggregated creative nonfiction. The aggregated stories showed sociocultural rules and expectations of overtraining and placing pressure on athletes to play even if they were not physically or psychologically fit. Responding to pressures with potentially risk-increasing behaviours might raise the probability of becoming injured through a number of pathways. Team managers, coaches, and members of the medical team are recommended to develop environments that stimulate the players to engage in adaptive stress-recovery and risk-decreasing behaviours.

  • 36.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Could level and change in psychosocial stress during a 7 week period predict sport injuries in a population of professional soccer players?2012In: Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Science and Soccer, 2012, p. 163-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Itroduction: Involvement in competitive soccer is connected with a high injury rate (Hägglund, 2007). Previous research has suggested that a psychosocial stress (both major and minor stressors) have a great impact on injury risk (Rogers & Landers, 2005; Fawkner et al., 1999).

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate if individual level and change in psychosocial stress (daily hassle) during a 7 week period could predict injuries among Swedish Premiere League soccer players.

    Method: The participants were 56 (38 males and 18 females) Swedish Premiere League soccer players. Participants ranged in age from 16 – 36 years (M = 25, 05, SD = 5, 46). Participants completed the Hassle and Uplift Scale once a week for a 7-week period. During the research period, the physiotherapists for each team were asked to record any injuries occurring during the study period. Latent grpwth curve models were used to examine whether the level and change in psychological stress could predict the frequency of injury over the 7 week period.

    Result: The results showed that both high initial levels of daily hassle and negative changes in it were associated with more injuries. Moreover, intra-class correlation showed that 23,4 % of the variance in hassle over the 7 repeated observations could be explained by the within-person variance, whereas the majority of variance (76,6%) could be attributed to between-person variance.

    Discussion: The findings highlight the importance of focusing on state variables using prospective designs and appropriate change analysis in order to detect complex and dynamic associations across time in injury prediction research. It is also important to acknowledging and investigating individual differeces in order to understand how psychosocial stressors influence different athletes. Recommendations for players, coaches and physiotherapies are to be observant of the influence from daily hassles in order to be able to help the athlete to decrease injury risk by for example adjusting his/her training load due to psychological status.

  • 37.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University & Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Altemyr, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fatigue as a Predictor of Sport Injuries: A Latent Class Analysis2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 99-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has showed that psychosocial factors such as fatigue, could increase risk of injury (Borotikar et al., 2008; Johnson, 2011). Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the potential risk of different developmental trajectory profiles in fatigue, over three weeks, for injury among Swedish junior elite soccer players. Participants were 91 junior elite soccer players at the soccer high schools (64 male and 33 female) aged between 15-18 years (M =16.57, SD = .75). All players were asked, at a weekly basis during the first three weeks of pre-season, to complete the fatigue sub-scale from Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes-Sport (Kellman & Kallus, 2001). Two months after, the athletic trainers of the participants were asked to record any injury that occurred in the last two months. Latent class analysis was performed to analyze the data. Sample adjusted BIC was used to evaluate the goodness-of-fit and to help select the best fitted model (Yang, 1998). Relative risk ratios were calculated to compare the injury risk between participants in various latent classes identified from the latent class analysis. The model with best fit (BIC = 832, entropy .77) contained four different latent classes (i.e., low stable, moderate stable, high increasing, high decreasing). Members of the low stable class characterized by low levels of fatigue over the three-week period (Intercept = 2.5, slope = -.16) were selected as the reference class when calculating relative risk rations. Members of the high increasing class, experiencing high and increasing level of fatigue over the three-week period (Intercept = 4.94, slope = .29), were exposed to the highest risk of injury (RR = 2.53), compared with the reference class, and with other classes. Results from the participants included in the two other classes as (1) the moderate stable, characterized by a stable moderate level of fatigue during the course of assessment (Intercept = 3.78, slope = .14), and (2) the high decreasing, with high but decreasing level of fatigue during the three-week period (Intercept= 5.97, slope = -1.14), were both exposed to a 1.63 greater risk of injury than the reference class. The result indicates that high levels of fatigue might increase the risks of injury among soccer players. In other words, players’ risk in sport might potentially be reduced by proper recovery protocols. It is therefore highly recommended that coaches and medical staff should work actively and continuously with athletes to aid their physical and psychological recovery.

  • 38.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Altemyr, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychosocial stress as a predictor of injury in elite junior soccer: A latent growth curve analysis2014In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 366-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate by use of a latent growth curve analysis framework whether athletes' individual levels and changes in hassle and uplift levels over a 10-week period could predict injury outcome in an elite junior soccer population.

    DESIGN: A prospective design with repeated measurement points.

    METHODS: Participants were 101 Swedish elite junior soccer players (67 males and 34 females). Ten sets of measures were taken on a weekly basis during which participants completed the Hassles and Uplifts Scale (HUS). Latent growth curve models were used to examine whether the level and change in psychological stress could predict the frequency of injury over the 10-week period.

    RESULTS: The results show that injury occurrence was significantly associated with both the initial level of daily hassle and the change in daily hassle. High initial daily hassle levels and a smaller decrease in daily hassles were associated with injury occurrence. Moreover, injury occurrence was significantly associated with a greater decrease in daily uplift.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the importance of focusing on state variables using prospective designs and appropriate analysis of within-person change to detect complex and dynamic associations across time in injury-prediction research.

    Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Podlog, Leslie
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Utah, Utah, USA.
    Psychological predictors of injury occurrence: A prospective investigation of professional Swedish soccer players2013In: Journal of sport rehabilitation, ISSN 1056-6716, E-ISSN 1543-3072, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context:

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a high injury risk. Previous research has found a great number of risk factors (both physiological and psychological) that could increase injury risk.1 One limitation in previous studies is that few have considered the complex interaction between psychological factors in their research design.

    Objective: To study whether personality, stress and coping predicted injury occurrence in an elite soccer population based on a hypothesized model.

    Design: Prospective.

    Participants: 56 (n = 38 males, n = 18 females) Swedish Premiere league soccer players were selected based on convenience sampling.

    Intervention: Participants completed four questionnaires including the: Swedish Universities Scales of Personality,2 Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes,3 and Brief COPE4 during the initial questionnaire administration. Subsequent to the first meeting, participants also completed the Hassle and Uplift Scale,5 once per week for a 13-week period throughout the competitive season.

    Main Outcome Measures: A path analysis was conducted examining the influence of personality traits (i.e., trait anxiety), state level stressors (i.e., negative life event stress and daily hassles), and coping on injury frequency.

    Results: Results of the path analysis indicated that trait anxiety, negative life event stress, and daily hassle−were significant predictors of injury among professional soccer players accounting for 24% of the variance.

    Conclusion: The findings highlight the need for athletes, coaches and medical practitioners to attempt to reduce state level stressors, especially, daily hassles in minimizing injury risk. Educating and training athletes and coaches in proactive stress management techniques appears warranted.

  • 40.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 241-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the career literature, an injury is termed as a non-normative transition (e.g., Stambulova & Wylleman, 2014), and therefore, it is implied that there is a process behind it. But the injury transition process has never been in focus of the career researchers in sport psychology, and therefore this study is a pioneering exploration unpacking this process. The study was designed as a single subject case study based on a constructivist narrative approach with the objectives (1) to explore the athlete’s career development, injuries within the career and their impact, and (2) to explore in detail the athlete’s injury experiences. The participant was a 26 years old former handball player who had experienced two major ACL-injuries during his career. To guide the research process from formulation of the research objectives and to interpretation of narratives, the narrative oriented inquiry framework or NOI (Hiles & Čermak, 2008) was followed. Following combination of the holistic-content and the categorical content analyses allowed conceptualizing injuries as career transition processes embedded into the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made possible to identify four phases in the injury transition (i.e., pre-injury, injury and first reactions, diagnosis and treatment, rehabilitation and consequences) with distinct psychological content (e.g., demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each phase. Based on the results of the study it is possible to anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of the sport medicine teams might benefit from being aware about specific demands and barriers relevant to the different phases of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes with rehabilitation process and successful comeback to active sport involvement. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 41.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This single-subject case study adopted a narrative approach and focused on two objectives: (a) to explore an athlete’s career development, including the impact of injuries, and (b) to explore that athlete’s injury experiences in detail. The participant was a 26-year-old former elite handball player who had experienced two major anterior cruciate ligament injuries during his career. To guide the research process from the formulation of its objectives to the interpretation of the participant’s narratives, we followed the narrative-oriented inquiry framework. To collect the participant’s stories, a low-structured interview guide consisting of open questions and requests for information about the participant’s handball career and injury experiences was used. The holistic content analysis allowed us to conceptualise injuries as career transition processes embedded in the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made it possible to identify four phases of injury transition and the distinct psychological content (demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each of the four phases. Based on the results of the study, we anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of sport medicine teams can benefit from greater awareness of the specific demands and barriers relevant to each phase of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate the development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes navigate the rehabilitation process and successfully return to active sport involvement. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 42.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Borg, Elin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The predictive ability of the talent development environment on youth elite football players' well-being: A person-centered approach2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 16, no Part 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The objective of this study was to examine the predictive ability of perceived talent development environment (TDE) on the well-being of youth elite football players.

    Design

    A field-based longitudinal design was employed.

    Method

    The participants were 195 Swedish youth elite football players between 13 and 16 years of age enrolled at Swedish football academies. The players responded to questionnaires regarding their perceptions of their TDE, perceived stress, and well-being in the beginning of the competitive season 2012 (T1). On two more occasions, six and 12 months later, the players completed the stress and well-being questionnaires.

    Results

    A latent class analysis, based on the TDEQ sub-scale scores at T1, revealed three classes of players with different perceptions of their TDE (one high quality, one moderate quality, and one poor quality class). A second-order multivariate latent growth curve model (factor-of-curves model) showed that the class of players perceiving the lowest TDE quality, experienced higher initial level of stress and lower initial level of well-being at T1 compared to the other two classes. Moreover, there were no significant differences in slopes for neither stress nor well-being between classes (the initial difference between the three groups, in well-being, remained stable over time).

    Conclusion

    The results indicate that players perceiving their TDE as supporting and focusing on long-term development seem to be less stressed and experience higher well-being than other players. Hence, in addition to facilitate sport-specific development and performance among youth athletes, high quality TDEs may be important for youth elite athletes' general well-being.

  • 43.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå Universitet Umeå, Sverige.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Borg, Elin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kan talangmiljön påverka psykisk hälsa hos unga akademifotbollsspelare?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Performance and Training Unit, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), 3Musculoskeletal & Sports Injury Epidemiology Center, IMM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Negative psychological responses of injury and rehabilitation adherence effects on return to play in competitive athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis2017In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 8, p. 27-32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research offers evidence that psychological factors influence an injured athlete during the rehabilitation process. Our first objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results from all published studies that examined the relationships among negative affective responses after sport injuries, rehabilitation adherence, and return to play (RTP). The second objective was to use a meta-analytic path analysis to investigate whether an indirect effect existed between negative affective responses and RTP through rehabilitation adherence. This literature review resulted in seven studies providing 14 effect sizes. The results from the meta-analysis showed that negative affective responses had a negative effect on successful RTP, whereas rehabilitation adherence had a positive effect on RTP. The results from the meta-analytic path analysis showed a weak and nonsignificant indirect effect of negative affective responses on RTP via rehabilitation adherence. These results underline the importance of providing supportive environments for injured athletes to increase the chances of successful RTP via a decrease in negative affective responses and increase in rehabilitation adherence.

  • 45.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Managing injuries among young athletes2017In: Sport Psychology for young athletes / [ed] Camilla J. Knight, Chris G. Harwood, Daniel Gould, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 174-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Otillräcklig återhämtning ökar skaderisken2010In: Svensk Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 22-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychological predictors of sport injuries among junior soccer players2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous researches have established models that specifypsychological factors that could predict sport injuries. One example is Williams and Andersen’s stress–injury modelstressing factors such as anxiety, negative life stress and few coping resources. The purpose of the current study was to find psychological factors that could lead to an increased injury risk among junior soccer players, in addition to construct an empirical model of injury risk factors for soccer players. The participants were 108 male and female soccer players (m = 17,6) studying at soccer high schools in southwest Sweden. Five questionnaires were used, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Sport Anxiety Scale, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 and Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Injury record was collected by athletic trainers at the schools during a period of 8 months. The result suggested four significant predictors that together could explain 23% of injury occurrence.The main factors are life event stress, somatic trait anxiety, mistrust and ineffective coping. These findings partly support Williams and Andersen’s stress–injury model and are organized into an empirical model. Recommendations are given to sport medicine teams and coaches concerning issues in sport injury prevention.

  • 48.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Psychosocial factors and sport injuries: prediction, prevention and future research directions2017In: Current Opinion in Psychology, ISSN 2352-250X, Vol. 16, p. 89-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review provides an overview of recent theoretical and empirical developments regarding psychosocial factors related to the prediction and prevention of sport injuries, and highlights some of the most interesting areas of investigation that have been carried out in the past few years. For instance, a systematic review of the most cited and used theoretical framework in the field has recently been performed, which supports the model's suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. Based on substantial empirical evidence it is also shown that changes in stress and perceived recovery appear to predict injury occurrence in sport. Current studies, focusing on overuse injuries, also suggest that cultural norms and rules can be seen as factors that can indirectly influence the risk of becoming injured. Future research directions are presented such as the need for interdisciplinary injury prevention programs based on a combination of physiological and psychological interventions. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 49.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stressors as Antecedents to Sport Injuries: A Psychological Perspective2013In: Advances in Psychology Research: Volume 97 / [ed] Alexandra M. Columbus, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stressors as antecedents to sport injuries: A psychological perspective2013In: Psychology of Injuries: Risk factors, perspectives andlong-term implications / [ed] Alexandra M. Columbus, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 88-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 87
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