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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Cristian
    et al.
    Klågerupskolan, Svedala, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Content, interest and the role of engagement: experienced science teachers discuss2023In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 58, no 6, article id 065011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do science teachers perceive student engagement and its importance for teaching and what strategies do they use to create it? When 21 experienced science teachers in 4 focus groups discussed these questions, they brought up behavioural aspects, but also less visible emotional and cognitive aspects, as well as reciprocal aspects of teacher and student engagement. One teacher described engagement as 'the oil in the machinery' during lessons. Which role does the curricular content play? Well aware that some topics are seen as more directly interesting by students, teachers connect to these, but also use hooks, including lively demonstrations, role play and connections to the outside world. In this way, they aim to generate situational interest and engagement also in topics that are often viewed as less interesting, including atoms and molecules. These experienced teachers describe how they adapt their teaching to the group also in real time, based on the degree of engagement exhibited by the students. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Cristian
    et al.
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    En Delfistudie om lärares uppfattning av elevengagemang i NO-undervisningen2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 128-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens in a science classroom where students are engaged and how do teachers observe and interpret student engagement? This article highlights teachers’ perspective on students’ engagement in science education and to what extent it is connected to the scientific content. This approach complements earlier research which focuses mostly on students’ attitude towards science education and their interest in various topics in science.

    The findings are based on a three-stage Delphi survey distributed to 39 expert science teachers. The results shows science education with a range of different perspectives and that most teachers do not perceive any direct connection between specific science topics and the students’ engagement. The survey also shows that teachers to a high level interpret students’ emotional expressions and academic behavior as engagement rather than their cognitive behavior.

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  • 3.
    Atkinson, Lucy
    et al.
    University of York, York, UK.
    Dunlop, Lynda
    University of York, York, UK.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Turkenburg-van Diepen, Maria
    University of York, York, UK.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    The Environment and Political Participation in Science Education2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing attention to the role of education in teaching environmental issues such as climate change (Teach the Future, n.d.). Whilst environmental issues are science-dependent, science is not sufficient to respond to today’s environmental challenges. Yet internationally, science and geography are those subjects most likely to include environmental content (UNESCO, 2021). In England, students can expect to learn about environmental challenges including climate change, biodiversity and pollution during their compulsory science education (DfE, 2013). These topics are often controversial, rife with moral tensions (Zeidler, Herman, & Sadler, 2019), and characterised by both descriptive facts and normative values. The values often deal with solutions to the problems, what kind of actions can be taken on an individual or societal level and even what kind of society is preferred. This makes the issues both scientific and political. Yet little is known about how politics enters the science classroom. In this study, we aim to understand how environmental politics enters the classroom, and how science teachers address different approaches to political participation with their students.

    In order to develop democratic environmental governance, there is a need for representation of different groups of people, opportunities for participation and for spaces for deliberation (Lidskog & Elander, 2007), i.e. for politics. Schools are potential sites for participation and deliberation and for learning democracy (Biesta & Lawy, 2006). Politics can be defined in different ways, from a narrow focus on electoral processes to broader conceptualisations which include different ways of making decisions and shaping power relations. In this study, we are concerned with power and social change (Dahl & Stinebrickner, 2003) i.e. “the capacity for agency and deliberation in situations of genuine collective or social choice” (Hay, 2007, p. 77) through science education. This definition of politics goes beyond electoral and party politics and includes activities outside formal political institutions. This is in accordance with Heywood (1999)’s characterisation of politics as an a social activity that arises out of interaction between or among people, which develops out of diversity (the existence of different interests, wants, needs and goals), and which relates to collective decisions which are regarded as binding upon a group of people. Carter (2018) identifies the environment as a policy problem for several reasons, including that the environment can be considered a public good, with complex and interdependent relationships between people and ecosystems acting across national borders with consequences felt into the future.

    This characterisation of politics is relevant to the study context as education is a social activity which brings together people with different views, interests and goals in relation to the environment, and it is a context in which collective decisions can be made, for example, about how the school function, what is taught (and how), and what actions or outcomes are desirable as a result of education. Not all of these actions and outcomes can be considered political and we see politics as related to societal engagement and political participation more broadly. Ekman and Amnå (2012) have developed a typology of different forms of participation in society. They distinguish between (a) non-participation (disengagement); (b) civic participation (latent political), whether social involvement or civic engagement; and (c) political participation (manifest political), which can be formal political participation or activism. Each of these three types of participation are further classified in terms of individual and collective forms. In this study, we use Ekman and Amnå’s (2012) typology to understand the ways in which teachers address the political dimensions of the environment in school science. The research question we set out to explore in the study is: how do science teachers address political participation in science education?

    Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources UsedAn exploratory qualitative approach was used to understand science teachers’ perceptions and approaches to environmental politics. We focused on science teachers with responsibility for teaching students aged 11-16 in England because we were interested in what students experience during their compulsory secondary science education, where the curriculum demands that they learn about ecosystems and the environment.

    A deductive approach to instrument design was used, drawing on Ekman and Amnå’s (2012) typology of latent and manifest political participation and non-participation (see Table 1 above) in the design of the interview guide and in the analysis of data to understand the ways in which politics enters the science classroom. Given the potentially sensitive nature of some of the questions, we used one-to-one interviews, conducted online to increase the geographical reach, and minimise the need for travel.  The interview guide contained open-ended questions on science teachers’ perspectives on and experiences of teaching environmental politics in science education.  We deliberately did not ask about educational policy; only about teachers’ own experiences, practices, personal perspectives and barriers they encountered.  

    Participants were provided with an infographic using examples from Ekman and Amnå’s (2012) typology and asked to mark ways of participating in society which they had:planned and taught (green); mentioned in passing or in response to a question from a student (orange); and, never addressed (red).  The interview focused on reasons for these decisions.  Interviews were conducted by three members of the research team and took place in January - June 2022. Each lasted approximately 1 hour.

    Interviews with 11 teachers were recorded and transcribed and interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) (Smith, 2004) used to analyse the data.  This approach aims not at generalisation but rather to understand how individuals make sense of their own experiences (Guihen, 2019), namely, how politics enters the science classroom.  IPA is typically used to generate meaningful insights from a small dataset, often in psychology and health sciences.  It is appropriate here because it provides a way to understand how participants make sense of their social world, it allows for diversity of perceptions rather than looking for a single objective truth and it allows researchers to interpret these experiences and understand the perspective of an insider and then interpret what it means for them to have this perspective (Reid, Flowers, & Larkin, 2005). An iterative approach to data analysis was used, with reflexive discussions between each stage of analysis.  

    Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or FindingsTeachers participating in this study saw a place for politics in science education.  However, it  was described as almost absent in lessons. Teachers were more likely to discuss individual, legal, forms of participation, focusing on civil (latent political) actions rather than collective, manifest forms of participating. Even when politics enters the classroom, it tends to be students rather than teachers who introduce the topic, unless there are links to the curriculum or other legal and political frameworks. Policy (national and school) and colleague and student perceptions prevented teachers from planning to discuss manifest forms of political participation with students.  

    Politics (especially collective aspects) are experienced as off-limits to teachers in the study. This post-political logic distances people (here, young people but also teachers) from involvement in decision-making and reduces their capacity to be involved in environmental decision-making now and in the future.  These absences, we argue, contribute to a broader societal trend which closes off spaces to discuss and celebrate disagreement (Blühdorn & Deflorian, 2021), and which diminish the potential for young people to learn democracy. In order to develop democratic governance of environmental issues, there is a need for representation, opportunities for participation and for spaces for deliberation (Liskog & Elander, 2007).  Schools are in many ways ideal sites to encourage political participation as they are shared spaces of learning - both about forms of participation but also how to participate and to deliberate across disagreement, or as one of the teachers in this study put it ‘we need to teach them how to use their voice properly and how to be heard’. This requires those who are in positions where they can act to listen to these voices and engage in deliberation and bring politics - as the capacity to deliberate and make collective decisions - into the science classroom.

  • 4.
    Byrne, Jenny
    et al.
    Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Ideland, Malin
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Grace, Marcus
    Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Climate Change and Everyday Life: Repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue2014In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1491-1509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students' engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 5.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hela skolan för hållbar utveckling2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här delen avslutar modulen samtidigt som den blickar framåt mot arbetslagets och skolans utveckling. Syftet med delen är att bidra till hur skolans personal kan arbeta med att utveckla en skola som har som mål att i verksamheten som helhet arbeta med hållbarhet.

    I delen presenteras en modell för hur en skola kan arbeta med skolutveckling som en demokratisk process. Delen diskuterar Framtidsverkstad, som är en metod för att starta en förändringsprocess. Den visar ett exempel från en skola och hur ett arbetslag genomför en framtidsverkstad. Ni får även möjlighet att pröva att genomföra en framtidsverkstad på den egna skolan. Delen tar också upp idéer om organisationsförändring.

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    Hela skolan för hållbar utveckling
  • 6.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Didaktiska perspektiv på hållbar utveckling2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet ger en introduktion till lärande i hållbar utveckling. Det görs genom att ge en bild av hur de komplexa och ämnesövergripande hållbarhetsfrågorna kan karaktäriseras. Kapitlet lägger vikt vid att diskutera och problematisera de viktiga frågorna, varför behövs en undervisning i hållbar utveckling, vad ska undervisningen innehålla samt hur ska den organiseras.

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  • 7.
    Ek, Anne-Charlotte
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The tension between marketisation and academisation in higher education2013In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 1305-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary changes in higher education in Sweden are characterised by two educational discourses: marketisation and academisation. Demands to meet market requirements, as well as to make education more scientific, have created tensions between and within institutional cultures. Using interviews with 16 heads of departments, the authors investigate how tensions between marketisation and academisation were handled in discipline-oriented and professional-oriented departments. The heads of discipline-oriented departments experienced marketisation as a threat to the university trademark, because it was seen to challenge academic autonomy. On the other hand, heads of professional-oriented departments felt that academisation was the main issue to be dealt with, as it shifted focus from practical skills towards academic meritocracy. Consequently, it is not possible to discuss these changes without considering that conditions differ substantially across the university. Responses to these changes can be countered by culturally sensitive strategies, rather than by adopting a ‘one size fits all’ approach. © 2013 Society for Research into Higher Education.

  • 8.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Lindahl, Britt
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Högskolan i Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Samhällsfrågor i det naturvetenskapliga klassrummet2016 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Science for life - a conceptual framework for construction and analysis of socio-scientific cases.2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework to be used as a tool for analyzing work with socio-scientific issues (SSI) and for constructing SSI cases in secondary school. The framework consists of six components describing the more detailed characteristics of SSI. The components were chosen to reflect what we know from research about what might have an impact on students’ learning and interest in science. Six socio-scientific cases were then constructed and these are discussed in the article. The cases are relevant in that they both display the characteristics of SSI and meet the requirements of the Swedish national curriculum. The components and the cases are described in a table. This work is the first step in an evidence-based research project aiming at investigating if, how and why students and teachers in secondary school develop knowledge and interests when working with SSI. © Naturfagsenteret

  • 10.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Discussing sustainable development among teachers: An analysis from a conflict perspective2014In: International Journal of Environmental and Science Education, ISSN 1306-3065, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 41-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education for Sustainable Development has been discussed as problematic, as a top down directive promoting an "indoctrinating" education. The concept of the intertwined dimensions (economic, social-cultural, and environmental) of sustainable development is seen both as an opportunity and as a limitation for pluralistic views of sustainability. In this paper we study possibilities that allow different perspectives of sustainability to emerge and develop in discussions. We focus on the conflicting perspectives of the intertwined dimensions in some main theoretical models in combination with the use of Wertsch's function of speech framework to construct a conflict reflection tool. As an illustrative case, we apply this conflict reflection tool to an analysis of a discussion among seven secondary school teachers on climate change. The results in this particular example show the dynamics of speech genre and content in developing different perspectives. We conclude our paper with a discussion of the conflicting view of the integrated dimensions of sustainability in relation to an agonistic pluralistic approach, and we consider its relevance in an educational context. © 2006-2014 by iSER, International Society of Educational Research. All Rights Reserved.

  • 11.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Students’ qualification in environmental and sustainability education—epistemic gaps or composites of critical thinking?2016In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 259-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an ‘age of measurement’ where students’ qualification is a hot topic on the political agenda, it is of interest to ask what the function of qualification might implicate in relation to a complex issue as Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and what function environmental and sustainability issues serve in science education. This paper deals with how secondary and upper secondary teachers in discussions with colleagues articulate qualification in relation to educational aims of ESD. With inspiration from discourse theory, the teachers’ articulations of qualification are analysed and put in relation to other functions of education (qualification, socialisation and subjectification). The results of this study show three discourses of qualification: scientific reasoning, awareness of complexity and to be critical. The discourse of ‘qualification as to be critical’ is articulated as a composite of differing epistemological views. In this discourse, the teachers undulate between rationalistic epistemological views and postmodern views, in a pragmatic way, to articulate a discourse of critical thinking which serves as a reflecting tool to bring about different ways of valuing issues of sustainability, which reformulates ‘matter of facts’ towards ‘matter of concerns’ © 2016 Taylor & Francis

  • 12.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    et al.
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Teachers as agents for social change? Myths and Subject positions in transformative sustainability education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In educational practice there is an ongoing discussion, about social change in relation to sustainability (Ferreira 2013; Jickling & Wals 2008, 2013; Laessö 2010). When our contemporary way of living is declared as unsustainable, and education is put to make a ‘social change’ towards a more ‘sustainable living’, we interpret this from a discourse theoretical view as the educational system becomes dislocated in the attempts of interpret this new order to strive for (Laclau & Mouffe 2001; Laclau 1990). In this state, new articulations develops to interpret how to make a new structure to stabilise the new order. Social change does not have any inherent meaning per se, it becomes formulated through its contextual use in practice. Therefore we find it fruitful to gain empirical knowledge of how teaching for ‘social change’ can be articulated in relation to sustainability. More specifically, we have formulated the following research questions as: - Which subjects positions among teachers can be identified in ESD discourses of social change? - Which 'myths' of social change can be identified in ESD discourses? By using theoretical frameworks of Laclau and Mouffe and Biesta, we identifies teachers’ subject positions and emerging ‘myths’ through analyses of articulations in teacher colleagues discussions of important aims of sustainability in relation to ESD. Discourse theory, analysing teachers discussions To analyse how 'social change' (re)articulate desirable aims in educational practice, we start from teacher discussions. The analyses focus articulations where students are supposed to act in relation to sustainability. Through the central meaning of those articulations, new spaces of representations are opened where it becomes possible to legitimate actions as natural, in the light of this new order (myth). In this study we have been able to identify three struggling ESD-discourses of ‘social change’, comprising desirable teacher-specific-positions and emerging myths of ‘social change’. twenty teachers in total were selected and divided into five groups which consisting of three to six colleagues in each group. The participants were science and social science teachers in secondary and upper secondary schools in Sweden. The chosen schools were either certified ESD-schools or actively involved in projects concerning sustainability. Each group discussion, which lasted about an hour, were recorded and transcribed. The result shows how the teacher is simultaneously identified in three struggling positions; the rational subject as a neutral conductor; the responsible subject as a role model or the reconstructing subject as a reconstructor. This depending on how schooling, socialisation towards sustainable lifestyles and political and ethical perspectives are identified as aims and educational functions (Biesta 2009), to formulate the myth of ‘social change’ in ESD. This has implications on how to acknowledge ‘social change’ as mainly being a process to empower students for ‘right’ choices or to uphold ‘social change’ as a way for students to explore new interpretations of a more sustainable living, to develop as political subjects (c.f. Lundegård & Wickaman 2012).

  • 13.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Critical thinking as room for subjectification in Education for Sustainable Development2015In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 239-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Issues of sustainability are complex and often steeped with ethical and political questions without predefined or general answers. This paper deals with how secondary and upper secondary teachers discuss these complex issues, by analysing their aims for Education for Sustainable Development. With inspiration from discourse theory, their articulations about students as political subjects are analysed. Critical thinking emerged as a nodal point in teachers’ discussions. In this study, critical thinking is articulated as having various qualitative meanings related to different epistemological views. On one hand, critical thinking is articulated to invite room for subjectification; but on the other hand, room for subjectification is challenged when critical thinking is articulated through the educational aims of qualification and socialisation. A consequence of changing epistemological view might be that political and ethical issues take a back seat. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 14.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sweden.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Konsekvenser av handlande i en komplex värld2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med delen är att bidra till hur skolan kan arbeta med komplexa sammanhang, människans betydelse i förhållande till lokala och globala perspektiv av påverkan och ansvar, betydelsen av hur vi tolkar kunskaper genom olika värdegrunder och vilken betydelse vi ger individens handlingar. Det konkretiseras med exempel på fördelar och nackdelar med olika val. Det förs även resonemang om hur människans handlingar bidrar till och ifall de har betydelse för en hållbar utveckling i en komplex värld.

    Deltagarna får genomföra en undervisning som bygger på livscylelanalys (LCA) och redogöra för den. Erfarenheterna används för ämnesövergripande diskussioner om hur undervisningen kan utvecklas.

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  • 15.
    Hillbur, Per
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Response and responsibility: fabrication of the eco-certified citizen in Swedish curricula 1962–20112016In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 409-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the fabrication of the eco-certified citizen, an ideal – rather than real – citizen constructed through requirements of both needed knowledge and a kind of personhood, with specific qualities. The societal demands of knowledge-response to environmental problems are studied, as well as the student’s (future citizen’s) responsibility in relation to these problems, in five subsequent national curricula for the Swedish compulsory school between 1962 and 2011. How does environmental education operate as a hub for constructing desirable citizens? From a theoretical framework of governmentality, the article explores how political rationalities for society and citizenship emerge. Our findings show how recent curricula, by using space and time metaphors, fabricate the eco-certified citizen as an individualistic, globalized person who is able and willing to use scientific knowledge to make decisions and develop opinions about the world. Citizenship has evolved as a competence rather than an ongoing practice, meaning that one has to prove oneself as a legitimate citizen. This emerging, post-political, citizenship differs from citizenship posited in 1960s’ curricula – a combination of traditional family values and democratic involvement in the local society. © 2016 Taylor & Francis

  • 16.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Hillbur, Per
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Det KRAV-märkta barnet: Om subjektskonstruktioner i lärande för hållbar utveckling2015In: Resultatdialog 2015 / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2015, p. 85-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 17.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Jobér, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Lundström, Mats
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Naturvetenskap för medborgerlig bildning2013In: Medborgerlig bildning: Demokrati och inkludering för ett hållbart samhälle / [ed] Nanny Hartsmar & Bodil Liljefors Persson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1:1, p. 145-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här boken diskuterar och problematiserar författarna medborgerlig bildning ur olika perspektiv. De ställer frågor om vad som krävs för att barn och ungdomar ska utvecklas till kompetenta, reflekterande, kritiska och aktiva medborgare med möjlighet att ta ansvar. 
Vilka krav på kompetenser krävs inom så specifika områden? I detta specifika kaptiel får läsaren ta del av varför medborgerlig bildning har en plats inom det naturvetenskapliga fältet.

  • 18.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eco-certified students? The governance of souls in Education for Sustainable Development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today is the term "Education for Sustainable Development" (ESD) tainted by with notions of the "exemplary life" and "desirable future". This practice is exercised in school all over the world. The aim with the paper is to unveil how teaching materials in ESD are governing students through different technologies of the self. The paper departs from the idea that discourses decide what is possible to think, say and do in a specific historical and cultural context. To understand how these discourses are internalised into peoples thinking, saying and doing we study a process of governmentality. This process must be understood on three levels: Political rationalities; Political programs; Technologies of the self. Our paper problematizes the concepts of ”the good person” and ”the exemplarily life”. We are analysing three different types of teaching material often used in ESD. One criterion for the choice is that the material use science and mathematical calculations for the representation of sustainable development, since we are interested in how these rationalities are used in the process of governmentality. The teaching material is analysed through discourse analysis. In the result can we show how diagrams and mathematical calculations used in the teaching material can be understood as governing technologies for four different political rationalities: 1) Individuals are free and obliged to make choices in the modern society; 2) Everyone is responsible for a common future; 3) Belief in scientific and technological solutions; 4) Idea of the progress. Calculations and Diagrams are instruments in governing the modern human being. These – scientific – representations of ideas of how society should be organised, of how an expected future can be met and how individuals should act are governing our souls, how we want to be in order to be seen as good and “eco-certified” people.

  • 19.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Environmental education as epistemological imperialism: How Swedish exceptionalism is constructed through the Otherness Machinery2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Sustainable development is often described as a global project, including everyone everywhere in the fight for a better ‘common future’. Theaim of this paper is to problematize this inclusive project through an analysis of how good intentions in Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE)construct and maintain differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’. We are interested in exposing social constructions of normality and otherness in the taken-for- granted good intentions within ESE.Objectives: The analysis focuses textbooks used in Swedish schools, how texts and pictures operate as cogwheels in what we call Otherness machinery,discursively constructing who is ‘normal’ and who is ‘the Other’. We examine how representations of race and nationality construct (un)desirable subjects inside the discourse of ESE. The theoretical framework builds on 1) critical race theory and whiteness studies and 2) theories on double gestures of inclusion and exclusion in education. When trying to help or foster the Orher, we are, at the same time, in a double gesture, constructing the ones in need asabjects, those who ‘need to be saved’ into a specific norm.Methods: The empirical material consists of teaching material about sustainable development: five textbooks in science, civics and geography for primary and lower secondary school and two thematic fact books for school. From the books, we extracted parts that were concerned with sustainable development and environmental issues for a closer analysis.In the analysis of the material, we studied how normality (in this case Swedishness) and Otherness are constructed and who (in terms of the entanglement ofrace and nationality) is representing what. The question is how Sweden, or ‘We’, is constructed in relation to the Other and what discursive consequences these positions have attached to them.Results: The result is presented through five dichotomies structuring the ESD discourse: Tradition/Civilization, Dirtiness/Purity, Chaos/Order, Ignorance/Morality and Helped/Helping. Through these dichotomies we show how differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’ are constructed and maintained inthe textbooks about sustainable development and environment. Sweden, and Swedishness, are with help from different - uncivilized or immoral others - constructed as exceptional. We claim that these representations of race and nationality imply a colonial gaze.Conclusion: The paper addresses the risk that a child who engages in the ESE practice come to meet the world with a colonial gaze and an aim to foster the Other into a specific way of living. It discusses how the global project of sustainable development is transformed through a discourse of “Swedish exceptionalism”. In a double gesture of inclusion and exclusion, the rest of the world appears in need of help, development, or – in some cases – higher moral standards. The including ESE project must thus be understood as a colonial, and excluding practice – a form of epistemological imperialism.

  • 20.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Governing ‘eco-certified children’ through pastoral power: critical perspectives on education for sustainable development2015In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how ‘eco-certified children’ are constructed as desirable subjects in teaching materials addressing education for sustainable development. We are interested in how discourses structure this cherished practice and how this practice has become ‘natural’ and obvious for us. A discourse analysis is carried out by looking at the material through the lens of Foucault’s notion of pastoral power. The analysis departs from teaching material addressing issues on sustainable development: (1) textbooks for primary and secondary school; (2) games targeted at preschool and school children; and (3) children’s books about sustainable development. The results show that the discourse of education for sustainable development is characterized by scientific and mathematical objectiv- ity and faith in technological development. It emphasizes the right of the individ- ual and the obligation to make free, however ‘correct’, choices. In the teaching materials, the eco-certified child therefore emerges as knowing, conscious, rational, sacrificing and active. This child is constructed through knitting together personal guilt with global threats, detailed individual activities with rescuing the flock and the planet. In a concluding discussion, we discuss how ESD is framed in a neoliberal ideology. With the help of ESD, an economic discourse becomes dressed in an almost poetic language.

  • 21.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    'Our common world' belongs to 'Us': constructions of otherness in education for sustainable development2014In: Critical Studies in Education, ISSN 1750-8487, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 369-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse how good intentions in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) discursively construct and maintain differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’. The empirical material consists of textbooks about sustainable development used in Swedish schools. An analysis of how ‘Us’ and ‘Them’ are constructed and maintained is done with help from critical race theory, whiteness studies and Popkewitz’ notion of double gestures, exclusion through intentions of inclusion. The analysis departs from five dichotomies: tradition/civilisation, dirtiness/purity, chaos/ order, ignorance/morality and helped/helping. We consider these dichotomies as cog- wheels operating in an ‘Otherness machinery’. Through this machinery, ‘We’ are constructed as knowing, altruistic, conscious and good. The Other is simultaneously constructed as ‘uncivilised’ or as a ‘bad’ Other in need of higher moral standards. With help from these two Others, ‘Swedish exceptionalism’ is formed. The ESD project could then be understood as a colonial and excluding project, and we ask how it is possible to avoid that ‘our common world’ only belong to ‘Us’?

  • 22.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Teacher Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Teacher Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Department of Mathematics, Technology and Science Education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Culturally Equipped for Socio-Scientific Issues? A comparative study on how teachers and students in mono- and multiethnic schools handle work with complex issues2011In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 33, no 13, p. 1835-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) are not only said to increase students’ interest in science, but they also strengthen the generic skills of teamwork, problem-solving, and media literacy. At the same time, these skills are prerequisites for successful work with SSI. The aim of the study is to analyze what happens when SSI are implemented in science classrooms with various degrees of ethnic diversity and socio-cultural status. We are also interested in knowing how teachers structure the SSI work from discourses on what suits different students. Quantitative and qualitative methods are combined, for example, questionnaires and ethnographic fieldwork, presented through partial least squares analysis and thick descriptions. We can notice discursive differences between ‘Us’ and ‘The Other’ and between mono- and multiethnic schools. In an earlier research, images of differences between the different student groups emerged, and we can find these in the results from the questionnaires. In an observation study, another pattern appeared that indicated similarities rather than differences between mono- and multiethnic classrooms. The students are first of all inside the discourse of ‘the successful student.’ Noteworthy is that the teachers’ roles correspond better with the discourse than with how students actually act. The study also shows that SSI articulate a collision between different discourses on education: a discourse on differences between students in multiand monoethnic classrooms; a discourse on how to become a successful student; and a discourse on the school’s mission to educate participating citizens. It is suggested that schools should relate to, expose, and articulate discursive clashes that emerge when introducing new work forms. © 2011 Taylor & Francis

  • 23.
    Kyza, Eleni A.
    et al.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus.
    Malmberg, ClaesHalmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Part 4 : Strand 4 : Digital resources for science teaching and learning2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lagerholm, Charlotte
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Analysing representations of concept in physics textbooks for lower secondary school in Sweden – the concept of pressure2017In: Analysing representations of concept in physics textbooks for lower secondary school in Sweden – the concept of pressure, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Representations of scientific concepts are important tools for creating understanding of science. In connection with the scientific concepts mentioned in textbooks it is common to use many other forms of representation to clarify them. In this study, we focus on physics textbooks for lower secondary school and more specifically, how the concept of pressure is presented. The examination of the textbooks will be divided into in two parts. In the first part we study the representations that occur from a quantitative perspective. The representations will be sorted into three main categories (Liu & Khine, 2016). For each category there are sub-categories. In the second part of the study, representations will be studied from a qualitative perspective and described with respect to how they are used and interconnected in the textbooks. In this second part, the representations are analysed and sorted into four main categories (Slough, McTigue, Suyeon, & Jennings, 2010). Preliminary results from the first part of the study show that textual representations dominate together with graphical representations in all textbooks, while the mathematical representations only occur occasionally. The second part of the study is on-going and preliminary results will be presented and discussed, together with implication for teaching.

  • 25.
    Lagerholm, Charlotte
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Eriksson, Urban
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Analysing representations of concept in physics textbooks for lower secondary school in Sweden – the concept of pressure2017In: Paper presentations – posters – symposia – workshops, 2017, p. 195-197Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Representations of scientific concepts are important tools for creating understanding of science. In connection with the scientific concepts mentioned in textbooks it is common to use many other forms of representation to clarify them. In this study, we focus on physics textbooks for lower secondary school and more specifically, how the concept of pressure is presented. The examination of the textbooks will be divided into in two parts. In the first part we study the representations that occur from a quantitative perspective. The representations will be sorted into three main categories (Liu & Khine, 2016). For each category there are sub-categories. In the second part of the study, representations will be studied from a qualitative perspective and described with respect to how they are used and interconnected in the textbooks. In this second part, the representations are analysed and sorted into four main categories (Slough, McTigue, Suyeon, & Jennings, 2010). Preliminary results from the first part of the study show that textual representations dominate together with graphical representations in all textbooks, while the mathematical representations only occur occasionally. The second part of the study is on-going and preliminary results will be presented and discussed, together with implication for teaching.

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  • 26.
    Lagerholm, Charlotte
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Eriksson, Urban
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sverige & Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Säger en bild mer än tusen ord?2019In: Från forskning till fysikundervisning: Bidrag från konferensen 10–11 april 2018 i Lund arrangerad av Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik / [ed] Karin Stolpe, Gunnar Höst, Andreas Larsson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019, p. 49-59Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenska läroböcker i fysik har utvecklats från att vara främst textbaserade till att numera innehålla ett stort antal representationer. Fotografier och teckningar men också variation i teckenstil eller matematiska formler är exempel på representationer som används för att förtydliga innehållet i texten. Studiens huvudsakliga syfte är att analysera vilka representationer som förekommer i fysikläroböcker för högstadiet i Sverige och hur dessa representationer används. För denna studie har ett kategoriseringsverktyg tagits fram. Verktyget används såväl för att kategorisera representationerna som för att analysera användningen av dem. Läroböckerna uppvisar stora likheter när det gäller hur de representerar begrepp. Resultatet visar att liknade representationer används i alla läroböckerna. Böckernas kapitel inleds med stora färgfotografier, inte alltid med ett tydligt syfte eller koppling till innehållet. Få fotografier och teckningar är relaterade till elevers vardag. Matematiska representationer såsom tabeller och formler är sällsynta och ingen av läroböckerna har med något diagram. Sammanfattningsvis är dessa inte läroböcker som kan sättas i händerna på elever utan vägledning från läraren. Ofta förväntas eleverna kombinera text och representation på egen hand där det krävs förkunskaper för att förstå representationerna. Det hade därför varit till nytta om representationerna bidrog med mer detaljerad information om hur de ska läsas. © Nationellt centrum för naturvetenskapernas och teknikens didaktik och författarna. Distribueras av Nationellt centrum för naturvetenskapernas och teknikens didaktik vid Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Linköpings universitet.

  • 27.
    Lindahl, Britt
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Rosberg, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rehn, Agneta
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Socio-Scientific Issues – A Way to Improve Students’ Interest and Learning?2011In: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613, E-ISSN 1930-1529, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 342-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to many documents, there is a strong need to renew science education. One way could be to work with SSI (socio-scientific issues). This paper reports on both students’ and teachers’ experiences and learning when working with socio-scientific issues in science education in secondary school (aged from 13 to 16). The approach is multidimensional, as factors that influence cognition as well as motivation and the forming of attitudes are complex. Results suggest that SSI work forms are more important than personal factors for explaining outcomes. Relevant issues, autonomy and functioning group work seem to be important aspects of successful SSI work together with structure provided by the teacher, and information that challenges previous knowledge. In general, SSI seems to be most efficient for students, who believe that they learn from presenting and discussing their knowledge, focus on “the large picture”, acknowledge own responsibility for learning, find school science personally relevant and are self-efficacious. It seems that the outcomes from SSI work are much in the hands of the teacher. This paper is a short summary of the first year and quantitative part of the project. Further results from the project will later be found in our homepage (http://www.sisc.se).

  • 28.
    Lundblad, Thomas
    et al.
    Olympia School, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Areskoug, Mats
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Per
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Dialogic manifestations of an augmented reality simulation2013In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, Vol. 2, p. 45-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we focus on the use of a combination of socio-scientific issues (SSI) and simulations. We have developed an augmented reality (AR) simulation called Transformer. The SSI narrative in Transformer concerns an electric transformer station situated in an area close to a planned new campus. Students’ task is the issue if it is advisable to build a campus area. The simulation is organized as a role-play. The students take part in groups, playing one of five different roles. The aim of this study is to explore students’ ways of using knowledge in relation to the AR simulation. We investigate how students integrate science and other knowledge in the debate constituting the final part of the role-play. The study is a part of a research process, guiding the researchers to further develop Transformer. The study showed that students justified their positions using scientific evidence and information collected through their own efforts outdoors in the real and actual environment where the AR simulation was situated. Students kept the controversy that existed between the different roles alive throughout the debate and stayed focused on the issue in question. We argue that this is due to the situated context achieved through the simulation.

  • 29.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Globala mål och möten2021Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hasslöf, Helen
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Didaktiska utmaningar och perspektiv på hållbar utveckling: Grundskola åk 1-62021Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktionen tar upp det vi kallar ett didaktiskt raster. Syftet med det är att ge en inblick i hur hållbarhetsfrågorna diskuteras i pedagogisk och didaktisk forskning och låta det bli redskap för reflektion över didaktiska vad-, hur- och varför-frågor kopplat till undervisning. I inledningen till modulen ligger frågornas allvar som en resonansbotten. Här tar vi upp några didaktiska spår som sedan följs upp i de olika delarna. Som vuxna behöver vi ta ansvar för våra barn och kommande generationer. I det sammanhanget är ditt arbete som lärare är ett av det mest viktiga som finns. Men hur problematiken ska tacklas i mötet med de yngre åldrarna är omdiskuterat. Här är det viktigt att inte förlora hoppet om att det också går att vända vissa av de negativa trenderna. Därför vill vi också bjuda på ingångar till hur man kan närma sig ett problematiskt och mörkt budskap genom att inspirera eleverna till nya tankar som ger dem kraft att kunna ta till sig och bearbeta de negativa bilder de omges av. 

  • 31. Lundström, Mats
    et al.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmberg, Claes
    Rör inte min pizza: fjärdeklassares samtal om hälsoval2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta forskningsprojekt har 10-åringar fått diskutera olika möjligheter att förbättra sin hälsa. Det övergripande syftet med studien är att undersöka vilka olika typer av kunskap, erfarenheter och identitetsmarkörer som barnen använder när de diskuterar hälsa. I studien deltog tre fjärdeklasser från Malmö, men från områden med skilda socioekonomiska förhållanden. Totalt deltog 66 elever, fördelade på 15 grupper. Varje grupp fick diskutera fyra olika alternativ som skulle kunna förbättra deras hälsa. De skulle sedan enas om två alternativ och tillsammans skriva ett brev till hälsoministern där de motiverade sina val. Alternativen var följande: 1) hela familjen skulle cykla till jobb, skola och fritidsaktiviteter som fanns i samma stad; 2) att det bara skulle serveras grönsaker, sallad och frukt som middag hemma två gånger/vecka; 3) en begränsning av dator- och tv-användandet till max 10 timmar/ vecka; 4) extra skatt på mat som pizza och hamburgare. Elevdiskussionerna transkriberades och analyserades därefter utifrån en diskurspsykologisk ram (Potter and Wetherell, 1987), närmare bestämt vilka så kallade tolkningsrepertoarer som eleverna använde i diskussionerna. Med tolkningsrepertoarer avses diskurser som används i syfte att föra fram argument och samtidigt skapa en temporär identitet – vem man vill vara. En klar majoritet av grupperna enades om att de kunde vara beredda att cykla mer och att det var acceptabelt att det bara skulle serveras vegetariskt på middagsbordet två gånger/vecka. Däremot såg de begränsning av dator- och tv-användandet samt extra skatt på viss mat som en klar inskränkning i sina vanor som de inte var beredda att ställa upp på. En preliminär analys av data visar att eleverna använder tolkningsrepertoarer som vardagsliv, egenintresse, ekonomi samt naturvetenskap/hållbar utveckling/miljö i sina diskussioner. Däremot saknas nästan helt en tolkningsrepertoar där eleverna tydligt använder en global repertoar.

  • 32.
    Magnusson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Pramgård, Ann-Britt
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Stenberg, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Tapia, Pablo
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Wilhelmsson, Hanna
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Vad är en utbildning på vetenskaplig grund? – ett samarbetsprojekt mellan Centrum för Akademiskt lärarskap och Bibliotek & IT2014Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Att intervjua elever om hållbar utveckling2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet beskriver hur lärare kan intervjua elever med avseende på arbete med lärande och hållbar utveckling.

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  • 34.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Framtidsverkstad2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Hållbar utveckling och bedömning2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här texten behandlar formativ bedömning som, eftersom den har fokus på elevers lärande, också går under namnet lärande bedömning. Texten kommer att knyta an till såväl utbildning för hållbar utveckling som ämnesövergripande undervisning. Anknytningen rör komplexiteten i frågorna, autenticiteten, det pluralistiska perspektivet och det demokratiska handlingsperspektivet. När det gäller formativ bedömning görs nedslag i autentiska problem, autentisk bedömning, planering genom formativt förhållningsätt samt matriser.

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  • 36.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Intressekonflikter och handlingskompetens2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet belyser två perspektiv på lärande och hållbar utveckling. Det ena perspektivet behandlar demokratisk handlingskompetens. Det andra behandlar intressekonflikter i utnyttjandet av naturresurser.

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  • 37.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Metoder för kommunikation2019Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Texten ger exempel på metoder som kan användas för att skapa kommunikation och ett dialogiskt klassrum.

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  • 38.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Professional development in education for sustainable development – a Swedish example2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with an important part of the school's mission - education for sustainable development (ESD). It describes a teacher training and professional development module produced by the Swedish National Agency for Education, the central administrative authority for the public school system. The module is cross-curricular and aims at teachers in secondary school. When following the module, teachers work in project groups with collective and collegial learning. Five researchers representing the areas of ESD, education, science education and political science author the module.

    The module raise questions as; why should we educate for sustainable development?, what content should we deliver and how should we teach? These questions connect to pedagogical content knowledge (PCK).

    The why question, the purpose of ESD, is described as composed of three interconnected functions . The functions are defined as:

    • Qualification - learning to be able to act and contribute to society • Socialisation - to grow into current norms and values • Subjectification - To develop a personal approach in social contexts and to visualize subjects not previously noted.

    The other main issue concerns the question "what". What subject content will be taught in the classroom and what questions will be addressed? The central point is that content issues in ESD always rest on values that lead to conflicts of interest between people. Consequently, they should be treated from a pluralistic point of view.

    The third question addresses how ESD should be instructed. It is through activities that students train to use knowledge and thus develop it.

    The teacher training and professional development module consists of eight parts dealing with different perspectives on ESD.

    Each part is divided in four moments. The participants are working with theory and classrooms activities and reaserach based studies on ther own practice.

  • 39.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    SCIENCE|ENVIRONMENT|HEALTH – the issue of environmental education2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Skolan och eleverna – mottagare av kunskap och deltagare i förändring2018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med kapitlet är att ge idéer om samspelet mellan innehållet i hållbar utveckling, skolans övergripande uppdrag och undervisningens organisation. Kapitlet utgår från hållbar utvecklings komplexa, konfliktfyllda och ämnesövergripande karaktär där det empiriskt faktabetonade möter det normativa politiska.

    Kapitlet presenterar också hur undervisningen kan organiseras med hjälp av grupparbete, värderingsövningar och rollspel.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41. Malmberg, Claes
    Tematiskt arbete med hållbar utveckling2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Malmö Högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö Högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    KRAV-märkta barn i det neoliberala samhället2014In: Styrningskonst på utbildningsarenan: Upphöjda begrepp i svensk utbildningsdiskurs / [ed] Thom Axelsson, Jutta Balldin & Jonas Qvarsebo, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1:1, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att alla människor måste sträva för en hållbar utveckling för världen har blivit en självklarhet i den allmänna debatten de senaste decennierna. Det sägs att ”alla” måste dra sitt strå till stacken för att bidra till en bättre värld, både ekonomiskt, socialt och inte minst ekologiskt. I talet om ”alla” har barnen en särskild roll, eftersom de omtalas som framtidens medborgare. Därför har skolan ett uppdrag att utbilda för hållbar utveckling, att fostra en specifik typ av medborgare. Frågan är dock vilka krav som ställs på denna önskvärda medborgare? Hur ser den önskvärda människan ut och vem konstrueras samtidigt som den som hotar den goda framtiden? Man kan också fråga sig vilka politiska ideal som materialiseras genom diskursen om ”Det KRAV-märkta barnet”, och hur dessa ideal kommuniceras som självklara istället för politiska.

  • 43.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    The West and the Rest – Constructions of Us and Them in Education for Sustainable Development2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education for sustainable development is a global project, with good intentions. One aim of the project is to rescue ’our common planet’ in terms of social, ecological and social change. It is also a project that aims to include everyone. The aim of this paper is to problematize who is included in this inclusive project. It is done through an analysis of how good intentions in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) construct and maintain differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’. In other words, we are interested in exposing social constructions of normality and otherness in the taken-for-granted good intentions within ESD and question what the idea of a ‘common world’ implies.

  • 44.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Rafolt, Susanne
    University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Critical Thinking, politics and political participation in S|E|H – to describe and/or prescribe as a teacher?2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ongoing research projects carried out by Halmstad University in cooperation with University of York and by University of Innsbruck aim to understand how science teachers approach politics in the classroom and how pre-service science teachers understand critical thinking. We argue that political participation and critical thinking needs to be at the heart of Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H) pedagogy to make effective change and find solutions to urgent social issues in a democracy. Critical thinking is crucial for negotiating socially urgent issues, such as climate change and pandemics, and debunking misinformation (e.g., Jiménez-Aleixandre & Puig 2022) and, thus, for civic education (e.g., ten Dam & Volman 2004; Glaser 1985; Oulton et al. 2004). Teachers need to create possibilities for young people to engage in actions to handle urgent societal challenges, that is political participation (Ekman & Amnå 2012). Science teachers might be reluctant to address politics and critical thinking both when it comes to prescribing and describing teaching content. However, especially in the context of S|E|H, neither science and school science nor critical thinking is independent of politics. Both S|E|H contents and critical thinking include descriptive and normative aspects and relate to conflict of interests and values. Therefore, teachers need to handle critical thinking, politics and political participation in a thoughtful way. The aim of the round table is to discuss future research about teaching critical thinking and politics in the science classroom and furthermore to consider theoretical and normative aspects - points of departure, conclusions and recommendations - in such research. First, the chairs will provide a short input. Then, participants discuss in small groups: 1) What kind of empirical research is needed? 2) How do we as researchers handle theoretical and normative aspects in research? Finally, all participants of the round table share their ideas.

  • 45.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Health and sustainable development education: A paradox of responsibility?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health and sustainable development are two urgent and global issues that needto be addressed by all societies.The issues are also an important part of the school curricula and present in everyday teaching.By this education has a key function in both qualifyingand socializing students to becomeactive individuals and citizens. Accordingly, health and sustainable development should be considered as both science and social science issues. The purpose of this chapter is to analyze and discuss how health and sustainable development aredescribed in Swedish textbooksforBiology, Science and Physicaleducationand health. The theoretical point of departure is the distinction between individual and societal/political responsibility. Thechapter showsthatthe textbooks create what we call a paradox of responsibility. This means that the issues are de-politicized (individualized) and that the responsibility is placed on the individual rather than on the societal/political level even when such solutions are needed. How textbooks portray issues is of great importance since it influences students understanding of the problems and their thinkablesolutions. We argue that health and sustainable developmentin school alwaysshould be portrayed as both individual andsocietal/political issues in order to empower the students to deal with the issues in a more adequate way.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Health education and citizenship - from democratic politics to individual responsibility?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research health is, in contemporary western societies, seen as an increasingly non-political issue. Rather than being at the centre of collective decision-making and democratic politics, health is more and more regarded as resting on individual responsibility. In our study we address the question of health education in schools as well as the question of citizenship. Our study consists of two parts. Firstly, we analyse whether health is portrayed as a political or non-political issue in teaching material, that is, whether health is regarded as a governmental or as an individual issue. Secondly, and informed by the results from our analyse, we dissect and problematize what kind of citizen (citizenship) that is constructed in teaching material. Our empirical data consists of Swedish textbooks for secondary and upper-secondary school in three school subjects’ biology, home economics and physical education and health. Our preliminary results are that the issue of health is quite strictly de-politicized and regarded as the responsibility of the individual, which not only corroborates previous research on health and citizenship. It also reinforces the currently predominant construction of the individual as detached from politics and democracy.

  • 47.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Health in school: stress, individual responsibility and democratic politics2019In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 14, no 863, p. 863-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, in contemporary western societies health is seen as an increasingly non-political issue. Rather than being at the centre of collective decision-making and democratic politics, health is regarded as resting on individual responsibility. In this study we focus on, and explore an important and challenging socio-scientific issue through the concepts of politicization and the depoliticization. We address the question of health education in schools as well as the question of citizenship and democracy, which adds to research on scientific literacy and socio-scientific issues. The study consists of two parts: firstly, we analyse whether health—more precisely stress—is portrayed as a political or non-political issue in textbooks for secondary school; secondly, and informed by the results from our analysis, we dissect and problematise what kind of citizenship that is constructed in textbooks. From a theoretical framework of politics, the article explores how citizenship emerges. Our findings show that health, and more precisely stress, is depoliticized in the textbooks. Firstly, stress is regarded as an individual—not public or governmental—concern. Secondly, stress is depoliticized in a more rigorous manner by making its political dimensions invisible. A consequence is a displacement of stress, e.g., in school, from the democratic arena to the individual citizen. As an implication we recommend an education that emphasize a political and democratic perspective on health as a complement to the individual perspective. © 2018, The Author(s).

  • 48.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hopp och handling – att bidra till elevers politiska deltagande2021Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Är det möjligt att ge elever hopp om framtiden i en tid med klimatförändringar och miljöhot? Hur kan elevers handlingskompetens utvecklas? Syftet med denna moduldel är att du som lärare ska få didaktiska tankeredskap som hjälper dig att utveckla elevers strategier för att hantera oro och förstå betydelsen av att handla.

  • 49.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Science|Environment|Health, young citizens and eco-and health depression – a need for scientific holism2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We live in an individualized era. Responsibility for handling problems within complex S|E|H-fields such as health and sustainability are placed on the individual rather than on the society.

    Furthermore, young citizens often have a pessimistic view on the future with no clear solutions on problems. We also know that students are exposed to social media and “alternative facts”. Phenomena as eco-depression, health-depression and cognitive dissonance are put forward by S|E|H- researchers as something that often can be found among young citizens.

    School can combat eco- and health depression by using a holistic scientific perspective. This means that a pure scientific perspective on health and sustainable development must be complemented by an action competence perspective. In this respect is the concept of framing is central. School should give good examples of how challenges and problems historically have been and, in the future, can be tackled by individuals as well as by societies and political institutions. By this, school promotes action competence and hope.

    The presentation will use societal historical and contemporary S|E|H- cases and illustrate how these can be transformed into classroom practices. The presentation will discuss how the concepts of framing, responsibility and democratic politics contributes to Scientific Holism in a new Science|Environment|Health pedagogy.

  • 50.
    Malmberg, Claes
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    The Framing of Health and Sustainable Development as Individual Responsibility Contributes to the Paradox of Responsibility2021In: Science | Environment | Health: Towards a Science Pedagogy of Complex Living Systems / [ed] Albert Zeyer; Regula Kyburz-Graber, Switzerland: Springer Nature, 2021, p. 85-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health and sustainable development are two urgent and global issues that need to be addressed by all societies. They are also an important part of school curricula and present in everyday teaching. Hence education has a key function in qualifying and socialising students to become active individuals and citizens. Accordingly, health and sustainable development should be considered as both science and social science issues. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss how health and sustainable development are described in Swedish textbooks for biology, science and physical education and health. The theoretical point of departure is the distinction between individual and societal/political responsibility. The chapter argues that the textbooks create what we call a ‘paradox of responsibility’. This means that the problems are de-politicised (individualised) and that responsibility is placed on the individual rather than on the societal/political level even when such solutions are needed. How textbooks portray such science and social science issues is of great importance since it influences students’ understanding of the problems and their thinkable solutions. We argue that health and sustainable development in school should always be portrayed as both individual and societal/political issues to empower students to deal with them in an adequate way. 

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