hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Entrepreneurs’ imprinting history influences on international new venture creation2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    The role of entrepreneurs’ imprinting in the creation of born global firms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows how imprinting episodes in entrepreneurs’ childhood and prior life story influence their mind-sets, which influence the entrepreneur’s venture creation and their firms international behaviour. Depending on the imprinting experiences, entrepreneurs develop skills and mind-sets with preferences and especially desires that will affect the total behaviour of their future organization.  The study also shows how firms’ international growth can be an important part of a firm’s strategy, but also a consequence of strategy that not per se include internationalization.

  • 3.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The role of the entrepreneur in the international new venture – opening the black box2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant research output in recent decades on international new ventures (INVs),little attention has been paid to understanding the processes and conditions under whichthe entrepreneur identifies and exploits an opportunity and subsequently creates valuewithin the firm. As a result, the dynamics involved in the role of the entrepreneur during theestablishment and internationalization of INVs remain in a black box. In order to understandthe context, interaction among players and other dynamics involved before, during, and afterthe establishment of the INV’s creation and development, a different approach is needed. Theaim of this dissertation is to describe and understand the role of entrepreneurs in the processof establishment and internationalization of international new ventures.

    Three longitudinal case studies were conducted between 1999 and 2008 with a total of 108interviews using snowball sampling. In addition, comprehensive secondary data have beencollected to enrich the empirical cases with thick descriptions, and to enhance content validityas well as the reliability of the research.

    This study offers a more nuanced picture of how entrepreneurs’ characteristics influencethe international development of their firms. For example, it appears that it was neitherthe previous foreign experience, the education, nor the previously developed internationalnetwork (as suggested by previous literature) that can be credited for the rapid and vastinternationalization of the case firms. Instead, it is suggested that an entrepreneur’schildhood and prior life story directly influences their behaviour in the INV. We proposethat different types of entrepreneurs are important factors to understanding firms’ differentinternationalization patterns. Depending on the backgrounds of the entrepreneurs, theydeveloped preferences, skills, and especially desires that would come to affect the totalbehaviour of their future organizations. This study also develops the notion of psychicdistance into three separate spaces - the physical, the mental and the social space. Forexample, the context and experience during childhood creates the foundations for theentrepreneurs’ mental and social space, which can separately, but also in relation toeach other, offer a more accurate and deeper understanding of the actions taken by theentrepreneurs in the INV. Furthermore, this study has shown that the role and characteristicsof the entrepreneur do change over time, which also determines the individual’s sensitivity toopportunities and the international behaviour of the company.

    Download full text (pdf)
    ghannad-2013
  • 4.
    Ghannad, Navid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Influence of Entrepreneur’s background on the behaviour and development of Born Global´s Internationalization Processes2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much of the research on small firm internationalization has concentrated on export strategies, little attention has been paid to understand the process and conditions under which the entrepreneur identify and exploit an opportunity and subsequently creating value in the newly-borned small and medium-sized firm. As a result of the above, the new research domain of International Entrepreneurship was introduced in mid 1990s and has steadily been growing in terms of number of journals, conferences and scholars associated to this field.

     

    Still, we believe that the dynamics involved in the role of entrepreneurial manager during the internationalization process does remain in a black box. This gap has also been identified by several researchers within the field. In fact, in order to fill this gap Autio, Sapienza and Almeida (2000, p. 921) suggests: ”It would be useful to have case studies or other fine-grained approaches that can follow individual firms from inception through maturity to examine such issues as how internal and external conditions affect not only the timing of internationalization but the processes and outcomes of variations in choice”.

     

    Although we agree with Autio, Sapienza and Almeida’s quote above we do believe an expanded approach that not start with the firms inception bit also include entrepreneurs’ experiences already from childhood will further expand the understanding of firms internationalization. Previous research (e.g. Hisrich, 1990; De Vries & Florent-Treacy, 2003; Drennan, Kennedy & Renfrow, 2005) has shown that individual’s childhood do affect the mindset of the entrepreneurs and eventually reflects their outlook on life and business. Reviewing prior research in the field of International business or International entrepreneurship one gets stroked by the fact a majority of the articles focus on the interception of the company and it´s behaviour forward, without looking at the prior story of the entrepreneur. Within the field of International business there has been attempts made to correlate various variables (i.e education, prior work experience, prior international experience etc) to the speed or success (i.e turnover, amount of foreign sales, number of markets, etc) of the company.

     

    We do propose that in order to understand a company’s establishment and especially the international development and behaviour, one must look at the entrepreneur’s background as far back as possible. 

     

    Following the above discussion the aim of this article is to explore the relationship between the entrepreneur’s prior life story and the development and behaviour of their Born Global firm.

     

    Methodology

    Six years of intense qualitative field research, including 108 personal interviews, from three entrepreneurial “Born-Globals” firms are compared and contrasted with our theoretical framework in mind. Data are retrospectively, chronologically collected staring from entrepreneur’s childhood friends until today´s employees and business partners in order to gain an understanding of the individual and his role in the organizational competence development and expansion. The method of snowball technique was used in order to identify respondents and to secure the reliability in the data received.

     

    Findings

     

    This study show that earlier models and theories are not enough to understand the variation of internationalization processes that different Born global firms are carrying out. For example, none of the traditional models can explain the speed or behaviour of the Internationalization. In fact, empirical evidence do suggest that a person’s childhood and prior life story does directly influence the behaviour of the entrepreneur and thus shed some light on the irregularities in speed, market choice, and modes of entry of the Born global firm.

     

    This study provides evidence that the entrepreneur’s mental models are shaped already in child-hood and do not have to be created through earlier professional experience. Further, it is also shown, that internationalization per se is not a main objective for the entrepreneurs but a consequence of broader mental models including the entrepreneur’s view of life and view of business development. These mental models are changed over time, which also have consequences for the firm´s international development. We also showed that different types of entrepreneurs could be identified that developed their companies in different directions. A good understanding of the firm’s behavior and development could be reached by studying the entrepreneur’s background.

  • 5.
    Ghannad, Navid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The influence of the entrepreneur’s background on the behaviour and development of born globals’ internationalisation processes2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 136-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much of the research on small firm internationalisation has concentrated on export strategies, little attention has been paid to understanding the process and conditions under which the entrepreneur identifies and exploits an opportunity. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the entrepreneur's prior life story and the development and behaviour of his or her born global firm. Six years of intense qualitative field research, including 108 interviews from three entrepreneurial 'born global' firms are compared and contrasted within our theoretical framework. In this study empirical evidence suggests that a person's childhood and prior life story directly influences the behaviour of the entrepreneur. We propose that different types of entrepreneurs are important factors to understand firms' different internationalization patterns. Depending on the backgrounds of the entrepreneurs, they developed preferences, skills, and especially desires that will affect the total behaviour of their future organisations. Copyright © 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 6.
    Ghannad, Navid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The role of the entrepreneur in firm’s internationalization process2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ghannad, Navid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Ljungquist, Urban
    School of Management, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Change of entrepreneurial agenda in a core competence context: exploring the transformation from technology focus to market focus2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 148-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newest small firms - the start-ups in general and the international new ventures (INV) in particular - face major difficulties from the beginning. Not only do they need to bring competitively unique products to a new, highly competitive market, but they also must be successful in convincing customers of their products' benefits. This ultimate small firm test is in fact very similar to the criteria that define the core competence concept. Still, core competence matters have historically been delimited to large, preferably diversified companies. In this paper, we apply core competence theory and entrepreneurship theories on a small firm's empirical context. We concentrate on technology focused INVs and on the change, or transformation, these start-ups must complete in order to adopt a more market-oriented focus. Without the transformation, we argue, the small firm will not be able to expand. The purpose of the paper is to explore parts of the processes changed during the transformation and to enhance our understanding of core competence applicability on small companies. We formulate propositions, empirically guided and theoretically anchored, that describe four different components that facilitate the small firm technology-to-market transformation. Copyright © 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    Download full text (pdf)
    IJEVGhannad
  • 8.
    Kobuszewski Volles, Barbara
    et al.
    Regional University of Blumenau - FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Hoeltgebaum, Marianne
    Regional University of Blumenau - FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Odebrecht da Silva, Halissa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The COO Effect in the International Brand Positioning Strategy2016In: Future Studies Research Journal: Trends and Strategies, ISSN 2175-5825, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 200-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to develop a model in order to understand how Chinese companies strategically position their brands, considering the causes of the country of origin (COO) effect, when going through the process of internationalization.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study approach a qualitative case study that incorporates two different Chinese companies with subsidiaries settled in Brazil. It was conducted depth interviews with different components of the studied firms.

    Findings: In this way, it was developed a model that try to explain the positive and/or negative effect of general attributes from China (labor market, institution framework and education) on the brand positioning divers (value preposition, points of leverage, primary target and image reinforcement), which influences on the cost-benefit strategy approach of the brands when positioning internationally.

    Research limitations/implications: Considering that this research is a qualitative study of two Chinese companies, further qualitative and quantitative studies would be fruitful to the validity of the presented model.

    Originality/value: In order to contribute to the academic field, it was found that this research present a unique model considering different causes of the COO effect that might affect the international branding positioning.

  • 9.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    et al.
    University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    University of Växjö, Sweden.
    At the Edge of Entrepreneurial Orientation: Identifying Impediments of SME Growth (Interactive Paper)2008In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, ISSN 0740-7416, Vol. 28, no 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is often assumed to underpin firm growth and the concept is frequently scrutinized on several levels of analyses: Founder, firm, corporate setting and industry. Although many firms may find that EO is underpinning firm growth, for instance in innovation and creativity activities in multinational firms, its application most often is limited to particular departments or teams of employees. Moreover, in further inspection of the concept, it might be relevant to ask whether EO always is facilitating firm growth, or whether it under some conditions even is inhibiting growth. In large firms, the hindering probably is an isolated phenomenon in some divisions and departments. In small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), larger amplitude is expected, due to the more concentrated context, and therefore the hindrance may be devastating, in that growth of the whole firm is halted. This project focuses empirically on SMEs and theoretically on innovation processes; the latter are assumed to carry the artefacts of the limitations of EO. A firm’s core competences are likely to be applied in the processes, and therefore their inclusion is important. The existence of core competences in SMEs is a blind spot in previous research. Therefore, we adopt Prahalad & Hamel’s (1990) criteria for core competence identification and add a customer verification procedure (Ljungquist, 2007) to fit the SME context, for one reason due to the large dependency of the business environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Ljungquist, Urban
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Growth in international new ventures: facilitating and redundant components beyond start-up2015In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 103-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to identify facilitating and redundant components of core competence development during the growth of international new ventures (INVs). Through a longitudinal empirical study comparing three cases based on a large number of interviews, we describe how individual competences essential for the start-up firm (entrepreneurial, market and network) over three phases (small, youth and mature) eventually become redundant or transform into institutionalised routines. An INV built on technology competence needs to combine with market competences, preferably in parallel, for ideal market development. To expand further, the entrepreneurial competence ultimately should be reduced or omitted. To boost expansion, explicate visions and policies should be added to maintain the entrepreneurial spirit and legacy, and to guide employees. Copyright ©2015 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 11.
    Ljunquist, Urban
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Obstacles and Facilitators of Developments in Entrepreneur-driven Firms2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify facilitating and redundant components of core competence development during the growth phases in entrepreneur-driven SMEs. • Methodology: Conducts a longitudinal empirical study based on large number of interviews. • Findings: Describes how individual competences critical for a start-up firm (entrepreneurial, market and network) eventually are transformed into organisational routines and institutionalised. Highlights distinction between competence and organisational structure. The latter could emerge incrementally in a firm, yet also be a tool to manage organisational change. • Research limitations/implications: Brings in-depth knowledge by qualitative analysis. Future studies should test our findings in large-scale study with quantitative analysis. • Practical implications: A start-up built on technology competence needs to combine with market competences, preferably in parallel, or in sequence, for ideal core competence development. To expand further, the entrepreneur ultimately must step down. Important to balance the firm's ambidexterity by adding exploitation to the initial exploration. To boost expansion further, explicate visions and policies must be added, which will guide and release employees' innovative drive. • Social implications: Suggests how entrepreneurial spirits could be transformed to facilitate growth beyond small firm size. • Originality/value: Informs scholars and managers of core competence facilitators during SMEs growth phases.

  • 12.
    Pehrsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Pehrsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Abt, Tobias
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Chen, Siyuan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Erath, Fabian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Hammarstig, Tobias
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Dynamic capabilities and performance in foreign markets: Developments within international new ventures2015In: Journal of International Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1570-7385, E-ISSN 1573-7349, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 28-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the relationship between level of internationalization and performance of new ventures show conflicting results indicating a need for more in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying the relationship. This study draws on dynamic capability theory and extends the understanding of the issue. The study contributes to international entrepreneurship literature by developing a proposed model built on analyses of event histories of US operations of three Swedish international new ventures. The events take place during more than 20 years. It is proposed that the number of organizationally stable periods of the foreign unit strengthens the positive relationship between product/market knowledge transferred to the unit and its dynamic capabilities, and knowledge acquired locally by the unit and its dynamic capabilities. Also, it is proposed that dynamic capabilities aligned with the transferred and local knowledge are associated with high financial performance. Contributions to literature on international entrepreneurship are discussed. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  • 13.
    Sörensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Cawthorn, Annika
    Mid Sweden University.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Sustainable Value Creation Through Sharing and Renting – Lessons Learned from the Outdoor Industry in Sweden2023In: Proceedings of the 8th Naples Forum on Service: A service lens on business and society ; Ravello Italy, 6/9 June 2023 / [ed] Cristina Mele; Francesco Polese, 2023, p. 165-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to discuss how value can be created in new ways by sharing or renting service (e g products). This new type of businesses contributes to creating sustainable value both for the customers as well as for the environment. Today, it is no longer considered sustainable to always buy products, especially when it comes to products that will be used a few times. As a result, therefore, a sharing economy has emerged. It is both about renting out existing products against payment, but there are also examples of establishments where products are rented out free of charge. Lovelock and Gummesson (2004) addressed the non-ownership paradigm orrental paradigm almost 20 years ago but there is still lack of research in this area.

    Study design/Methodology/Approach: The study was designed as a case study where eight different cases were selected in Sweden. The cases are all business in the outdoor and tourism industry. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with the managers as well as secondary data such as home pages, social media, and written materials.

    Findings: The study show that in particular the outdoor industry and tourism the phenomen on ofrenting seems to be well established for some type of service. There are some areas that have along history of renting meanwhile other is never. The result also show that some segments of customers seem to be more openminded to renting rather than buying.

    Originality/Value: Studies on the sharing economy is still a quite new phenomenon and this study contributes to a deeper knowledge.

    Practical implications: The study could be useful for business owners that are seeking new more sustainable ways to develop their industry from traditional selling products to renting them. 

  • 14.
    Sörensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Business Development in Small Businesses During the Covid-19 Pandemic – Discovery of Opportunity or Necessity Driven?2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic has affected entrepreneurship and there are still ongoing research on how the pandemic has affected small business around the globe (Dias et al., 2021; Galindo-Martín et al., 2021). Some industries like for instance tourism and travel have taken a huge decrease in sales meanwhile entrepreneurs like for instance in digital meetings and food stores have increased their sales (Boter et al., 2021). Because of the Covid-19 pandemic,the entrepreneurial spirit has experienced tuff times. Even though Covid-19 pandemic have affected entrepreneurs in different ways such for instance new demands, attitudes and collaborations as well as adjustments to new terms there has been hard to run business during the pandemic. There has also been geographical differences as well as industry differences for the entrepreneurs (Boter et al., 2021). Entrepreneurs therefore have continued their business in different ways and have made different decisions at different moments duringcrises (Veselovska et al., 2021).

    Research in entrepreneurship is often separate necessity driven entrepreneurship from opportunity driven entrepreneurship as the main two perspectives (Reynolds, 2012; Liñán and Jaén, 2020). There is a larger debate about this difference and entrepreneurs’ motives and this difference is important to study more (Liñán and Jaén, 2020). These two perspectives are interesting to study more especially how especially how different entrepreneurs have adapted their entrepreneurship during the pandemic. The purpose of the study is to examine how small businesses have developed their businesses during the Covid-19 pandemic. What opportunities have entrepreneurs identified and applied during the Covid-19 pandemic? How have entrepreneurs adapted their business to by necessity to survive financially during the Covid-19 pandemic?

    The study was designed as a qualitative study with interview as a data collection method. The interview guide was based on previous research with a focus on the following themes; X (REF). Data was also collected from secondary data like homepages and social media. Interviews were conducted with 131 entrepreneurs, mainly from Europe and Asia. The interviews have since been themed in levels of analysis based on Gioia et al. (2013).

    The results show that there is a clear division of entrepreneurs regarding necessity driven business development while others have not been affected to the same extent have instead discovered new business opportunities during the Covid-19 pandemic. The study also shows that it is of great importance which social safety net the various countries have had where some countries have offered state support. In contrast, the entrepreneurs who run their businesses in countries where there is a complete lack of state support. For these companies, it is their own responsibility to solve problems with financing, which has often been done with the help of the family and banks. © The Authors, 2022. 

  • 15.
    Sörensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Challenge and Opportunities in International Business During the Covid-19 Pandemic – a Comparative Study Between European and Asian Entrepreneurs2022In: Paper presented at the CIMaR 29th Annual Conference, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Sörensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden; Inland School of Business and Social Sciences, Rena, Norway.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Entrepreneurial opportunities and difficulties under COVID-19 for women entrepreneurs in Asia and Europe2024In: Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, ISSN 2053-4604, E-ISSN 2053-4612, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 119-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore and gain a greater understanding of women's entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 pandemic. How have women entrepreneurs changed their entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 pandemic? What dimensions are highlighted by women entrepreneurs for a sustainable entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 pandemic?

    Design/methodology/approach: This study was conducted with a qualitative design where multiple case studies were conducted with 30 women. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with the women entrepreneurs in Asia and Europe.

    Findings: The results from this study show that women entrepreneurs have mainly focused on financial resources. Economic sustainability is required for companies to survive a crisis in the form of a pandemic. This study has shown what lessons women have from the pandemic where the four D’s model constitute a first step to a theoretical contribution. For women, it is about dollars (e g economic sustainability), demand from customers, the role that digitization has played and distribution both to customers and from suppliers.

    Practical implications: Practical implications from this study are that women entrepreneurs need to be prepared for economic crises to a larger extent. The economic sustainability plays a key role in sustainable businesses for women entrepreneurs in any kind of context

    Social implications: Women's entrepreneurship looks different, and more knowledge is needed about their conditions. It contributes to increased social sustainability.

    Originality/value: This study contributes to an increased understanding of how women's entrepreneurship has been affected during a global crisis. © 2023, Anna Sörensson and Navid Ghannad.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Sörensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Ghannad, Navid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Sustainable Businesses by Women Entrepreneurs during the Covid-19 pandemic - a Comparative Study between Europe and Asia2022In: The 9th International Conference on Social Responsibility, Ethics and Sustainable Business / [ed] Anna Sörensson; Georgiana Grigori; Anders Lundström; Alin Stancu; Besrat Tesfaye; Maria Bogren, Bucharest: ASE , 2022, Vol. 9, p. 55-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to explore and gain a greater understanding of women's entrepreneurship during the Covid-19 pandemic. How have women entrepreneurship changed their entrepreneurship during the Covid-19 pandemic? What dimensions are highlighted by women entrepreneurs for a sustainable entrepreneurship during the Covid-1.9 pandemic? The study was conducted with a qualitative design where multiple case studies were conducted with 30 women. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with the women entrepreneurs in Europe and Asia. The results from the study show that female entrepreneurs have mainly focused on financial resources. Economic sustainability is required for companies to survive a crisis in the form of a pandemic. The study has shown what lessons women have from the pandemic where the four Ds constitute a first step to a theoretical contribution, For women, it is about dollars (e g economic sustainability), demand from customers, the role that digitization has played and distribution both to customers but also from suppliers. © The Authors, 2022. 

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf