hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Berglund, Johan
    et al.
    Jonsson, Per
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Measuring strategies for smooth tool steel surfaces2008In: Proceedings: January 28th and 29th, 2008, Germany, Chemnitz = XII. Internationales Oberflächenkolloquium, Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2008, p. 110-119Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparisons between different measuring strategies were made on three types of smooth tool steel surfaces. Three replica materials were tested to study possibilities within replication techniques. An optical interferometer as well as a mechanical stylus was used to evaluate the surfaces. The results showed that the tested replica materials generated good representations of both the form and the surface roughness (Sq > 300 nm). The evaluated surfaces were quite homogeneous, thus, few measurements are needed to get representative results. However, it was found that caution must be taken regarding manually polished surfaces which can be less homogenous and therefore require more measurements to get representative results.

  • 2.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Kofod, Guggi
    InMold Biosystems, Farum & Høje-Taastrup, Denmark.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Evaluation of Durability of SOG-layers on Steel Surfaces by Wear and Scratch Tests2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Steel moulds with high precision surfaces are being used in various branches. Process aspects, like tool life and tribological properties, as well as design issues are of great importance. This work summarises experimental studies performed to test durability properties of SOG (spin-on-glass)-layers on steel surfaces. This coating technique is based on a newly developed method for surface preparation of tools which has been demonstrated to be durable for more than 66.000 replications in injection moulding processes without loss of surface fidelity. The procedure allows surface roughness reduction from approximately 200 nm Ra down to some few nm for high gloss applications, as well as easy transfer of large-area functional nanostructures on complex 3D surfaces.

    Three different types of surfaces were investigated: SOG-layered metal surfaces with three different layer thicknesses, one ingot casted and one electro slag remelted material (with hardness level of 950 and 2500 MPa, respectively). The metal surfaces were ground and polished to mirrorlike finishes.

    Three circular samples of each type were rubbed against a hard steel ball of 6.35 mm radius on a commercial pin-on-disk tribometer. To resemble the molding process a sliding speed of 2 mm/s and a load of 8 N were chosen. The tests were performed with 5 minutes intervals until the first damage on the surface were observed. In parallel, scratch tests were performed in the same tribometer. The surfaces were measured in-situ by a portable microscope and a stylus, and afterwards by a white light interferometer and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the size of the wear/scratch traces.

    The surface type with the longest time to damage and/or smallest wear/scratch traces was considered to be the most durable one.

  • 3.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    On Polishability of Tool Steels2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the world’s fastest growing industries is the plastic industry. Today’s ever increasing demands of high quality products, shorter lead times and reduced costs push development and research forwards. Moulds for plastic injection moulding need to have a functional surface to meet demands on demoulding and wear properties, but also to produce the required final surface quality, which for ‘standard mould qualities’ of high gloss applications means nearly defect free, shiny and smooth mould surfaces with roughness levels in the nm-range.

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a metrology framework to quantitatively characterise these mould surfaces in order to gain better understanding of which defect structures are critical at injection moulding, and how these are correlated to material properties and operating conditions in surface preparation of tool steels. In practice this means to capture surface features of some few nm in height/depth up to some hundreds of microns in lateral dimension within insert areas of cm2 and larger. Experiments combining polishers’ experience with steel producers’ as well as non-contact areal texture examinations of surface topography were performed to overcome and link practical skills to academic ones.

    Based on areal surface metrology, defect classification and image analysis based surface characterisation, an evaluation procedure for polished tool steel surfaces was developed, initially tested and verified. The suggested method involves descriptions of relevant defect structures and acceptance levels for high gloss polished tool steels in the form of numerical parameter values based on interferometric measurements. It was also concluded that the cleanness of the steels was less important as long as it was kept within reasonable levels; the surface preparation strategy is a major factor influencing the mould surface quality e.g. it was found that a ‘several-step-strategy’ was favourable to avoid defect structures; not all ‘mirror-like’ mould surfaces had desirable topographies for injection moulding, therefore a well-defined mould surface assessment with numerical values describing mould surface quality is necessary to secure effective mould surfaces.

  • 4.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Polishability of tool steels: Characterisation of high gloss polished tool steels2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing of plastic components, like a majority of other mass produced discrete parts, require well designed dies and moulds. Complex geometries and increasing demands on final surface appearance, which is strongly connected to the quality impression, are pushing for high demands on mould-makers and polishers as well as steel producers. Moulds for production of shiny plastic components require tool steels with low defect levels to achieve highly gloss and very smooth mould surfaces (roughness levels in the nm-range).

    It is the ability to achieve those mirror-like surfaces, the polishability of tool steels, that is the central part in this study. To increase the understanding of how material properties and different surface preparation techniques impact the polishability, a selection of high gloss polished tool steel qualities were characterised using non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis.

    A first step towards a grading system of the polishablility was made based on a classification of surface defects detected on included steel samples. 3D surface parameters based on interferometer measurements seemed to be useful for a characterisation, even though further studies (involving different filters and segmentation methods) are needed to find less and more precise parameter values to grade tool steel qualities.

    Future work will include analysis of surface measurements of test moulds and plastic parts, as well as studies of how quantitative parameters can be linked to qualitative estimations in order to better understand how surface features on the mould are transferred into the surface of plastic components.

  • 5.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Behrens, Barbara
    Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology, Department Process Technology, Aachen, Germany.
    Klocke, Fritz
    Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology, Department Process Technology, Aachen, Germany.
    Zunke, Richard
    Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology, Department Process Technology, Aachen, Germany.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Towards robust polishing strategies for moulds and dies2009In: Proceedings of the 3rd Swedish Production Symposium, Göteborg, Sweden, 2-3 December 2009 (SPS09), Swedish Production Academy , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarises several experiments performed in order to increase the knowledge about the polishing process (e.g. to better understand the origins of different defect structures) and to develop new polishing strategies for dies and moulds with high demands on surface quality, i.e. glossy and ‘defect free’ surfaces. The polishing strategies are not only a help to avoid unwanted surface structures, they will also work as the base for automated polishing systems, which have several advantages compared to manual polishing; vibrating hand tools and monotonic work can be avoided, dust and noise levels as well as total process time can be reduced, and more consistent surface finishes from tool to tool can be achieved.

    A selection of steel samples, polished with different techniques, were analysed to study how the final surface quality was influenced by e.g. the process route, the degree of purity and the microstructure. The surface quality was here represented by roughness values and SEM-images. It could be concluded that the degree of homogeneity and the purity level of the steel materials were crucial to final surface qualities; the lower amount of inclusions, the better the surface quality. Further, a classification of occurred defect structures made.

  • 6.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Kofod, Guggi
    InMold Biosystems, Taastrup, Denmark.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Empirical Evaluation of Spin-on-Glass-Layers on Steel Surfaces by Wear Tests2014In: Tribologia Finnish Journal of Tribology, ISSN 0780-2285, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dies and moulds with high precision surfaces are being used in various branches, e.g. in the plastic industry where the surface finish are conventionally performed by manual polishers. With ever increasing demands of shorter lead times and reduced costs, efforts have been made to automate this finishing process. This paper presents an empirical study performed to test durability properties of SOG (spin-on-glass)-layers on steel surfaces. The results showed that the thin coating last longer than the thicker ones, and that the harder coatings withstood wear significantly better than the steel reference samples thus motivating further investigations.

  • 7.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Traceology for polishing process control2014In: Conference Proceedings - 14th International Conference of the European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2014 / [ed] R. Leach, Bedford: EUSPEN , 2014, Vol. 1, p. 217-220Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Final finishing operations of dies and moulds e.g. in the plastic industry, are conventionally performed by manual polishers. With ever increasing demands of shorter lead times and reduced costs, efforts have been made to automate the finishing process. This paper presents the first step towards a built-in surface inspection system for automated polishing processes, designed to indicate when it is time to shift from one preparation step to the next one. It is based on an evaluation procedure for mirror-like steel surfaces, and a characterisation method used to study scratch patterns on cylinder liner surfaces. This method was further developed/adapted to polished steel surfaces. The results showed that scratch width and height were strong indicators for surface quality evaluation.

  • 8.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Flemming, Leigh
    Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Blunt, Liam
    Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    A Training Consortium to Explore and Exploit Surface Metrology2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of surface finish in all aspects of manufacturing influences economic considerations as well as environmental aspects and functionality. The ability to effective and efficient characterise surface topography is an important tool in the manufacturers arsenal which is often overlooked or underutilised. By providing a comprehensive, affordable training package, a gap in the industrial knowledge is filled giving manufacturers the ability to increase their competitive edge.

  • 9.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    A quantitative method to estimate high gloss polished tool steel surfaces2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces: 12 – 15 April 2011, Twickenham Stadium, UK / [ed] Richard Leach & Liam Blunt, Teddington: National Physical Laboratory , 2011, p. 35-39Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual estimations are today the most common way to assess the surface quality of moulds and dies; a method that are both subjective and, with today’s high demands on surfaces, hardly usable to distinguish between the finest surface qualities. Instead a method based on non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis is suggested. Several types of tool steel samples, manually as well as machine polished, were analysed to study different types of surface defects such as pitting, orange peel and outwardly features. The classification of the defect structures serves as a catalogue where known defects are described. Suggestions of different levels of ‘high surface quality’ defined in numerical values adapted to high gloss polished tool steel surfaces are presented. The final goal is to develop a new manual that can work as a ‘standard’ for estimations of tool steel surfaces for steel producers, mould makers, polishers etc.

  • 10.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    A Step-by-Step Analysis of Manual Polishing Sequences2012In: Proceedings of the 9th International Tooling Conference / [ed] Harald Leitner, Regina Kranz, Angelika Tremmel, 2012, p. 317-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polishing of tool steels for e.g. injection moulding of plastic parts or direct polishing of products is perhaps the most important industrial finishing process today. Polishing is often made manually to ensure the highest quality and nanometre roughness. This study compare steel samples prepared in different companies to study how different polishing sequences affect final surface qualities, i.e. trying to find crucial factors controlling high gloss appearance and defect levels. The samples were prepared in a way that every step of the polishing process could be studied quantitatively at nanometre level using phase shifting- and coherence scanning interferometry. In addition, all samples were qualitatively documented and judged visually by the polishers themselves. It could be concluded that a ‘several-step’ strategy in combination with short polishing time was advantageous. Also, guidelines for tool and abrasive selection is presented suggesting cotton as carrier and diamonds of 1 µm size for more time efficient final polishing.

  • 11.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Evaluation of a robot assisted polishing equipment2008In: Proceedings (CD) of the 2nd Swedish Production Symposium; Stockholm, Sweden, 2008, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on several tests of a robot assisted polishing equipment, the Strecon RAP-200, which was recently developed by Strecon A/S in purpose to polish punches and dies for metal forming. The main part of the study was a 4-factor 2-level design of experiment, where the influence of pressure, pulse, repetitions and linear speed on the final surfaces were studied with help of both a mechanical stylus and an interferometer.

    The number of repetitions seemed to be the main factor affecting the final surface quality, but also the rotation speed seemed to affect the surface roughness. Further evaluations will be performed in the forthcoming three years.

  • 12.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Factors influencing the surface quality of polished tool steels2014In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 035004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s demands on surface quality of moulds for injection moulding of plastic components involve no/low defect contents and roughness levels in the nm-range for high gloss applications. Material properties as well as operating conditions influence the mould finish, and thus the final surface of moulded products. This paper focuses on how particle content and different polishing strategies influence final surface qualities of moulds. Visual estimations of polished tool steel samples were combined with non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis in order to correlate traditional assessments to more quantitative methods, and to be able to analyse the surfaces at nanometer-level.

    It was found that steels with a lower proportion of particles, like carbides and oxides, gave rise to smoother polished surfaces. In a comparative study of polishers from different polishing shops, it was found that while different surface preparation strategies can lead to similar final roughness, similar preparation techniques can produce high-quality surfaces from different steel grades. However, the non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis showed that not all smooth polished surfaces have desirable functional topographies for injection moulding of glossy plastic components.

  • 13.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    High gloss polishing of tool steels – step by step2011In: Proceedings of The 4th International Swedish Production Symposium / [ed] J.-E. Ståhl, 2011, p. 257-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface preparation of moulds for high gloss applications, e.g. tools for injection moulding of plastic parts, is still a relatively unknown area. Most knowledge is accumulated by individual polishers with long experience in the field. Literature covering the polishing process/mechanisms is rare and it becomes harder and harder to recruit new skilled polishers. Today it is also a matter of time, and cost; how long time is needed to prepare a new mould? How many steps are needed? Which tools? Is it possible to replace the manual polishers by robots?

    This article is part of a study where equivalent steel samples were prepared in different polishing shops to investigate the surface quality achieved in every step of the process. The polishers have documented their processes and comment on the final results. The main goal was to study how different proceedings affect the final surface quality; which are the crucial factors in order to achieve a high gloss polished surface with low defect levels?

    The sample analysis is based on visual estimations as well as interferometer measurements and belonging surface parameters; e.g. seems the number of preparation steps be crucial to the final surface quality.

  • 14.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Quantitative evaluation of the surface finish of high gloss polished tool steels2014In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 014002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardized procedures to measure and estimate surface qualities of moulds for injection moulding of plastic components do not exist. Instead, steel producers as well as polishers and mould-users need to rely on master plaques for tactile comparisons and/or their own visual estimations for surface quality controls. This paper presents an overview of various surface evaluation methods of steels, including existing standards and available surface metrology. A new method to evaluate high gloss polished tool steel surfaces, based on a three-dimensional non-contacting measurement technique, is presented. The suggested method is based on defect extraction, and should be useful for both specifications and quality controls. Included defects were found to be quality criteria for polished tool steel surfaces. The surface acceptance levels and defect classification are based on interviews and questionnaires, as well as literature studies and visual estimations of test samples made by experienced polishers. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 15.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Quantitative evaluation of the surface finish of high gloss polished tool steels2013In: Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces, 2013: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, June 17-21, 2013, 2013, p. 207-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardised procedures to measure and estimate surface qualities of moulds for injection moulding of plastic components do not exist. Instead, steel producers as well as polishers and mould-users need to rely on master plaques for tactile comparisons and/or their own visual estimations for surface quality controls.

    This paper presents an overview of various surface evaluation methods of steels, including existing standards and available surface metrology. A new method to evaluate high gloss polished tool steel surfaces, based on a 3D non-contacting measurement technique, is presented. The suggested method is based on defect extraction, and should be useful for both specifications and quality controls. Included defects were found to be quality criteria for polished tool steel surfaces. The surface acceptance levels and defect classification are based on interviews and questionnaires, as well as literature studies and visual estimations of test samples made by experienced polishers.

  • 16.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    A quantitative method to estimate high gloss polished tool steel surfaces2011In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 311, no 1, article id 012004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual estimations are today the most common way to assess the surface quality of moulds and dies; a method that are both subjective and, with today’s high demands on surfaces, hardly usable to distinguish between the finest surface qualities. Instead a method based on non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis is suggested. Several types of tool steel samples, manually as well as machine polished, were analysed to study different types of surface defects such as pitting, orange peel and outwardly features. The classification of the defect structures serves as a catalogue where known defects are described. Suggestions of different levels of ‘high surface quality’ defined in numerical values adapted to high gloss polished tool steel surfaces are presented. The final goal is to develop a new manual that can work as a ‘standard’ for estimations of tool steel surfaces for steel producers, mould makers, polishers etc.

  • 17.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholm Tooling AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    Polished injection moulds’ and surface defects’ influence on the quality of plastic components2009In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces / [ed] P. Pawlus, L. Blunt, B.-G. Rosén, T. Thomas, M. Wieczorowski, H. Zahouani, Rzeszów: Rzeszów University of Technology , 2009, p. 396-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of injection mould surfaces is important as it has a major influence on tool performance. In the specific field of plastic moulding, many products require defect free, glossy, and very smooth mould surfaces (roughness parameters in the nm-range) to achieve a satisfactory surface appearance. The surface quality is also crucial for the mould to function properly in the actual tooling application; too rough surfaces might disturb the flow of the polymer melt and increase wear, while too smooth surfaces give rise to sticking problems.

     

    A key factor towards improved tool performance is the development of a metrology framework to characterise the polished surfaces. This paper summarises a study based on a non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis, where tool steel moulds and injection moulded plastic components are characterised in terms of surface quality. Different types of defects, such as non-metallic inclusions and carbides, are studied in more detail to better understand their effect on final plastic component surfaces. Critical defect size?, Types of defects? and Defect distribution? are typical questions at issue. A test mould with intentional manufactured pores and scratches in different sizes and distributions will be designed and verified in order to enable injection mould industry to optimize selection of polymer and process variables with respect to plastic component surface quality and tool material selection.

  • 18.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    Surface characterisation of high gloss polished tool steels2009In: Proceedings of the 8th International Tooling Conference: TOOL 09: Tool Steels – Deciding Factor in Worldwide Production: RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, June 2–4, 2009: Volume II / [ed] P. Beiss, C. Broeckmann, S. Franke & B. Keysselitz, Aachen: Mainz , 2009, p. 953-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that high quality tool steels, i.e. steels possessing low contents of defect structures, and the adoption of well developed polishing techniques are required to get satisfactory mould surfaces for plastic forming. However, there is still a lack of knowledge concerning how different defect structures on mould surfaces affect final plastic components, and how tool steel surfaces can be measured and analysed in convenient ways.

    Based on non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis, three test moulds and corresponding injection moulded plastic plaques were characterised with the objective to study how defect structures on the mould surfaces were transferred into the final plastic components.

    Surface structures, remaining scratches and to a certain extent pin-holes originated from the mould surface were all detected on the surface of the plastic components. However, more extensive studies need to be performed in order to understand why different defect structures on tool steels occur, how they can be avoided and, for different plastic products, which the critical limits are (in terms of amount, shape and size of the defects).

  • 19.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Tool steel polishing and topography characterization2007In: The Swedish Production Symposium in Göteborg 28-30 August 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual polishing is a common method to accomplish a mirror-like mould surface, although it is a cumbersome and time-consuming process. It is, thus, of great interest within the industry to find faster and better polishing techniques to decrease the costs and lead times. A key factor towards improved polishing techniques is to find ways to characterize polished surfaces; which parameters and instruments can be used and what is the definition of polishability? This paper summarises a study where three steel grades were analysed with five different measuring devices. The results showed that mechanical stylus instrumentations are not enough to describe very smooth surfaces, but measurement devices with better resolution are needed, such as interferometers.

  • 20.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Wagner, Michael
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Mazal, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Dahlén, Malin
    Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Detection of paint polishing defects2018In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 024009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface finish plays a major role on perceived product quality, and is the first thing a potential buyer sees. Today end-of-line repairs of the body of cars and trucks are inevitably to secure required surface quality. Defects that occur in the paint shop, like dust particles, are eliminated by manual sanding/polishing which lead to other types of defects when the last polishing step is not performed correctly or not fully completed. One of those defects is known as 'polishing roses' or holograms, which are incredibly hard to detect in artificial light but are clearly visible in sunlight.

    This paper will present the first tests with a measurement set-up newly developed to measure and analyse polishing roses. The results showed good correlations to human visual evaluations where repaired panels were estimated based on the defects' intensity, severity and viewing angle.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf