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  • 1.
    Davidsson, Eva
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Anders
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Approaching classroom dialogues – Using spy glasses for data collection2015In: Conference proceedings. HICE 2015, 13th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, 2015, p. 1035-1034Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies within educational research seek to investigate students’ dialogues for studying learning situations. One difficulty is however to approach students’ discussions in action. In this paper we discuss the possibilities of using spy glasses in order to capture both students’ talk and their actions in the science classroom. This methodological approach makes it possible to come close to all students’ actions when working in small groups or doing laboratory work. This means that the spy glasses register their discussions with each other but also what they are doing with the laboratory equipment, what they write or what they focus on in a written text. This methodological approach provides a very rich data material and many hours of recordings for one single lesson. In order to approach the comprehensive data material we suggest clear analytic foci and iterated analytic phases. The preliminary results show that spy glasses can be an important analytic tool for capturing student dialogues and studying learning situations in the classroom.

  • 2.
    Gomez, Maria
    et al.
    School of Science Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    School of Science Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Science Teachers’ Assessment and Grading Practices in Swedish Upper Secondary Schools2015In: Journal of Education and Training, ISSN 2330-9709, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines science teachers’ assessment and grading practices as well as studentparticipation in the assessment process in the upper secondary school. The teachers wereasked about how and when they assess students and what was crucial when grading students.We asked when they considered students to have developed the following knowledge criteria:aptitude for critical thinking, analytical and practical skills and how they assessed studentsregarding these skills. We report overall evidence-based assessment practices from theteachers’ comments in face-to-face interviews. Teachers’ comments are closely aligned andassociated with long-established beliefs. The assessment and grading practices were found tobe at odds with modern perspectives of assessment as well as its role in learning.

  • 3.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Davidsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Relating trends in large-scale science studies to how teaching and learning are constituted in different school environments in Sweden2015In: Conference proceedings. HICE 2015, 13th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, 2015, p. 1031-1032Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an interest in increasing the understanding of trends regarding Swedish students ́ knowledge in science by exploring the relation between results of large-scale studies (PISA and TIMSS) and how science teaching and learning are constituted in different school environments. Previous large scale studies point to an explicit downward trend in Swedish students ́ performances in science over the last decade. Our analyses indicate that a reinforced knowledge segregation of Swedish schools and declining results among low- and mid-ranged performers explains a main part of the trend. In this paper we analyze how this trend could be related to and visible in different activities in a science classroom perspective in Sweden today. This means to analyze the use of language and science classroom discourse, in theoretical and practical parts of the classroom activities. In addition, it involves exploring different school areas which have either a large proportions of high achievers or low performers or areas that experienced a substantial improvement or decline during this period. The purpose is to analyze the empirical material which comprises examples of teaching and learning sequences, in a selection of these different schools areas. Our expectations are to increase the understanding of how national trends from large-scale studies are constituted and become explicit, distinguish success and decline factors and identify suggestions of practical action programs for science teaching.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Annika
    et al.
    Faculty for Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nygård Larsson, Pia
    Faculty for Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Faculty for Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Multilingual students’ use of translanguaging in science classrooms2019In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 41, no 15, p. 2049-2069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes multilingual students’ authentic use of their first and second languages in a translanguaging science classroom, from a sociocultural perspective. The study is ethnographic, and has followed some lessons each month in a translanguaging science classroom at a primary school for three years. The observed lessons were documented by four video cameras and four audio recorders, while field notes and different types of students’ texts and other teaching materials were also collected. In order investigate how language operates, and to realise the meaning semantically, we analysed the student’ use of both first and second language to tie paradigmatic relations, and how they move in linguistic loops between languages and discourses. The results illustrate the ways in which a translanguaging science classroom constitutes a resource in joint negotiations of the scientific content and its related language for multilingual students, and benefits the students’ ability to relate and contextualise the science content to prior experience. The creation of translanguaging science classrooms, in which students’ experiences and diverse cultural and linguistic resources interweave with school science, and in which multilingual students are enabled and encouraged to use all available language resources, has important implications for science education. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Annika
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Nygård-Larsson, Pia
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Flerspråkighet som en resurs i NO-klassrummet2016In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 30-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie avser att bidra till att öka kunskapen om språkets betydelse för lärande genom att analysera språkanvändning i autentiska situationer i naturorienterande undervisning i ett flerspråkigt klassrum på mellanstadiet. Studien beskriver hur nyanlända elever använder sina språkliga resurser genom att kodväxla mellan första- och andraspråk i växelverkan mellan en vardaglig diskurs och mer vetenskapliga diskurser som elever möter i undervisningssammanhang. Elevernas språkliga rörelse mellan och inom de olika diskurserna analyseras genom att tydliggöra de samtal eleverna för i kommunikativa undervisningssituationer. Resultatet pekar på att elevernas användning av kodväxling som en resurs i undervisningen ökar deras diskursiva rörlighet vilket i sin tur kan ha en avgörande betydelse för deras språkutveckling och lärande inom ämnesområdet.

  • 6.
    Nygård Larsson, Pia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Semantiska vågor – elevers diskursiva rörlighet i gruppsamtal2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to use and understand a scientific language students need the ability to move between everyday and scientific discourses. This article analyses exploratory talks, and use of language when students collaboratively discuss a science assignment. The aim is to develop an analytical tool that can facilitate understanding and visualization of students' language use. The concepts of discursive mobility (Nygård Larsson, 2011) and semantic waves (Martin, 2013; Maton, 2013) constitute the starting point in the analysis and the students’ discussions are explored by using the concepts of semantic gravity and semantic density. The results display that all of the students’ conversations contain a certain degree of discursive mobility. However, there exists differences in how the conversations move between everyday and scientific languages and in terms of how successful the students are to formulate a specific subject language. In some conversations, everyday expressions become a productive resource and a bridge to a more scientific language.

  • 7.
    Serder, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Language Games and Meaning as Used in Student Encounters With Scientific Literacy Test Items2016In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 321-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in science education has suggested that difficulties among students learning science relate to challenges in framing its discourse. This article examines the role that language plays in a scientific literacy test for which everyday life is an augmented aspect. Video-recorded data was collected in four ninth-grade science classes in a Swedish compulsory school as small groups of students discussed and collaboratively solved Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) science test items. The theoretical framework assumes sociocultural perspectives as well as that of Wittgenstein's later works on language. The study involves an analysis of students’ meaning making of specific words that occur in the test and the various language games to which these words contribute. Specifically, we analyzed the students’ use of four different words: reference, constant, pattern, and factor. We found that the students use these words in everyday or mathematical language games; for example, understanding the word “pattern” as a mathematical regularity rather than a result of a scientific experiment. The results were analyzed in relation to the specific illustrations and wording that contextualize the items. We argue that a crucial part of being scientifically literate is privileging science content over other possible disciplines and contexts and ignoring the everyday perspective. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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