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  • 1.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Disaster Tourists, Smartphone Bystanders, Mediated Witnesses or Citizen Journalists? Bystander Theories and Mobile Media Practices at Accident Sites2016In: ECREA 2016 Abstact Book: Mediating (Dis)Continuities: Contesting Pasts, Presents and Futures., Prague: Czech-In , 2016, p. 176-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the phenomenon of bystanders who use their smartphones to film or take photographs at accident scenes, instead of offering their help to people in need or to assist medical units. This phenomenon has been extensively discussed in Swedish news media in recent years, since it has been described as a growing problem for rescue workers, like paramedics, police and fire fighters.

    Some of the early literature in social psychology explained bystander inaction by indifference, but in the late 1960’s, the American researchers Darley and Latane showed that bystander inaction could be explained as an effect of the size of the bystander crowd. With an increase of the number of the bystanders, the chances of their involvement to help decreased.

    The past decade has seen an growing scholarly interest in “media witnessing”, both in terms of witnessing from a distance through mass media, as discussed by Peters, and “citizen camera-witnessing”, a term popularised by the works of Allan and Andrén-Papadopoulos. This literature recognizes the complexity of concepts such as active/passive and proximity/distance when it comes to media witnessing in the digital era.

    Drawn from previous research and theories, the aim of this paper is to discuss how bystander theory can be further developed to include the action of mobile media practices at scenes like accidents. From this perspective, the paper also draws attention to what could be a part of a mediated cultural trauma found in contemporary society and thereby connects to the theme of the conference.

    The paper identifies four categories in the literature that are relevant for further research into the phenomenon and to be connected to the framework of bystander theories. These categories are: “disaster tourism”, “citizen (photo) journalism”, “media witnessing”, and “digital media ethics”.

    The paper ends with a discussion about possible theoretical approaches to further empirical studies on contemporary bystander phenomena.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Mobile bystanders and rubbernecks, disaster tourists, and helpers. Towards a theoretical framework for critically studying action possibilities at accident sites2021In: Mobile Media & Communication, ISSN 2050-1579, E-ISSN 2050-1587, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 531-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the phenomenon of mobile bystanders who use their smartphones to film or take photographs at accident scenes, instead of offering their help to people in need or to assist medical units. This phenomenon has been extensively discussed in Swedish news media in recent years since it has been described as a growing problem for first responders, such as paramedics, police, and firefighters. This article aims to identify theoretical perspectives that are relevant for analyzing mobile media practices and discuss the ethical implications of these perspectives. Our purpose is twofold: we want to develop a theoretical framework for critically approaching mobile media practices, and we want to contribute to discussions concerning well-being in a time marked by mediatization and digitalization. In this pursuit, we combine theory from social psychology about how people behave at traumatic scenes with discussions about witnessing in and through media, as developed in media and communication studies. Both perspectives offer various implications for normative inquiry, and in our discussion, we argue that mobile bystanders must be considered simultaneously as transgressors of social norms and as emphatic witnesses behaving in accordance with the digital media age. The article ends with a discussion regarding the implications for further research. © The Author(s) 2021.

  • 3.
    De Cock, Rozane
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mertens, Stefan
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lams, Lut
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mistiaen, Valeriane
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Joris, Willem
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    d'Haenens, Leen
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Refugees in the News: Comparing Belgian and Swedish Newspaper Coverage of the European Refugee Situation during Summer 20152018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative content analysis of Belgian and Swedish newspaper coverage of the 'refugee situation' in 2015 (N=898) revolves around responsibility indicators, news actor characteristics, and thematic emphasis. As they are a potential influential factor in the public-opinion formation process, the studying of media portrayals is an essential first step in investigating the dynamic interplay between media discourse and societal reactions. Belgium and Sweden differ with respect to migration policy, integration indicators, and the number of incoming refugees. They also differ in terms of journalistic cultural values. As a result, they make for an excellent case study of intercultural differences and similarities in how refugees are reported on. Our analysis made clear that Belgian news coverage shows regional diversity, with Francophone Belgian journalists showing more tolerance towards migrants and thus tending to be more in line with their Swedish counterparts. Still, refugees are seldom allowed to speak for themselves. This warrants attention and action by news professionals. © 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston.

  • 4.
    De Cock, Rozane
    et al.
    Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mertens, Stefan
    Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lams, Lutgard
    Faculty of Arts, Brussels Campus, KU Leuven, Brussels, Belgium.
    Mistianen, Valeriane
    Centre de Recherche en Information et Communication, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Joris, Willem
    Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    d'Haenens, Leen
    Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Refugees in the news: Comparing Belgian and Swedish newspaper coverage of the European refugee situation during summer 20152018In: Communications: the European Journal of Communication Research, ISSN 0341-2059, E-ISSN 1613-4087, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 301-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative content analysis of Belgian and Swedish newspaper coverage of the ‘refugee situation’ in 2015 (N=898) revolves around responsibility indicators, news actor characteristics, and thematic emphasis. As they are a potential influential factor in the public-opinion formation process, the studying of media portrayals is an essential first step in investigating the dynamic interplay between media discourse and societal reactions. Belgium and Sweden differ with respect to migration policy, integration indicators, and the number of incoming refugees. They also differ in terms of journalistic cultural values. As a result, they make for an excellent case study of intercultural differences and similarities in how refugees are reported on. Our analysis made clear that Belgian news coverage shows regional diversity, with Francophone Belgian journalists showing more tolerance towards migrants and thus tending to be more in line with their Swedish counterparts. Still, refugees are seldom allowed to speak for themselves. This warrants attention and action by news professionals. © 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

  • 5.
    De Cock, Rozane
    et al.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mistiaen, Valérianen
    Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    The Refugee Situation as Portrayed in News Media: A Content Analysis of Belgian and Swedish Newspapers - 2015-20172019In: Images of Immigrants and Refugees in Western Europe: Media Representations, Public Opinion and Refugees' Experiences / [ed] Leen d´Haenens, Willem Joris & Francois Heinderyckx, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, p. 39-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gillen, Julia
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Matsumoto, Mitsuko
    Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A Day in the Digital Lives of Children Aged 0-3: England, Spain and Sweden2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Joris, Willem
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    De Cock, Rozane
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    De Coninck, David
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Heinderyckx, Francois
    Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Matthys, Koen
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mazzochetti, Jacinthe
    Université catholique de Lovain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
    Mertens, Stefan
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Smets, Kevin
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    d´Haenens, Leen
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    IM2MEDIATE: Image of Immigrants in Media: Thought-provoking Effects: Final Report2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of migration has become particularly contentious in national as well as international debates. Media have a discernable impact on overall societal attitudes towards this phenomenon. Polls show time and again that immigration is one of the main issues occupying people’s minds. IM2MEDIATE (Images of Immigrants in the Media: Thought-provoking) examines the dynamic interplay between media representations of immigrants and refugees on the one hand, and the governmental and societal (re)actions to these on the other hand. Largely focusing on Belgium and Sweden, our interdisciplinary research attempts to unravel the determinants of people’s preferences regarding migration policy, expectations towards immigrants, and economic, humanitarian and cultural concerns about immigration’s effect on the life of the majority population. Whilst immigrants and refugees remain voiceless and highly underrepresented in the legacy media, IM2MEDIATE allows their voices to be heard.

  • 8.
    Joris, Willem
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    De Cock, Rozane
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mertens, Stefan
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mistiaen, Valériane
    Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lams, Lutgard
    KU leuven Campus Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    d'Haenens, Leen
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Vluchtelingen in het nieuws: Een vergelijkende analyse van de berichtgeving in België en Zweden2018In: Vlaams tijdschrift voor overheidsmanagement, ISSN 1373-0509, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Joris, Willem
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    d'Haenens, Leen
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    de Cock, Rozane
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Lams, Lut
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mertens, Stefan
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Refugees in the News: Content Analysis of Belgian and Swedish Media News2017In: Migration and Communication Flows: Rethinking borders, conflict and identity through the digital, 2017, p. 36-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As previous research showed a significant effect of news coverage about the migration issue on the public opinion, it is recommended to investigate how the refugees are portrayed in the news. Our content analysis of Belgian and Swedish newspapers, television news and online news before and after a carefully selected set of key moments between 2015 and 2017 includes responsibility indicators and suggested solution items, the gender structure of news items and news actors, collective actors versus individual actors, and the religious and national identity of the actors covered. Comparisons between the representations of blame attribution, demography, geographic identities, religious identities and degrees of individuation will be compared with real world indicators (such as statistics about the population of refugees and its composition in different subgroups and the evolution of these statistics).

  • 10.
    Kondo, Kaoruko
    et al.
    University of Westminister, London, United Kingdom.
    Evangelina, Kourti
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Watanabe Sakata, Kuniko
    Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Children's Rights to Information: The responsibility of public service media during the COVID-19 pandemic2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kourti, Evangelina
    et al.
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Kondo, Kaoruko
    University of Westminister, London, United Kingdom.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Watanabe Sakata, Kuniko
    Tohuko University, Tohuko, Japan.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    [Children's rights to information: The responsibility of public service media during the COVID-19 pandemic]2021In: Η επικοινωνιακή κατασκευή μιας πανδημίας: Ο SARS-CoV-2, τα Μέσα & κΟινωνια: [The Communicative Construction of a Pandemic: SARS-CoV-2, Media & Society] / [ed] G. Pleios, A. Skamnakis, S. Theoharadis, Athens: Papazisis Editions , 2021, p. 183-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Mertens, Stefan
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    De Cock, Rozane
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mistiaen, Valériane
    Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Helmersson, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Reporting with Human Dignity: Journalistic Strategies and Difficulties Encountered by Belgian and Swedish journalists Covering the Refugee Situation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Poveda, David
    et al.
    Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Matsumoto, Mitsuko
    Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandberg, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Aliagas, Cristina
    Universitat Auto`noma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gillen, Julia
    University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK.
    Space and practices: Engagement of children under 3 with tablets and televisions in homes in Spain, Sweden and England2020In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, ISSN 1468-7984, E-ISSN 1741-2919, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 500-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young children’s engagements with digital technologies form part of their emergent everyday literacy practices. The study reported here derives from the pan-European study ‘A Day in the Digital Lives of Children aged 0-3’. The methodology was centred on the videoing of an entire day’s experiences of a child aged under 3, together with a reflective interview with the parents and inventories related to digital access, skills and activities of the child. In this paper, we look at three children in Spain, Sweden and England, respectively. We examine our data through three prisms. (1) Spatio-temporal: We consider the children’s engagements in terms of their appropriation of space, in relationships with others in the home and the intimate geographies of young children’s digital literacies. (2) Parental discourse: We use the tensions and contradictions for families framework to examine the selection and monitoring of digital literacies. (3) Practice: Drawing on the first two prisms, we zoom into how children engage with tablet devices and television. Our research demonstrates richness, diversity and agency in these young children’s practices with technologies. We propose the concept of living-room assemblage as an analytical metaphor to understand the macrohabitats of young children’s digital literacies and practices, which emerge as multi-layered, creative and co-occurring with other family activities.Our analysis also explores the challenges presented to parents and the ways in which they navigate tensions and contradictions in their media and digital environments, which are condensed in family practices and discourses around tablets and television. © The Author(s) 2020.

  • 14.
    Puschmann, Paul
    et al.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    De Coninck, David
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    d´Haenens, Leen
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Migration and intergration policy in Europe: Comparing Belgium and Sweden2019In: Images of Immigrants and Refugees in Western Europe: Media Representations, Public Opinion and Refugee's Experiences / [ed] Leen d´Haenens, Willem Joris & Francois Heinderyckx, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, p. 21-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sandberg, Helena
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Moral Struggles and Family Negotiations in 0-3-year olds' digital media uses2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Sandberg, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Negotiating and Resisting Digital Media in Young Children's Everyday Life: An ethnographic study2019In: Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age: A Question of Democracy / [ed] Ulla Carlsson, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg, 2019, p. 119-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While the dominating societal discourse highlights the positive aspects of digitalization of childhood, families with young children may perceive things differently, even demonstrating various forms of resistance to children’s media practices and use of digital technology. It is within the domestic sphere that young children are introduced to digital media, but still policymakers and scholars have paid little attention to these issues. In this chapter, preliminary Swedish findings from a European comparative study on 0- to 3-year-olds and their digital life are presented and discussed in relation to domestication and parental mediation of media.

  • 17.
    Sandberg, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Communication and Media, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Toddlers' digital media practices and everyday parental struggles: Interactions and meaning-making as digital media are domesticated2021In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 42, no s4, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the Swedish findings from a European comparative study on 0-3-year-old children and their digital lives are presented and discussed in relation to domestication theory, including the concept of moral economy. More specifically, attention is paid to toddler's appropriation of digital technology and the parents' moral struggles: the negotiations between the parents concerning the introduction of digital media practices in early childhood, the selection of content, and the monitoring of children. Parents of very young children have ambivalent feelings towards digital media technologies and struggle to make the right decision for their children. The study demonstrates that the domestication of digital technology in early childhood is far more multifaceted and troublesome for parents to handle than previous research has found. © 2021 Helena Sandberg et al., published by Sciendo 2021.

  • 18.
    Sandberg, Helena
    et al.
    Lunds University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    When ethnographic work turns into distant screen visits: A note on flexible inflexibility during the COVID-19 pandemic2022In: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, ISSN 1463-9491, E-ISSN 1463-9491, Vol. 23, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This colloquium shares experiences from doing ethnographic fieldwork with young children and the challenges that followed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The project DIGIKIDS Sweden has its focus on very young children (birth to three years) and their engagement with digital media technologies in their homes. The pandemic put the project on hold, but in the families where the fieldwork had already started, the authors decided to change the methods of data collection. Digital screen visits were introduced and, at first, this seemed to be flexible, and they adjusted to the new environment. At the same time, this flexibility also became an inflexible experience due to the use of technology. © The Author(s) 2022.

  • 19.
    Sjöberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Sandberg, Helena
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Studying young children's digital literacy in their home settings2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    News-savvy Kids and the Sustainability of Journalism2017In: What is Sustainable Journalism?: Integrating the Environmental, Social, and Economic Challenges of Journalism / [ed] Peter Berglez, Ulrika Olausson & Mart Ots, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 151-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sundin, Ebba
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallén, Malin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Local Images of Health and Lifestyle: Free Newspapers, Community-construction and the “Healthy City”2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local free newspapers and magazines have become an integrated part of urban life. They are no longer restricted to large cities and in an age of declining readership in traditional press, these publications are sometimes the only outlet that reaches the general population. This makes them interesting both in terms of media economy (the hyper-local as the only viable business model for print journalism), and in terms of the construction of community. Still, they are often an overlooked phenomenon in media and communication studies.

    This paper takes its departure from the project “Healthy Cities”, a movement developed by WHO with the purpose to include health-related issues in the political, economic and social agenda. In this movement, WHO acknowledges media’s role for promoting health images from a local perspective. The paper will contribute to the research field of local media’s role for their audiences in terms of shaping ideas of being part of ”the good life”. From this perspective, media have an important function in individuals’ sense of belonging and well-being.

    In recent years, the local media landscape in Sweden has changed. The mainstream journalism has been somewhat reduced, due to financial cutbacks. In the same time, there is a new pattern of free local newspapers and magazines, distributed within communities, and with clear ambitions to promote “the good life” within the geographical range of distribution. Since changes of mainstream media have weakened the traditional concept of media closeness, it is of importance to study the new and innovative media paths to connect individuals within communities (e.g. smaller towns) in order to understand how these work for individuals’ sense of belonging and especially related to issues of health, lifestyles and well-being.

    In this paper we would like to take the opportunity to share the outlines for a research project on local free-of-charge media in the Swedish town Halmstad, that is one of the 1400 European town and city members in the “Healthy City” project.

     We present some preliminary findings from four newspapers and magazines that are giving much attention to promote the image of “the good life” through articles about health, lifestyles and well-being.

     The research project is part of an initiative to chart contemporary urban town living through an interdisciplinary research program that uses a community studies approach, where the aim of the present study is to understand the role that the free newspapers (and similar media outlets) play in representing and making sense of notions such as “health”, “lifestyle” and ”well-being” in Halmstad.

  • 22.
    Sundin, Ebba
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    De Cock, Rozane
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Mistiaen, Valériane
    Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Constructive Journalism and TV Reporting on Refugees in Sweden and Belgium (2015-2017)2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sustainability of journalism has been questioned from various directions during the last decade: individualized news instead of public interest, algorithm news, changes on the markets challenging the independence of news producers etc. In addition, Schofield Clark and Marchi (2017) show that young people are by-passing traditional news in the way they share news with each other. Audiences as minority groups and youngsters often feel misrepresented by mainstream news media, turn to alternative sources or lose their interest in news. 

    Four years after the first dissertation on constructive journalism (McIntyre, 2015), we propose a paper aiming to discuss how constructive journalism (CJ) approaches can be operationalized in tv news studies and how they appear in daily news reporting on serious and often negatively framed topics. Precisely the focus of CJ (Gyldensted, 2011; McIntyre, 2015) on possible solutions and alternatives for the problems touched upon in the news and progress or lessons learned for the future could function as clear answers to the complaints of news avoidance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first international comparative study focusing on tv news reporting on refugees and elements of CJ. 

    We collected and quantitatively analyzed a sample of 1682 tv news items during eleven key moment periods between 2015-2017 stemming from Sweden (SVT as PBS and TV4 as commercial channel) and Belgium (the Dutch speaking part Flanders: VRT and VTM; and the French speaking part: RTBF and RTL). The codebook was tested beforehand by three researchers and adapted several times until good coder reliability was achieved. 

    Although the majority of the news items (69%) in our sample does not contain CJ aspects, one third does contain at least one constructive element (31%). In the analysis we differentiated between “items that mention possible solutions, alternatives or improvements for the problems touched upon” and “items that mention progress or lessons learned concerning the topic”. Contrary to our expectations, the Belgian journalists promoted more of a solution-based reporting than their Swedish colleagues. In 27,1% of the news items, the Belgian tv reporters mentioned a CJ aspect and in 10,8% of the items they explicitly mentioned two whereas Swedish journalists did so in respectively 16,9% and 2,7% of the items on refugees (X2= 56,96; df=2; p< .001). For a heavy news topic as the refugee situation, we conclude that mentioning solution-driven elements in between 20 and 38% of the total appearing news items is a clear indication of the expanding idea of CJ in tv reporting. 

  • 23.
    Sundin, Ebba
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Hallén, Malin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    COVID-19 App Trackers and the news media in a Nordic perspective2021In: Responding to a Disrupted World: New Narratives and Mediated Realities / [ed] Enric Ordeix; Judit Agràs, Barcelona: Facultat de Comunicació i Relacions Internacionals Blanquerna , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 24.
    Sundin, Ebba
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stenberg, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyman, Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Using Sensitive Visual Data: Interdisciplinary Approaches for Developing New Ethically Informed Methodologies2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's digitized society, some phenomena need to be addressed in research in order to build knowledge and understanding that can be used to maintain integrity and safety for individuals. In this paper, we address the problematic issue of smartphone bystanders in accident scenes. Photographs and videos of victims in difficult circumstances, often with no possibilities to claim their own integrity, are widely posted on social media - and the phenomenon seems to be spread in many cultures. Photographs and videos become communicative "data" in content analysis of social media platforms, but what do researchers need to be aware of in analyzing and reporting research findings in this particular area? We believe that interdisciplinary approaches are useful when it comes to exploring and developing ethically informed methodologies in order to safeguard researchers working with sensitive data drawn from social media and the Internet in areas of social complexity.

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