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  • 1.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Workshops as Nodes of Knowledge Co-production: Beyond Ideas of Automagical Synergies2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 53-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Fors, VaikeHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).Willim, RobertLunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3. Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Pink, Sarah
    Fors, Vaike
    Automation in the Wild: exploring empathy2015In: Un/Certainty / [ed] Sarah Pink & Yoko Akama, Melbourne: RMIT University , 2015, p. 50-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 4.
    Brodersen, Meike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Automating the first and last mile? Reframing the ‘challenges’ of everyday mobilities2023In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we interrogate the utility of conceptualising the ‘first and last mile’ (FLM) as a ‘challenge’ to be addressed through automated and integrated mobility services. We critically engage with the concept through a design anthropological approach which takes two steps so as: to complicate literatures that construct the FLM as a place where automated, service-based and micro-mobility innovations will engender sustainable modal choices above individual automobility; and to demonstrate how people’s situated mobility competencies and values, shape social and material realities and future imaginaries of everyday mobilities. To do so, we draw on ethnographic research into everyday mobility practices, meanings and imaginaries in a suburban neighbourhood in Sweden. We show how locally situated mobilities both challenge the spatial and temporal underpinnings of the first and last mile concept, and resist universalist technology-driven automation narratives. We argue that instead of attempting to bridge gaps in seemingly linear journeys through automated systems, there is a need to account for the practices, tensions and desires embedded in everyday mobilities. © 2023 The Author(s).

  • 5.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Knowing As "Känsla": Accounting For Knowing As An Outcome Of Sensory Emplaced Learning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within education studies there have been calls for systematic attention to how learning is situated, to the notion of context and to experiential elements of learning. In recent decades theories of situated learning and cognitive learning theories have existed in a critical relationship to each other and by the twenty first century a major debate raged between the two positions (Sfard, 1998; Säljö, 2003, Hodkinson et al 2008). At a more sophisticated level situated learning theory offers an alternative to cognitive learning theories that draw on the root metaphor of acquisition. Instead it understands thinking as embedded in social and material practices and conceptualises learning through the metaphor of participation (Lave & Wenger, 1991).

    In this context there is an on-going search for new ways to understand the situatedness of learning as well as its experiential qualities. In our recent work we have addressed this need by developing a framework that builds on Lave and Wenger’s ideas of situatedness and Hodkinssons’et. al (2008) call for moving on from the recent debate between cognitive and sociocultural theorists informed by theories of place, perception and the senses. Theories of place, perception and knowledge in human geography and anthropology, offer an ideal route through which to respond to this call. They offer accounts of place that acknowledge the relationship between spatial and temporal process (Massey 2005), and the embodied nature of learning, while advancing the agenda further to suggest that the senses and the environment are central to how we learn (e.g. Ingold 2000, Pink 2009).We call this framework sensory emplaced learning (Fors, Bäckström & Pink, 2013), through which we conceptualize how learning is situated in the dynamics between body– senses – material environments.

    In this paper we draw from our respective ethnographic research projects on social and cultural informal learning among young people in two very different, albeit Swedish, contexts. Through our field work with people on the one hand publishing and talking about images and texts on a particular website and on the other hand practicing skateboarding, we have come to question the idea of knowledge as acquisition. This mainly cognitive metaphor for learning and knowing applies poorly to the practices of learning and knowing that we have studied. Instead, we argue for a theoretical development around the Swedish term “känsla”, (pronounced shensla). This Swedish word encompasses feeling, sensation, affect, emotion and style and derives from the verb känna – to feel, to sense. Etymologically the word is closely related to one of the Swedish words for knowledge – “kännedom” (Wessén, 1982). Hence, the main objective of this paper is to develop the theoretical thinking that revolve around the Swedish conceptualisation of “känsla” which, we argue, could provide useful for analysing how we know, handle and make meaning of everyday life in and through our sensorial bodies emplaced in material contexts.

    Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources Used The empirical material analysed in this paper emanates from two different sets of data that was produced in two different research projects with a similar methodological ethnographic approach; sensory ethnography (as developed by Pink 2009/2012). A sensory ethnography approach has the advantage of focusing the experiences of lived space, i.e. the crossroads between people’s bodies, their minds and place. In other words, it may be used to describe and analyse what we have previously labelled sensory emplacement (Fors, Bäckström & Pink, 2013; Pink, 2011). The first research project focused on informal learning processes in women skateboarding contexts mainly including unregulated skateboarding, but also contests, skate camps and a skate tour at indoor and outdoor skateparks. Addressing didactic issues of verbal and non verbal expressions of teaching and learning a sensory ethnography approach made bodily un/knowing apparent. The kinesthetic experience of explosiveness, defined as enforcement and transformation of energy, was remembered and also implicitly imagined as part of movement (Bäckström, 2014). For the purpose of this paper data from the first project predominately consist of written field notes, photographs, as well as interview and video transcripts. During the second project, we spent time with the research participants sharing the same computer screen when they used the Internet to gain an appreciation of how they embed these technologies in the routines and habits of their everyday life (Fors, 2013). We were specifically inspired by the notion of how visual experience is part of the multisensory process of moving through the digital, paying attention to “the ways the body is engaged in imagining and remembering” the localities and persons that Internet content represent and there by “move beyond the notion of ‘looking at’ images on a screen” (Pink, 2012:122). The data produced for the analysis presented in this paper consist of interview transcripts, photographs and entries/comments from the photo diaries, and video-recorded interviews during the sessions when the participants guided us through their use of these digital diaries.

    Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or Findings Our analysis made clear that it is possible to deepen our understanding of how learning becomes situated in human practice through identifying alternative and multisensory categories of routes to knowing. In this research, the research participants described their learning experiences through qualities deeply embedded in embodied and emplaced practices. Through a sensory ethnographic approach we identified one specific quality that highlights both embodied and emplaced aspects of learning and may be used to move further sensory emplaced implications on theories of situated learning. We call this quality “känsla”. As mentioned above, this Swedish word includes multiple meanings where feeling, sensation, affect, emotion and style are the most important. Moreover, our analysis shows that “känsla” is a concept that is constituted of multiple aspects of knowing. It engages the senses, it unfolds in the interface between body and the material environment, it engages the body through affect, and it is situated within, and thereby characterized by, distinct social and cultural settings. It is also a concept that becomes evident in both material and digital contexts, and both embodied, emplaced and virtual practices.

    References Ingold, Tim. 2000. The Perception of the Environment: Essays on Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill. London: Routledge. Lave, Jean and Wenger, Etienne. 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Marchand, Trevor. 2007. “Crafting Knowledge: The Role of ‘Parsing and Production of Skill-Based Knowledge among Masons.” In: M. Harris (ed.), Ways of Knowing: New Approaches in the Anthropology of Knowledge and Learning. New York: Berghahn Books. Pink, Sarah. 2009. Doing Sensory Ethnography. London: Sage.

    Intent of Publication This is an original paper which will be submitted to the Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research.

  • 6.
    Cohen, Tom
    et al.
    University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Stilgoe, Jack
    University College London, London, UK.
    Stares, Sally
    City, University of London, London, UK.
    Akyelken, Nihan
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Cavoli, Clemence
    University College London, London, UK.
    Day, Jennie
    Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.
    Dickinson, Janet
    Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Hopkins, Debbie
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Lyons, Glenn
    University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
    Marres, Noortje
    University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Newman, Jonathan
    University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Reardon, Louise
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Sipe, Neil
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Tennant, Chris
    London School of Economics, London, UK.
    Wadud, Zia
    University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Wigley, Edward
    The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
    A constructive role for social science in the development of automated vehicles2020In: Transport Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, ISSN 2590-1982, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated vehicles (AVs) have the potential to cause profound shifts across a wide range of areas of human life, including economic structures, land use, lifestyles and personal well-being. Most current social science on AVs is narrowly framed. Research on public attitudes has focused on whether people are likely to accept and use AVs. We contend that failing to anticipate a wider range of profound social implications may have serious negative consequences, and that social scientists from a range of disciplinary perspectives can provide invaluable insights. Our conclusions are the product of a workshop in London held in 2018 to discuss the place of social science research in relation to the development of AVs. This paper summarises a core selection of our concerns, interests, theoretical and substantive points of reference and aspirations for a constructive role in this field of research and development. © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 7.
    Ebbesson, Esbjörn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Retaining ways of co-creation2023In: ECIS 2023 Research Papers: ECIS 2023, European Conference of Information Systems, Kristianstand, Norway, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design space of future mobility services is considered a wicked problem, as many stakeholders from the public and private sectors need to collaborate to create sustainable future services. Recent years have shown a growing interest in utilizing urban living labs (ULL) and similar quadruple helix approaches toward addressing wicked design challenges. However, when engaging in co-creation through living labs, many actors also see potential in adapting methodology and new ways-of-doing, to appropriate it and improve readiness for tackling other wicked challenges. The article draws upon a ULL initiative in the mobility service context to explore the main challenges for ULL partners to retain the ways-of-doing that develops in co-creation activities. Through our study, we identified that cocreation needs to be grounded in the known, to facilitate search and co-appropriation of the unknown as key for retaining ways-of-doing in ULL initiatives.

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  • 8.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    How can we learn more about youth’s lack of interest in science centres? : A study with a collaborative approach2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do not children in Luleå, Sweden, voluntarily visit the local science centre when they become teenagers? Obviously, in order to study this question the starting-point has to be teenagers’ lives and how the science centre fit into it. This paper focus on how a collaborative approach can give the researcher opportunities to account for the teenagers’ agenda. It is based on a study which provided findings that suggests that the main problem with science centre exhibits from the teenagers’ point of view is the lack of possibilities for personal meaning-making.

  • 9.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    How to use video documentation as more than visual note taking2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There may be different reasons to use video documentation as research method. The study presented in this session takes it starting point in assumptions about the world as experienced; things become visible because of how we see them rather than simply because they are observable. Moreover, those visible elements of experience will be assigned different meanings by different people. These assumptions have implications on the way the video documentation is handled in the discussed study. If reality is not necessarily observable visually, how can we then make use of video documentation as a research method? This question will be handled with examples from a study of teenagers’ relationship to a science centre in Sweden. In this study a video camera is used in order to give agency to the informants to produce an account of the exhibits at the science centre and how they can be used. In this way, the video films become a process by which knowledge is produced. The analysis of the films is especially concerned with the social aspects of the production, content and the process by which the visual image has its meanings re-negotiated.

  • 10.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    ICT use in the flesh: How to academically represent the sensuous work of the human body2011In: Current Issues in European Cultural Studies: ACSIS Conference 2011, Norrköping, 15–17 June 2011, Norrköping: Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (ACSIS), Linköpings universitet , 2011, p. 90-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is stated that the use of ICTs has become integrated as a fundamental part of the infrastructure in contemporary ever-day social life. For instance, new ICT products play a decisive role for the performance of adolescents’ peer-group communication; it has literally become part of a “way of living” (Christensen & Røpke, 2010). In this paper I explore how a sensory ethnographical approach (Pink, 2009) may contribute to interesting perspectives on the construction of this “new normality”. Thinking of use of new media as a kind of work that implies cultural production, i.e. activities that include both consumption and production of web-based user-generated content, gives an opportunity to place the work (agency) of the human body in the nexus of inquiry. The questions I will discuss in this paper originates from research I have done on teenage use of on-line photo diaries; How are our senses attuned toward cultural forms of participation in web-based activities that have turned into routine? How can this kind of sensory data be represented through sequential art?

  • 11.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Knowing Through Numbers: How Corporeal Data Become Life-based Learning Resources2016In: Association for Cultural Studies, Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference 14-17th December, 2016, 2016, p. 90-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how embodied and emplaced learning cultures emerge through the use of self-tracking technologies. The findings are based in interviews with accustomed self-trackers, investigating how the produced corporeal data become part of how they experience and perceive their bodies and their environments. The empirical examples presented in the paper elaborate on the tangibility of these data and how they in their visual and touchable forms afford people to turn their attention toward previously unarticulated and visceral dimensions of embodied learning activities that are part of their everyday life. This includes examples of how people experience both gain and lack of meaning of data in self tracking activities, shifting focus from conceptualising data as ‘knowledge’ per se and instead focus on what and how people learn through their experience of data and how these learning cultures can be understood in a wider pedagogical context.

  • 12.
    Fors, Vaike
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Myten om den tekniskt ointresserade tonåringen2009In: På spaning efter teknisk bildning / [ed] Åke Ingerman, Karin Wagner & Ann-Sofie Axelsson, Stockholm: Liber, 2009, 1, p. 113-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Märit Simonsson: Displaying Spaces. Spatial Design, Experience, and Authenticity in Museums. Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper, Umeå universitet 2014. 206 s., ill. ISBN 978-91-7601-141-6.2015In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 42-44Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Science centrets unika förutsättningar.: - Om att sätta lärandet i sitt sammanhang2003In: Några nedslag i livsvärlden: teori och praktik i pedagogisk forskning / [ed] Eva Alerby & Jan Bengtsson, Luleå: Lueå tekniska universitet , 2003, p. 23-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Sensory experiences of digital photo-sharing: ‘‘mundane frictions’’ and emerging learning strategies2015In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7, article id 28237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies are increasingly ubiquitous in everyday life forming part of the way we live and experience the world. This article will scrutinize how specifically mobile phone cameras, digital photographing and the use of web-based photo-sharing sites and communities become part of the meaning making practices through which the everyday is lived and understood. In doing so, I advance the concept of ‘mundane friction’ through which to discuss the experience, meaning-making and pedagogy generated through operating screen-based technologies. Indeed media participates in everyday worlds beyond its role as a provider of content and for communication. The question that will be addressed here is how this media presence can be understood from an embodied and sensory perspective, and is based in a study of sensory aspects of teenagers use of web-based photo-diaries. Further, this discussion leads to questions of how an appreciation of digital visuality as more than representational acknowledge the meaning of mundane friction caused by habitually touching, rubbing, clicking, pinching through media technologies as part of the sensory emplacement process that establish people as situated learners. In turn, problematizing this tangible friction as pivotal for understanding digital visuality, gives reason to argue for research methods that acknowledge digital visual material as more-than-visual and theory that moves toward the unspoken, tacit and sensory elements of learning in everyday practices. Thus, the aim of this article is to elaborate on the embodied, the methodological and the pedagogical dimensions of ‘mundane friction’ in meaning-making activities, and its pedagogical implications. © 2015 V. Fors.

  • 16.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Shifting perspectives: Learning from or knowing with personal data?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is personal data gathered through body monitoring devices the learning resource it is said to be by its proponents?  If so, are the provided statistics and notifications the “reflective devices” they are meant to be? This presentation will show how people physically get in touch (with their fingers) with their data through touch-screen interfaces in the apps and how these re-enactments are claimed by the users to be “meaningful” when they connect with already existing embodied knowing from participating in the situations registered by the app. These findings suggest that there might be reasons to re-think the cognitive-based epistemological claims to knowledge that flows through talk about learning by reflecting on personal data. It also urges us to consider the implications of bringing in non-representational dimensions of knowing to the fore when discussing the pedagogical impact of personal digital data in everyday lives.

  • 17.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Teenagers’ multisensory routes for learning in the museum: Pedagogical affordances and constraints for dwelling in the museum2013In: The Senses & Society, ISSN 1745-8927, E-ISSN 1745-8935, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 268-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I draw on a study of sensory aspects of teenagers' use of digital media, how these sensory aspects are incorporated in emerging learning strategies, and the implications of this for the same teenagers' engagement in museums. My focus is on how an ethnographic approach that attends to the senses may enable a critical review of prevailing pedagogical ideas in museums. Recent developments in museum education have led to large investments in state-of-the-art technology to produce interactive, multisensory exhibits. However, the question of how teenagers respond to these campaigns remains rather under-researched. This article shows how habitual use of digital media in teenage everyday practice incorporates learning to appropriate other people's experiences and ideas through a configuration of vision, touch, motion, and imagination, thereby enhancing non-representational learning qualities such as affect and sensation. The implications of this sensory approach open up routes to differentiate pedagogical settings in museums that on a superficial level apply the same educational technologies, but since they are based in different sensorial belief systems, different conditions for learning unfold in their use. In developing this analysis I argue that through ethnographic attention to the senses we might advance theories of learning within museum education. © BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLC 2013.

  • 18.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    The empty meeting place: Museum metaphors and their implications for learning2012In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 5, no 1-2, p. 130-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for a need to scrutinize the meeting-place metaphor that is commonly used by museum practitioners, when describing the museum role in society as an informal learning environment. The metaphor indicates that there is an ambition that people should use the museum locality for meetings with others. However, there is no clear direction for what the meetings are for, who is setting up the meetings and around what and based on who’s agenda the desired meetings should be formed. As a means to push this discussion further, i. e what the meeting-place metaphor means, how it is perceived and what it does to how learning environments are designed, the article will re-visit empirical data from a study of how Swedish museum workers verbally give form to what newness in museums may consist of in their museum. The examples from the empirical data is discussed from a theoretical perspective on place as socially produced and occurring as people move through. My contribution question if the meeting-place metaphor as it is conceived by museum practioners is contra-productive to the one single purpose that all museums strive for, to attract a lot of visitors. The central question I am pursuing is if this way of using the meeting-place metaphor is obsolete and if so, what new routes may be taken in finding other metaphors more in line with how the museum can fit into contemporary mediatise society. 

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  • 19.
    Fors, Vaike
    Department of Educational Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    The Missing Link in Learning in Science Centres2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science centres have been identified as an important resource in encouraging teenagers to choose higher education in science and technology. This is of interest to society, since there seems to be a problem in getting sufficient numbers to do so. And accomplishing this is sometimes described as a fatal question for a nation’s future prosperity and development. Still, there is an international trend where teenagers fail to visit science centres.

     

    Through research, little is known about what is interesting or useful to the public, as well as how to reach those who are ‘unengaged’. Considering teenagers as exponents for what distinguishes today’s society makes their apparent unwillingness to participate in science centres interesting to study with regards to what culture, history and ideology these centres were initially produced. Hence, from this point of view, what is missing in science centres that would make them interesting for the young people of today?

     

    Many studies of learning in science centres have come to focus on visitors who visit voluntarily and how well the embedded messages in the exhibits have been acknowledged by these visitors. This study focuses instead on teenagers who are reluctant to participate in science centres, with their perspective of science centres as the point of departure, specifically what kind of social activities are formed in their encounters with science centre exhibits. This encounter is regarded as an encounter between the two different practices of the science centre and the teenagers. The applied theoretical perspective is mainly assembled from socio-cultural theories of learning.

     

    This research is a microanalytic study of five teenagers who were equipped with video cameras and asked to film a visit to the local science centre, Teknikens Hus. The films were later discussed in a focus-group interview consisting of the teenagers and the researcher. Visual ethnography provided the theoretical framework for this research design.

     

    The results showed that the teenagers want to use exhibits to have the authority of interpretations and the possibilities to contribute to the meaning of the activity. At the same time, they want to use the exhibits in a way that the activities become places for developing social identity. To negotiate the meaning of the exhibits there is a need for an openness that may be constrained by too inflexible and limiting exhibit designs. This pattern is described as two different forms of participation in the exhibits; ignoring or extending the intended meaning of the exhibits. Meaningfulness also demands a closeness created by connections between the exhibit and the user’s personal experiences. This pattern is described as two different ways in which the teenagers identified the exhibits; exhibits which they dissociated from or to which they had an ongoing relationship. Providing a space for negotiation seems crucial to inviting teenagers into opportunities of meaningful experiences, even more significant than any specific physical feature in the exhibit.

     

    The teenagers’ agenda, in which forming practices where they can express themselves and contribute to the meaning seem to be very important, appears not to be greatly enabled by science centre exhibits. In this situation they learn to not participate. Science and technology represented in this matter show a ‘ready-made’ world that they cannot change. The missing link in learning in science centres is here described as the part of the meaning making process where the teenagers get to re-negotiate the meaning of the activities in the centre and use the exhibits as tools to accomplish this.

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  • 20.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Tracking down learning: How do self-trackers talk about mundane learning experiences2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will reflect on the preliminary findings from a newly launched project that investigates how the embodied knowledge that emerges through the use of self tracking technologies informs how people experience, perceive their bodies, and imagine and orient their actions towards the futures of their bodies. The first group of participants are collected from a loosely organised group known as Quantified Self, whose members are driven by the idea that collecting and analysing detailed data about their everyday activity can help them improve their lives. The preliminary findings will map and qualitatively analyse the user-produced content on the QS-website in relation to how self-tracking practices in everyday life are accounted for. It will focus on the verbal categories and narratives through which participants discuss their technologies, bodies, and their biographies of self-tracking, specifically when talking about how self-tracking become part of embodied, experiential and mundane learning experiences.

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  • 21.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Young peoples' sense making in museums and virtual reality2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    My research interest lies in investigations of how young people use and make meaning of museums. In former research I have focused on teenagers who do not want to participate in museum activities. In my forthcoming study, I am instead interested in museum settings where they have acknowledged the development of contemporary media and ideas about learning and communication and are said to be successful in engaging young people in their activities. The research questions are what these museum exhibits mean to young people who are accustomed users of new media technology. How do young people engage in meaningful activities and what role does new technology and media play in these learning processes? How do these new learning processes influence young people’s use of museums? In this presentation I will outline the design for the first part of my study, in which I will compare young people’s use of virtual meeting places, like Second Life, MySpace and so forth,  with their use of museum exhibits. The comparison between the use of museums and the use of websites like Second Life may be seen as farfetched. However, there are some similarities, which this research will try to take advantage of. The museums often use sensory metaphors when they give form to their practice. For instance, the World Culture Museum in Gothenburg advises the visitors to “come in and open their senses”. At the same time, this could also be the case for websites like secondlife.com. One of the creators Linden Lab vice-president of product development Cory Ondrejka, explains that “Second Life is intended to be a canvas, rather than a world that constrains residents to a specific theme or style… residents have already created areas with fantasy, sci-fi, dystopian, western and dozens of other themes. Their skills and desires determine how they experience the world, rather than the artificial limits of a typical RPG grind.” This is a description that goes in line with the multi-sensory, emotional and aesthetically driven ideology and discourse often used by the museums when they give form to their practice. When acknowledging the multi-sensory and aesthetic dimensions of the informants’ practice, their actions can also be studied as experiences of perception. However, this does not only imply visual perception. Therefore, I aim to develop a “sensory ethnography” as research method, in order to recognize and acknowledge the multi-sensory and aesthetic dimensions of the studied learning processes. In doing so, video camera will be used by the researcher to conduct video interviews in which the informants shows and talks about their sensory experiences of acting in the different settings. Hence, the websites and exhibits in this project are not to be regarded as merely surfaces to experience visually or texts to be “read”, but as a medium to experience with all your senses.

     

     

  • 22.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Auto-magically there: how co-production workshops are constructed2014In: EASA2014 Collaboration: Intimacy & Revolution – innovation and continuity in an interconnected world: European Association of Social Anthropologists 13th Biennial Conference Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Estonian Institute of Humanities, Tallinn University, Estonia 31st July - 3rd August, 2014, 2014, p. 171-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this paper is to examine the theoretical underpinnings of workshops that are assumed to bridge academia and industry and in doing so toadvance discussions about new modes of knowledge co-production. Workshops between academia and industry are often described as "automagical" sites of knowledge production. This idea needs to be scrutinized. Is it really as simple as if simply "coming together" would make participants to engage in knowledge co-production across academia and industry?  This paper explores the different theoretical perspectives that implicitly underpin the design of the workshops and the expected outcomes. We argue that applied research in the form of workshops should be conceptualized as part of a process of scientific inquiry and learning situated (and therefore conditioned) differently than conventional research within social sciences and humanities. This paper analyses and discusses a specific workshop model called "Innovation Camp" which is organised by a project funded by the municipality in the western part of Sweden to strengthen the specific region as a good environment for living, entrepreneurship and culture. 

  • 23.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö Universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Samproduktionens pedagogik2018In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin berg, Vaike Fors, Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 93-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Cooking for perfection: Transhumanism and the mysteries of kitchen mastery2016In: Confero: Essays on education, philosophy and politics, E-ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 111-135Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 25.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Pink, Sarah
    School of Media and Communication/Design Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Capturing the Ordinary: Imagining the User in Designing Automatic Photographic Lifelogging Technologies2016In: Lifelogging: Digital self-tracking and Lifelogging - between disruptive technology and cultural transformation / [ed] Stefan Selke, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we discuss how automatic wearable cameras are imagined by their designers. Such technologies have most often been approached from a user perspective, which overlooks how developers invest their personal experiences and emotions into the technologies. Focusing on the Narrative clip - a camera that takes a photo every 30 seconds, we show how developers its developers have imagined this camera as a device that enables people to gain access to the assumed authenticity of a recordable world, that exists externally to the human wearing the device. As this example shows, when we account for developers’ visions and imaginations, particular stories emerge. Thus, we argue it is important to account for these and the agency they might have in the possibilities created by automated technologies. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016

  • 26.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Brodersen, Meike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Smith, Rachel Charlotte
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Investigating ADM in Shared Mobility: A design ethnographic approach2022In: Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies / [ed] Sarah Pink; Martin Berg; Deborah Lupton; Minna Ruckenstein, London: Routledge, 2022, 1, p. 197-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how a design ethnographic approach to future algorithm-powered mobility solutions opens up possibilities to research social implications of automated decision making (ADM) from a situational perspective, by investigating the context of ADM rather than simply observing the technology itself and how it is used. The context of our discussion is one where the development of autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence (AI) applications, in the service of transportation, has sparked a renewed research interest into shared mobility systems, and how these can respond to emerging challenges of rising traffic congestion and pollution levels. Our research addresses the gap between algorithm-based approaches to designing for optimizing, streamlining, and efficiency, the questions of how these systems and services are activated in people’s everyday life, and how they interfere with decision-making around traveling and shared mobility. We argue that to understand how these services and technologies will be adopted and implemented in society, research attention must be directed to people in real-life situations where this type of ADM operates.

  • 27.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Gymnastik- och Idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Visuella metoder2015 (ed. 1:1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här boken är att bidra till en ökad användning och utveckling av det visuella i samhällsvetenskapligt forskningsarbete på alla nivåer. Vi har många års erfarenhet av handledning av samhällsvetenskapliga studentarbeten på både grundnivå och avancerad nivå, och vi har kunnat konstatera att visuella metoder inte alls utnyttjas i den utsträckning som skulle kunna vara möjlig. Det märks om inte annat när vi söker i nationella databaser på examensarbeten, kandidatuppsatser och masteruppsatser inom samhällsvetenskapliga områden. Det är ett försvinnande litet antal som anger att de använt sig av visuella metoder. En anledning kan vara att svenska böcker om visuella metoder som vänder sig till en bred publik inom samhällsvetenskaplig kvalitativ forskning är lätt räknade. Det kan också vara så att dessa metoder – om de över huvud taget uppmärksammas i undervisningen och i kurslitteraturen – inte ges samma tyngd som de mer konventionella, som intervjuer, observationer och enkäter. Vi hoppas att denna bok kan medverka till en förändring. Som vi har försökt visa med alla de exempel på forskning som vi presenterar i boken så används visuella metoder ganska flitigt på forskarnivå, och därigenom sker även en hel del experimenterande och utveckling. Och med tanke på den teknologiska och teoretiska utvecklingen i relation till visuella metoder som vi ser framför oss, och som vi också beskriver i boken, så är det ett spännande och dynamiskt fält väl värt att pröva. Kort sagt, med hjälp av visuellt material går det att hitta nya kreativa vägar för att studera och analysera det som samhällsvetenskaplig forskning intresserar sig för. Vi poängterar på flera ställen i den här boken att vår samtid kännetecknas av både ett ökat flöde av bilder (såväl som text) och en snabbare förändringstakt. Vi lever ”flytande liv i en flytande tid”, menar till exempel Zygmunt Bauman (2005). I denna rörliga omvärld med dess ständigt pågående förändringar kan det tyckas svårt att fånga något beskrivbart, och kanske framför allt att hävda någon betydelse som åtminstone delvis är beständig. Därför har vi skrivit fram vad vi menar är av största vikt för att hålla god kvalitet på sin forskning, nämligen att kontextualisera den. Med det menar vi att det är centralt att se till var det empiriska materialet kommer ifrån och hur det har konstruerats. Vi har också poängterat betydelsen av den vetenskapsteoretiska bakgrunden. Detta eftersom den fältforskande ingång som vi står för inte med lätthet kan separera teori och metod. I bokens andra del har vi koncentrerat oss på att ge handfasta förslag på och råd om utformandet av forskningsdesign och genomförandet av själva det empiriska arbetet med visuella metoder. Vår målsättning är att de många exemplen från både svensk och internationell forskning ska inspirera dig som läsare och öka lusten för användning av det visuella i forskningens alla olika faser. Vi avslutar med en framåtblick i bokens sista kapitel: vilka utmaningar står visuella metoder för i dag, och vart kan dessa utmaningar leda oss? Vi har inte försökt göra en metodbok som täcker hela det breda fält som skulle kunna betecknas visuella metoder. Av skäl som framgår i den första delen i boken har vi valt att lägga tyngdpunkten på visuella metoder så som de kan användas i deltagande, fältforskande och etnografiska ansatser. En forskare som återkommer i referenserna och som vi även vill rikta ett personligt tack till är professor Sarah Pink. År 2001 publicerades den första utgåvan av hennes bok Doing visual ethnography. Sedan dess har den kommit ut i flera reviderade upplagor. Genom forskarsamarbeten med professor Pink har vi blivit inspirerade att utforska visuell etnografi och liknande ansatser i vår egen forskning och i skrivandet av den här boken. Det är också på den vägen vi har närmat oss ”sensory ethnograhy” (Pink 2009) eller, som vi skulle vilja kalla det på svenska, tvärsinnlig etnografi. Vi vill också rikta ett särskilt tack till NNDV, Nordic Network for Digital Visuality, för inspirerande arbetsseminarier och konferenser som vi deltagit i de senaste åren, och för ett ekonomiskt stöd som gjorde att vi kunde avsätta ett par dagar till att göra det första utkastet till boken. Ett personligt tack vill vi rikta till projektledaren för detta nätverk, professor Karin Becker, som tagit sig tid att läsa och diskutera våra olika förslag på upplägg och innehåll. Dessa kommentarer och förslag har varit ovärderliga i utformandet av boken. Eventuella felaktigheter i boken ska dock tillskrivas oss själva.

  • 28.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Multisensory Emplaced Learning: Resituating situated learning in a moving world2013In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 170-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines the implications of a theory of "sensory- emplaced learning" for understanding the interrelationships between the embodied and environmental in learning processes. Understanding learning as multisensory and contingent within everyday place-events, this framework analytically describes how people establish themselves as "situated learners." This approach is demonstrated through three examples of how culturally constructed sensory categories offer routes to knowing about the multisensoriality of learning experiences. This approach, we suggest, offers new routes within practice-oriented educational theories for understanding how human bodies become situated and embedded in cultural, social, and material practices within constantly shifting place-events. © 2013 Regents of the University of California on behalf of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition.

  • 29.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Pink, Sarah
    Loughborough University (UK).
    Sensational learning: How sensory experiences give form to places for learning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade academic interest in the senses has increased, indicating what David Howes refers to as a ‘sensual revolution’, a corrective to previous approaches that treat culture as readable text. Following this body of literature, this panel considers the idea of ‘places for learning’ from a perspective that acknowledges the mutlisensoriality of experience. This encompasses not only the directly and more obvious everyday sensoriality of tastes, smells and looks but also, the representations of the senses that saturate magazines, TV and the internet in our highly mediated C21 everyday lives. Studying the multi-sensory and aesthetic dimensions of peoples' learning practices, implies analyzing their actions in terms of experiences of perception – in ways that go beyond a conventional focus on visual perception. Recent ethnographic studies show the importance of sound, smell, taste and touch in how people experience, learn, construct their identities and remember. In this panel we develop these discussions further by exploring how the senses become implicated in contexts where people are engaged in processes of learning. Thus seeking to understand how sensory practices are both implicated in and created in relation to places for learning. In these three presentations we explore the relationship between personal multi-sensorial experiences of looking, tasting and hearing respectively and the collective practices that people engage in when visiting museums, eating and skating.

  • 30.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Fritzdorf, Liselott
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Mutiny! What can happen when the informants take control over the camera?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There may be different reasons to use video documentation as research method. The studies presented in this session both started out with a research design that assumed researcher-controlled video cameras and a search for naturally occurring situations. However, due to different circumstances the cameras were taken over by the informants and some very interesting shifts in perspectives took place. In fact, the produced research material and the video camera itself were assigned new meaning both by the researchers and informants, and provided the research project with different qualities due to the participatory approach. A need for innovation also arose in the analysis of the visual material. In this session we will discuss these shifts of perspectives with examples from our research projects, and what assumptions of the qualities of visual research material that needed to be readdressed during this process. The first research project to be discussed is taking an in-practice perspective investigating a computer game design activity for 7-8 years old and their teachers with the aim to bring clarity to how learning with complex digital tools is constituted within an everyday school activity and how patterns of interaction assume and emerge in such a practice. The second research project involved 15-year old science centre visitors and was concerned with research questions regarding their encounter with interactive science centre exhibits. This will also be related to a third project in which a web-camera is used as a non-human agent in the production of research material.

  • 31.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Pedagogy as Possibility: Health Interventions as Digital Openness2017In: Social Sciences - Socialiniai, ISSN 1392-0758, E-ISSN 2029-7319, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we propose an approach to digital health tracking technologies that draws on design anthropology. This entails re-thinking the pedagogical importance of personal data as lying in how they participate in the constitution of new possibilities that enable people to learn about, and configure, their everyday health in new ways. There have been two dominant strands in traditional debates in the field of pedagogy: one that refers to processes of teaching people to do things in particular ways; and another that seeks to enable learning. The first of these corresponds with existing understandings of self-tracking technologies as either unsuccessful behavioural change devices, or as providing solutions to problems that do not necessarily exist. When seen as such, self-tracking technologies inevitably fail as forms of intervention towards better health. In this article we investigate what happens when we take the second strand—the notion of enabling learning as an incremental and emergent process—seriously as a mode of intervention towards health through self-tracking technologies. We show how such a shift in pedagogical understanding of the routes to knowing these technologies offer creates opportunities to move beyond simplistic ideas of behavioural change as the main application of digital body monitoring in everyday life. In what follows, we first demonstrate how the disjunctures that arise from this context emerge. We then outline a critical response to how learning through life-tracking has been conceptualised in research in health and human-computer interaction research. We offer an alternative response by drawing on a processual theory of learning and recent and emerging research in sociology, media studies, anthropology, and cognate disciplines. Then, drawing on ethnographic research, we argue for understanding learning through the production of personal data as involving emplaced and non-representational routes to knowing. This, we propose, requires a corresponding rethinking of the epistemological status of personal data and what kind of knowledge it can be claimed to produce. Finally, we take up the implications of this and advance the discussion through a design anthropological approach, through which we refigure the interventional potential of such technologies as lying in their capacity to create possibilities for experiential, and often unspoken, ways of embodied and emplaced knowing.

  • 32.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Imagining Personal Data: Experiences of Self-Tracking2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital self-tracking devices and data have become normal elements of everyday life. Imagining Personal Data examines the implications of the rise of body monitoring and digital self-tracking for how we inhabit, experience and imagine our everyday worlds and futures. Through a focus on how it feels to live in environments where data is emergent, present and characterized by a sense of uncertainty, the authors argue for a new interdisciplinary approach to understanding the implications of self-tracking, which attends to its past, present and possible future. Building on social science approaches the book accounts for the concerns of scholars working in design, philosophy and human-computer interaction. It problematizes the body and senses in relation to data and tracking devices, presents an accessible analytical account of the sensory and affective experiences of self-tracking, and questions the status of big data. In doing so, the book proposes an agenda for future research and design that puts people at its centre.

  • 33.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    How do we learn to know a self-driving car?: A pedagogical design anthropology approach to human - technology interaction2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How will autonomous driving (AD) features change how people will relate to, and act in and with cars? To understand these and similar questions, research within human-computer interaction (HCI) is concerned with how people will react and interact with the autonomous driving features while driving a self-driving car, and how these features can be designed to be perceived as both easy to use and useful. In this paper we demonstrate how a pedagogical design anthropological approach can push this agenda further by introducing a way of understanding use of AD that accounts for how technologies become meaningful in the contexts of the mundane everyday life circumstances in which they are actually used. This approach entails understanding use of technology beyond the moment of human-technology interaction, as a process in which experiential ways of knowing take over from rational action, and meaning becomes generated through the ongoing use of technologies in everyday life processes. In the context user experience of AD, this translates into a focus on how people learn to use AD features, and to imagine possible experiences of AD in ways that are situated in the mundane routines of everyday life.

    We will draw on our ethnographic research into everyday life experiences and expectations of AD cars undertaken between 2016-18, to demonstrate how people need these technologies to become part of their everyday lives, and subsequently need to learn to use them in order to accomplish everyday goals.

  • 34.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ruckenstein, Minna
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    QS veterans and the reflexive turn2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Quantified Self movement, advocating self-optimization and behavior change by means of feedback loops, has promoted the idea of ‘self knowledge through numbers’ by relying on the use of self-monitoring devices to obtain bodily and mental evidence that is ‘uncontaminated by interpretation’. However, when interviewing QS veterans from Northen Europe it appears that self knowledge through numbers does not imply to continuously ‘live with numbers’ but also to"live without numbers'. In the QS meetings, presentations are structured around three questions: (1) What did you do? (2) How did you do it? (3) What did you learn? This kind of structure emphasizes the nature of the QS as a learning community, loosely tied up around a shared interest in what learning affordances emerge through the use of body monitoring devices. In this presentation, we describe these affordances, the kind of reflexivity and learning they foster, and how QS veterans engagements in the community has transformed their thinking about measuring and subsequently what they bring with them from these experiences when moving into new contexts. We demonstrate how the QS has been adopted as a new wayto connect and learn, gaining value in relation to the social and communicative processes that it promotes.

  • 35. Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Medialiserade studentlärkulturer – vad lär vi oss av detta?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Något som utmanar lärare idag är studenternas förväntningar på hur de ska kunna använda de lärstrategier de utvecklat i relation till vardagligt användande av kommunikationsteknologier i sina studier. Vilka erfarenheter av att lära och vilka vanemässiga och förkroppsligade sätt att lära har studenterna utvecklat i relation till digitala medier? Hur aktiveras dessa medialiserade “funds of pedagogies” (Zipin, 2009) i högskolemiljön ?

    Det hör kanske till att studenter och högskolelärare har olika uppfattningar om hur högre studier går till, debatten om den låga kunskapsnivån hos studenter har pågått lika länge som det har funnits universitet. Det är heller inget nytt att nya teknologier skapar nya förutsättningar för vad, hur och varför saker ska läras. Frågan vi ställer oss är hur vi genom att öka kunskaper om hur medieberoende sätt att lära kan vara en tillgång i högsolepedagogisk utveckling.

    I en studie av universitetslärare och studenters föreställningar och användning av sociala medier  visade det sig att studenter använde sociala medier i mycket högre grad än lärare, samt att de såg en större potential i att använda dessa som pedagogiska hjälpmedel (Roblyer, et. al. 2010). Frågan om hur dessa skilda föreställningar ser ut och får för konsekvenser föranledde oss att genomföra en granskning av vetenskapliga publikationer med fokus på studentkulturer, sociala medier och högskolestudier (Sjöberg & Fors, kommande). Resultatet av denna granskning är utgångspunkten för vår föreslagna workshop. Vi har sett att det finns en brist av studier som utgår ifrån studenternas medialserade lärkulturer i förståelsen av vad som händer i mötet med högskolevärlden.

    Vår workshop kommer att ha följande upplägg:

    a) Vi presenterar resultatet av vår litteraturgranskning

    b) Följande frågeställningar bearbetas i smågrupper:

    • Vilka medialiserade lärkulturer har vi uppmärksammat att studenterna utvecklar under sina studier? Vilka potentialer resp. problem har vi lärare upplevt med dessa?
    • Hur kan vi utveckla dessa potentialer på konkreta sätt i vår egen undervisning?

    Vi genomför workshopen i en cafémodell där man diskuterar i olika gruppkonstellationer. Målgruppen för denna workshop är högskolepersonal med intresse för medialiseringsprocessens högskolepedagogiska konsekvenser.

    Referenslista

    Roblyer, M. D., McDaniel, M., Webb, M., Herman, J. & Vince Witty, J. (2010). Findings on Facebook in higher education: A comparison of college faculty and student uses and perceptions of social networking sites. Internet and Higher Education, 13, 134-140.

    Zipin, L. (2009). Dark funds of knowledge, deep funds of pedagogy: exploring boundaries between lifeworlds and schools. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, Vol. 30(3), pp. 317-331.

  • 36.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Smith, Rachel Charlotte
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Brodersen, Meike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Re-Framing Ai-driven Futures of the first and last mile of travel: A design ethnographic approach2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss how a design ethnographic approach enables anthropological perspectives to become part of a co-creative multi-stakeholder innovation project across public and private actors. We advocate for a design ethnography that is helpful in imagining, anticipating and realising possible futures by playing in people’s everyday lives rather than playing against technology- and capital-driven innovation agendas (Pink et al. 2022, Smith et al. 2016). Based on a collaborative research and innovation project on future AI-driven mobilities (AHA 2018-2022), we explored the first and last mile of travel that people do when they leave their homes in two diverse suburban communities in southern Sweden. Through empirical examples we will demonstrate how materials from ethnographic fieldwork, in combination with design-oriented multi-stakeholder workshops, were used to co-create insights about what could be worst and best case scenarios for these communities. Through this process we could reframe what is commonly portrayed by both public and private actors as utopian design visions of efficient and individualised mobility, into questionable and contrasting narratives about the fabric of our social lives and decision-making processes in everyday rural and urban communities. We will end with presenting the pedagogical implications of this design ethnographic process - how such reframings can be steered into creating viable co-learning routes for real-life based, ethical and people-centered design opportunities and future transport mobilities.

  • 37.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Stocklmayer, Sue
    The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
    Rennie, Leonie
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Hathayatham, A.
    McCallie, Ellen
    Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, USA.
    Science communication and engagement : Research from four cultures and contexts2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Wagner, Karin
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Svensson, Maria
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Ingerman, Åke
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Hjärnkontoret som teknisk bildningsarena2009In: På spaning efter teknisk bildning / [ed] Åke Ingerman, Karin Wagner & Ann-Sofie Axelsson, Stockholm: Liber, 2009, 1, p. 102-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Glöss, Mareike
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuncer, Sylvaine
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurier, Eric
    University Of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Vinkhuyzen, Erik
    Nissan Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, United States.
    Strömberg, Helena
    Chalmers University Of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    New mobilities: A workshop on mobility beyond the car2020In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings / [ed] A.H Rizvi; K. Morayko, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 3375169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HCI research on mobility and transport has been dominated by a focus on the automobile. Yet urgent environmental concerns, along with new transport technologies, have created an opportunity for new ways of thinking about how we get from A to B. App-based services, innovations in electric motors, along with changing urban transport patterns, are transforming public transit. Technology is creating new collective transit services, as well as new ways for individuals to move, such as through rental, free-floating e-scooters, so called 'micro-mobility'. This workshop seeks to discuss and establish HCI perspectives on these new mobilities - engaging with and even inventing new modes of transport, fostering collaboration between scholars with varied topical interests around mobility. We seek to bring together a group of industry and academic collaborators, bringing new competences to HCI around the exciting opportunities of redesigning our contemporary mobilities. © 2020 Owner/Author.

  • 40.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Experiencing Expectations: Extending the Concept of UX Anticipation2018In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Sune Dueholm Müller & Jeppe Agger Nielsen, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 326, p. 1-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates the role of pre-product user experience (UX) in product design. For automotive companies, questions concerning how users will experience not yet available products is pressing - due to an increase in UX design for products, combined with a decrease in time-to-market for new products. Conventional UX research provides insights through investigating specific situated moments during use, or users’ reflections after use, yet cannot provide knowledge about how users will engage with not yet existing products. To understand pre-product UX we undertook a netnographic study of three people’s experiences of expecting and owning a Tesla car. We identified how modes of anticipation evolve before using the actual car, through online social interaction, creating a pre-product experience. The study offers a foundation for theorizing pre-product UX as socially generated anticipated UX, as well as insights for UX design in industry. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018.

  • 41.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Yuan, Lingxi
    Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    What does it take to make electric charging 'smart'?2023In: 14th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems / [ed] Esko Penttinen; Sampsa Suvivuo; Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen; Matti Rossi; Hadi Ghanbari, 2023, article id 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we argue that the electrification of cars is not simply a move from fossil fuel to electric energy. It also integrates the car into the household energy system in ways that challenge assumptions that car charging is made ‘smart’ primarily through AI-powered app-based digital services that help the user to make energy-, and cost-efficient decisions in terms of when to charge the car. As we will demonstrate in this paper, our design ethnographic study of how nine households learn to charge their cars according to their family routines and values shows how smart charging is not merely due to specific technological features. Instead, charging habits evolve through anticipatory experiences of what smart technologies come to mean to family members through their use. Based on our research, we recommend a smart charging service design that affords multi-operation ability, co-learning ability and social accessibility.

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  • 42.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. UX Vision, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Pink, Sarah
    Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculties of Information Technology and Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Entangled Intelligent Driving: Relations with Automated Cars2022In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 38, no 17, p. 1607-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As machines become increasingly intelligent, the HCI community is presented with new challenges regarding methods to capture and understand user experience (UX). In the case of autonomous driving (AD), this involves new scenarios where humans and intelligent vehicles need to act together in real-life traffic situations with other road users. This article responds to this context by 1) outlining a longitudinal design ethnography method whereby participants drove semiautonomous cars in their everyday environments to capture such human-machine relations in real-life settings, 2) demonstrating the complexities of the relations between humans and AD vehicles, 3) engaging theories of socio-materiality and entanglement to understand the human-machine relations of AD cars, and 4) identifying anticipatory experiences that emerge from these relations and their implications for informing UX design. © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 43.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Experiencing the Future Car: Anticipatory UX as a Social and Digital Phenomenon2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 31, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to be innovative and competitive, the automotive industry seeks to understand how to attract new customers, even before they have experienced the product. User Experience (UX) research often provides insights into situated uses of products, and reflections after their use, however tells us little about how products and services are experienced before use. We propose anticipation theory as a way to understand how shared experiences between people in an online discussion forum relate to UX of cars before they are actually experienced in real-life. We took an ethnographic approach to analyse the activities of members of a self-organised web-based discussion forum for Tesla car enthusiasts, to understand how product anticipation emerges in a digital-material setting. Our study identifies how anticipatory experiences create UX of car ownership which evolves through members’ engagement in a self-organised online community enabled through the digitalisation and connectivity of the car, and how such car experiences generate new forms of digital anticipation of the car. We conclude that the shift towards digitalisation of cars and subscription services creates a need for more interdisciplinary research into spatial and temporal aspects, where socially shared anticipatory experiences are increasingly important for the overall UX. © Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems,.

  • 44.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    RMIT University Melbourne, Australia.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University Malmö, Sweden.
    On the way to anticipated car UX2018In: NordiCHI'18: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, New York: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 494-504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional User Experience (UX) research provides insights into situated uses of products, or reflections after their use, but tells us little about how products are experienced before use. In this article we demonstrate how people's engagement in web-based discussion forums creates ways through which they can experience products before they have actually used them, and reflect on the implications of this for UX research. To understand how product anticipation emerges in a digital-material setting we undertook an ethnographic analysis of members' contributions to http://www.teslaclubsweden.se, a web-based discussion forum that connects Tesla car enthusiasts. Anticipation developed as a shared endeavour that evolved through five ways which forum members engaged and participated in their community of practice. Through their online interactions their UX evolved before using the actual car. Our findings provide deeper understandings of anticipatory UX, and insights for UX design in HCI. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery

  • 45.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anticipatory experience in everyday autonomous driving2020In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 24, p. 747-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss how people’s user experience (UX) of autonomous driving (AD) cars can be understood as a shifting anticipatory experience, as people experience degrees of AD through evolving advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) in their everyday context.We draw on our ethnographic studies of five families, who had access to AD research cars with evolving ADAS features in their everyday lives for a duration of 1ó years. Our analysis shows that people gradually adopt AD cars, through a process that involves anticipating if they can trust them, what the ADAS features will do and what the longer-term technological possibilities will be. It also showed that this anticipatory UX occurs within specific socio-technical and environmental circumstances, which could not be captured easily in experimental settings. The implication is that studying anticipation offers us new insights into how people adopt AD in their everyday commute driving. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 46.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, UX Vision, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Faculty of Information Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Fore-sighting autonomous driving - An Ethnographic approach2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 173, article id 121105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of Human-Computer-Interaction research and the automotive industry has identified that un- derstanding user needs and creating positive user experience (UX) is crucial in order to successfully introduce Autonomous Driving (AD) vehicles to the market. AD research is commonly undertaken to provide user insights by studying the individual-technology experiences in lab settings or by forecasting attitudes and acceptability through large surveys. However, these approaches base their knowledge on people’s past or present expectations and limited real life experiences of AD. To better understand upcoming individual user needs and to enable new innovations beyond acceptability forecasts and UX lab tests, we need to identify new concepts through alter- native methodologies that can generate user foresights based on users’ evolving anticipations of AD in their everyday lives. We propose an ethnographic approach with iterative speculative scenarios, which we demon- strate through a study undertaken with participants from five families who were introduced to evolving levels of AD, in real-life situations. To demonstrate the methodology, we draw on empirical findings which reveal anticipatory experiences, which we abstract through the concepts of confidence, hope and being-in-the-moment. We show how these concepts structured our user foresights, and outline the implications of engaging them in innovation processes.

  • 47.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Long, Vicky
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Cooney, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Duarte, Eduardo K.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Aksoy, Eren Erdal
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Vinel, Alexey
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Dougherty, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Smaller is smarter: A case for small to medium-sized smart cities2022In: Journal of Smart Cities and Society, ISSN 2772-3577, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 95-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart Cities have been around as a concept for quite some time. However, most examples of Smart Cities (SCs) originate from megacities (MCs), despite the fact that most people live in Small and Medium-sized Cities (SMCs). This paper addresses the contextual setting for smart cities from the perspective of such small and medium-sized cities. It starts with an overview of the current trends in the research and development of SCs, highlighting the current bias and the challenges it brings. We follow with a few concrete examples of projects which introduced some form of “smartness” in the small and medium cities context, explaining what influence said context had and what specific effects did it lead to. Building on those experiences, we summarise the current understanding of Smart Cities, with a focus on its multi-faceted (e.g., smart economy, smart people, smart governance, smart mobility, smart environment and smart living) nature; we describe mainstream publications and highlight the bias towards large and very large cities (sometimes even subconscious); give examples of (often implicit) assumptions deriving from this bias; finally, we define the need of contextualising SCs also for small and medium-sized cities. The aim of this paper is to establish and strengthen the discourse on the need for SMCs perspective in Smart Cities literature. We hope to provide an initial formulation of the problem, mainly focusing on the unique needs and the specific requirements. We expect that the three example cases describing the effects of applying new solutions and studying SC on small and medium-sized cities, together with the lessons learnt from these experiences, will encourage more research to consider SMCs perspective. To this end, the current paper aims to justify the need for this under-studied perspective, as well as to propose interesting challenges faced by SMCs that can serve as initial directions of such research.

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  • 48.
    Osz, Katalin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Raats, Kaspar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Monash university, Melbourne, Australia.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Combining WOz testing and ride along video ethnographies: advancing methodologies for Autonomous Driving car development for mixed traffic environments2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Australian Conference on Computer-Human Interaction, New York: ACM Press, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental ‘Wizard of Oz’ (WOz) User Experience (UX) research in the context of Autonomous Driving (AD) car development is becoming more interdisciplinary, human-centric and open to innovative methodological collaborations. In this paper, we demonstrate a mixed-methodological approach to research how people engage with and make sense of automated features that do not yet exist in everyday life contexts. We present how the combination of WOz testing and ethnographic ride-alongs have been developed and how the two different approaches can benefit from each other. We selected two everyday driving examples - emerging from T-junction and changing lane on the motorway - to demonstrate the value of mixing these methodologies. We propose that by building new collaborative test practices, we can create a more everyday-life oriented approach that better attends to people’s experiences, imaginaries and projections into possible futures of driving, which is particularly important to incorporate in AD vehicle design for mixed traffic environments.

  • 49.
    Osz, Katalin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydström, Annie
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Informat Technology, Monash Art Design & Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Broström, Robert
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Building Collaborative Test Practices: Design Ethnography and WOz in Autonomous Driving Research2018In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 37, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a novel way of performing experimental "Wizard of Oz" (WOz) User Experience (UX) research that specifically targets driving in different levels of self-driving modes. The reasons for exploring the possibilities of combining experimental and ethnographic WOz-testing have been twofold. On the one hand, this mixed-method approach responds to a growing body of critique concerning how the WOz test is biased by the claim that it explores real-life behaviour in an experimental setting. On the other hand, our approach also meets the demands for innovative research methodologies that can contribute to deeper understandings of how to better evaluate and account for human expectations and experiences when automated technologies become integrated in everyday life contexts. This knowledge is inevitable for a broader understanding of the overall user experience and expectations of autonomous driving and, more specifically, building an interdisciplinary collaborative testing approach.

  • 50.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Being in a mediated world: self-tracking and the mind–body–environment2017In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 375-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-tracking is an increasingly ubiquitous everyday activity and therefore is becoming implicated in the ways that everyday environments are experienced and configured. In this article, we examine theoretically and ethnographically how the digital materiality of these technologies mediates and participates in the constitution of people’s tacit ways of being in the world. We argue that accounting for the presence of such technologies as part of everyday environments in this way offers new insights for non-representational accounts of everyday life as developed in geography and anthropology and advances existing understandings of these technologies as it has emerged in sociology and media studies.

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