hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 45 of 45
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Florén, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Managerial behavior and small firm's internationalization2005In: McGill Conference on international entrepreneurship, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The relationship between the manager and growth in small firms2009In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 586-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the relationship between the manager and growth in small firms, through a review of earlier research.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A review of articles published during the last 25 years is carried out in order to answer the question: How does the top manager influence growth in small firms?

    Findings

    Three key relationships are identified: between growth and, respectively, managerial traits and characteristics, managerial intentions, and managerial behavior or roles. The diverse findings in the literature are contradictory and give a paradoxical picture of the impact of the manager. A deeper analysis of the results from the review, supplemented with leadership theory, yields a better understanding of small-firm growth with a special focus on the behavior of the manager.

    Research limitations/implications

    This paper problematizes the complexity in managing small-firm growth, and can be further empirically validated by using multiple methods including qualitative ones such as observational studies.

    Practical implications

    The findings have a bearing on education and policy implications. If a behavior can be identified that promotes small firms' growth, education and policy implications can be developed in line with these results.

    Originality/value

    In small firms there seems to be a general consensus that managers do influence the performance of small firms, but so far there has not been a systematic review of earlier empirical research, that is done in this paper. From this review, a more complete picture of how managers influence growth in small firms is presented.

  • 3.
    Brundin, Ethel
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Florén, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The behavioral complexity of small firm entrepreneurs and the relation to firm performance: A framework2007In: Proceedings of the 4th International AGSE Entrepreneurship Research Exchange / [ed] L. Murray Gillin, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Chhotray, Soma
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Sivertsson, Olof
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The Roles of Leadership, Vision, and Empowerment in Born Global Companies2018In: Journal of International Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1570-7385, E-ISSN 1573-7349, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 38-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the roles of leadership, vision, and empowerment in two Swedish born global companies. Using case studies and interviews with employees and managers, the article examines how managers can lead their companies by creating a vision and empowering their employees. The findings indicate that a company vision should reflect a culture that supports the employees’ daily activities and decisions. A leadership style that features delegation of responsibility and recognition of employee work autonomy empowers employees in a way that can advance the development and internationalization of the born global company, especially in situations when top managers are often away from company headquarters. © 2017 The Author(s)

  • 5.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    A Review of the Literature on Learning and SMEs2002In: The SEAANZ Conference, 22nd-24th September 2002, Adelaide, Australia, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Key learning themes in the small-business literature2003In: Small Enterprise Research: The Journal of SEAANZ, ISSN 1321-5906, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a review of the literature on learning in small businesses. The sources for the review are two major databases on management research: Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and ABI/INFORM (ABI). In all, about 500 abstracts published between 1973 and 2002 have been classified. The review shows that research still is built on primary empirical research and that there are no obvious core groups of researchers publishing in the field. Our review does, however, identify a general trend pointing towards an increasing interest in research on learning in small businesses. Further, it is shown that key learning themes discussed during the last 30 years related to small businesses are: education and training (of both management and employees), strategic planning and IT/Software support. During the last decade, the interest in inter-organizational learning (networks and clusters) has increased dramatically. The review indicates that research on small businesses and learning is multidisciplinary and in an early stage of its growth. An in extenso analysis, of all articles in the five most prominent journals found in the review, shows few signs of coherent bodies of knowledge on which the literature draws. Many of the articles (37%) give no accounts of explicit theory. This is the case particularly in the early publications. The review does not reveal any 'original' theory generated by the small-business research community. Instead theories are extracted from other academic disciplines, mainly from the field of economics but also from other social sciences such as sociology and psychology and from engineering. The review shows that empirical studies of learning in small businesses are rare. This means that our understanding of learning processes in this kind of organisations is limited. Research is necessary to increase our knowledge of learning in different levels but also from different perspectives in small firms. The 'small-firm effect' on learning needs to be further explored.

  • 7.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial behavior in slow and fast growing small firms2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the paper is to fill a gap in our understanding of what makes certain small firms grow while others do not by exploring the relation between managerial behavior and small firm growth. This has been done by direct observation of the owner‐managers in twelve small manufacturing firms (six slow‐growing and six fast‐growing). Methodologically the project draws on the extensive research that has been conducted within the area of mana‐ gerial work. We have used the method of structured observation as developed by Henry Mintzberg as the primary tool for data collection. Data consists of approximately 330 hours of observation and about 2460 activities have been observed and classified according to their primary purpose.The framework used to analyze the data comes from established conceptualizations of “ma‐ nagerial behavior”. More specifically, the two groups of managers have been compared in terms of; how the managers’ allocate their time; with whom they interact; with whom do they communicate; and the roles they shoulder in their firms.What is both striking and surprising in the empirical material is that there are only minor dif‐ ferences between the groups of growing and slow‐growing firms. These differences, however, all point in the same direction and confirm one suspicion following our observations of the two groups which is that the hectic and turbulent work situation characterizing the situation of the slow‐growing managers were not present in the growing firms. There might not seem to be such a big difference between the two groups, but trivial questions consumes much of the time for managers in slow‐growing firms which isn’t the case for managers in fast‐ growing firms. This gives the managers in fast‐growing firms more time to focus on other work than the daily operations and problems of the firm, which consumes much of the man‐ agers time in slow‐growing firms

  • 8.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial behaviour in small firms: Does it matter what managers do?2012In: The work of managers: Towards a practice theory of management / [ed] Stefan Tengblad, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, p. 245-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines why some small firms grow and others do not. The focus is on the relationship between managerial behaviour and small firm growth in fast- and slow-growing firms. Using Sune Carlson’s and Henry Mintzberg’s methodology, twelve top managers are observed - six from fast-growing firms and six from slow-growing firms. The results indicate there are no significant differences in the two manager groups as far as their roles, ’proactiveness’, networking behaviour, or managerial formality is concerned. It is suggested that there is a generic aspect that is common to the management at both fast- and slow-growing firms. Much of a small firm manager’s work, regardless of the pace of company growth, involves this generic, non-managerial behaviour (acting as a specialist or a substitute operator). Small firm managers should not overstate the importance of acting only ’managerially’. © Oxford University Press, 2013.

  • 9.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial Work and Growth in Small Firms2007In: The 20th SEAANZ Conference,  23rd- 26th September, 2007, Auckland, New Zealand, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial Work in Small Firms: Testing the Robustness in Mintzberg’s propositions2006In: CPDR on Innovation and Product Development / [ed] Sven-Åke Hörte, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2006, p. 123-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    On learning in University Driven Networks: Prerequisites for the learning process in networks of SME-managers and researchers2000Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Department for Project Management and FENIX Research Program, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden & Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The emergent prerequisites of managerial learning in small firm networks2004In: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 292-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Descriptive studies have shown that co-operation in networks produces better possibilities for higher-level learning than small firms can organise on their own. Previous studies of learning in networks, however, have not considered how the prerequisites for higher-level learning develop over time in networks. This paper reports on a seven-year participant observational study of two different network constellations. A conclusion from the study is that the learning in networks of small-firm owner/managers is based on trust and has emergent prerequisites. These prerequisites are reciprocity between learning actors, the learning actors’ receptive and confronting capacity, and the transparency of the dialogue in the networks. Over time these prerequisites develop and create better opportunities for higher-level learning.

  • 13.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    What do owner-managers in small firms really do?: Differences in managerial behavior in small and large organizations2004In: Small Enterprise Research: The Journal of SEAANZ, ISSN 1321-5906, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 57-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented is a replication of Mintzberg's on managerial work. The article focuses on owner-managers in small manufacturing firms in an initial attempt to reveal the nature of the work undertaken by this type of managers. The purpose is to describe what they do and to compare their behaviour with that of managers in large and intermediate organizations as described by Mintzberg and Kurke & Aldrich. Our study compliments an earlier small-scale study on managerial behavior in small firms and includes sufficient data to test Mintzberg's propositions on managerial work. Empirically this paper draws on an observational study that deployed the method of structured observation. The daily activities of the small-firm owner-managers in our study are characterized by, among other things, informality and constant interruption as the process by which their work is organized. This differs partly from the results found in the studies of managers' work in larger organizations, where formal and planned activities serve more often as the procedure through which the managers design their work. Of Mintzberg's seven propositions, we found support for four, although with some hesitation. This calls into question the asserted generality of several such propositions. Our study indicates that there seem to be certain myths about what small-firm owner-managers really do, myths that need to be considered in future research.

  • 14.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    What do owner-managers of small firms really do?2003In: The 48th ICSB World Conference, June 15-18, 2003, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University.
    What do owner-managers of small firms really do? : Replicating Choran, Mintzberg, and Kurke and Aldrich2003In: The 16th SEAANZ Conference, 28 September – 1 October, 2003, Ballarat, Australia, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lunds university, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    University professors and early stage research commercialization: An empirical test of the knowledge corridor theory2012In: International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, ISSN 1470-6075, E-ISSN 1741-5284, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 213-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we test the knowledge corridor theory as an explanation of university professors' involvement in the early stages of research commercialisation. A statistical analysis was made of a sample of full professors from the engineering, natural sciences and medical faculties at a large public university in Sweden. The analysis shows that not only entrepreneurial experience but also private sector work experience significantly influence the ability to identify and develop business ideas based on research. Moreover, the analysis shows that research–based business idea generation increases faster for professors with private sector work experience who as well have more time for research in their positions.

  • 17.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    University professors and research commercialization: An empirical test of the "knowledge corridor" thesis2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in the determinants and outcomes of successful technology transfer and commercialization of research results. In this study we test the validity of the “knowledge corridor” thesis for explaining the involvement of university professors’ in the early stages of research commercialization. Statistical analysis on a sample of 86 respondents from engineering, natural science and medical faculties in a large Swedish university shows that both entrepreneurial and private industry experience significantly influence their ability to spot and generate business ideas in their research. Moreover, we find that research based business idea generation increase at a faster rate for professors with private sector work experience who have more time for research in their positions. The article ends with a discussion of our empirical findings together with its implications for support activities related to technology transfer and commercialization of research results.

  • 18.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial learning and development in small firms: implications based on observations of managerial work2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we set out to examine the conditions for managerial learning in small firms and the implications it gives for how to facilitate and support work-based management development in this context. Empirically, we conduct structured observations of the daily work activities performed by small business managers. A framework based on experiential learning theory is developed and used as an analytical tool to assess the extent to which these work activities provide them with opportunities for work-based learning and development. In short, the results show that small business managers experience a fragmented working day with frequent and different forms of interruptions and unexpected problems during the course of their working day. These interruptions and unexpected problems are something that leaves little time for engaging in reflective observation to effectively learn from their daily work practices. We discuss the implications of our results for theory and research on managerial learning in small firms as well as for the design of university-led management development programs aimed at supporting the experiential learning process of small business managers.

  • 19.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Business Simulation Exercises in Small Business Management Education: Using Principles and Ideas from Action Learning2010In: Action Learning: Research and Practice, ISSN 1476-7333, E-ISSN 1476-7341, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent calls to close the rigour-relevance gap in business school education have suggested incorporating principles and ideas from action learning in small business management education. In this paper we discuss how business simulation exercises can be used as a platform to trigger students' learning by providing them with a platform where they can merge theory with practice. We provide theoretical arguments accompanied by illustrations to show how such initiatives can create a more student-centred teaching structure than what is usually practised in contemporary business school education. This may in turn work as a potential bridge between the safe harbour of traditional classroom teaching and the more chaotic and complex world of managerial practice.

  • 20.
    Halila, Fawzi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Max
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Learning networks and the "joint knowledge creation" process: An example of SMEs and university working together towards ISO 14001 certifications1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Halila, Fawzi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Creating synergies between SMEs and universities for ISO 14001 certification2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 48, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of working with environmental issues, many SMEs have little knowledge of, or even interest in, these issues. When they engage with such issues, they generally have difficulty fully integrating them into their business activities. This case study takes an action research approach in describing how nine SMEs co-operated with a university team in a learning network to implement an Environmental Management System (EMS) with the aim of achieving ISO 14001 certification. The theoretical contribution of the article is its construction of a framework for understanding the outcomes in a learning network in which a university team works with SMEs. The practical contribution is that SMEs may use this empirically-supported learning network to overcome many EMS implementation barriers (e.g., lack of resources, isolation, and low self-confidence).

  • 22.
    Halila, Fawzi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Lu, Qi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    The diffusion of green innovation technology in the construction industry: European passive house knowledge transfer to China2017In: Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal, ISSN 1476-8917, E-ISSN 1478-8764, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 164-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The booming Chinese construction market has created both economic growth and environmental problems. Some 65 000 buildings in Europe have been constructed in accordance with the voluntary construction standard called Passive House that aims for energy efficiency. In China, however, by 2015, only twenty such projects were planned and only two Passive House projects were completed. In this paper we identify and describe the barriers to the diffusion and adoption of Passive House construction in China. We review the relevant literature (Chinese and Western) and conduct two case studies of Passive House construction in China. Two broad groups of barriers the bounded rationality of construction developers/managers and the high transaction costs of green innovation are found to be most responsible for the slow diffusion and adoption of the Passive House concept in China. Unless these barriers are overcome, prospects for the advance of green technology in the Chinese construction market are unfavourable. © 2017 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 23.
    Hertzman, Josefina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Kimplaire, Benoit
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Strategic Approaches and Barriers in Eco-Innovations: Case Studies in the Belgian and Swedish Beer Industries2014In: Engineering Management Research, ISSN 1927-7318, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the research on Eco-innovations in its exploration of the barriers to such innovations and of the different strategies managers use as they try to make their production and their products greener. The research consists of four case studies of manufacturers of ecological beer: two Swedish breweries and two Belgian breweries. The article examines how breweries, as first movers or fast followers, operate proactively orreactively when a new trend appears and takes hold in the alcohol industry. Based on the study’s findings, a conceptual framework is presented that depicts the barriers and strategies relevant to Eco-innovations. The article concludes with managerial recommendations for how firms involved with Eco-innovations may develop strategies that overcome their barriers.

  • 24.
    Hoekstra, Marike
    et al.
    Halmstad University. University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Lundberg, Max
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Towards inter-organizational democracy?: Employee participation in the development of a network of small and medium sized enterprises1997In: The 5th Annual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training, Queensland, Australia, Brisbane, Queensland: Griffith University , 1997, p. 159-169Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors present and discuss a new and important development in a network of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), that is the creation of a network of employees that will function in parallel and in interaction with the network of their managers. The meaning of trust and power will be highlighted as will the significance of both explicit and tacit knowledge. Finally, attention is drawn to this network structure as a form of inter-organisational democracy.

  • 25.
    Hörte, Sven-Åke
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Chibba, Aron
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Florén, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Frishammar, Johan
    Department of Business Administration and Management, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Product Development in SMEs: A literature review2008In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 299-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product Development (PD) in Small and medium-sized Firms (SMEs) is a long-neglected research area, and little cumulative work has been conducted previously. The purpose of this paper is to provide a first overview of the area of PD in SMEs. In doing so, we draw upon a sample of 149 peer-reviewed research papers selected from an initial sample of 5694 papers. The review provides tentative answers to issues such as the analytical and methodological approaches of the papers, which topics or areas of research have been focused on by previous scholars, and what kinds of topics that are well covered.

  • 26.
    Lundberg, Max
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Regional Learning and Governance (RELL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    From practice to practice: On the development of a network of small and medium sized enterprises1997In: Concepts and Transformation, ISSN 1384-6639, E-ISSN 1569-9692, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small and medium sized enterprises are an important feature of the Swedish industrial infrastructure. The formation of collaborative networks is seen as an important means for dealing with a shortage of financial, technical and other resources. This article deals with the start up and development of two networks involving managers of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and researchers from the Centre for Working Life Research and Development of Halmstad University. The striking features of the various phases of the development of the networks, as well as of those of the role of the researchers, are presented and discussed. Some important recent developments, such as connections between networks and community-based relationships, are also revealed.

  • 27.
    Lundberg, Max
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Knowledge and Commitment in Action : The dynamics of a network of small enterprises1997In: The Tenth World Productivity Congress, October 12-15, 1997, Santiago, Chile, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lundberg, Max
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Organizational Networks: An alternative way of organizing the development of small enterprises1996In: The 41st ICSB World Conference., Stockholm, Sweden, 17-19 June, 1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sivertsson, Olof
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Barriers to Business Model Innovation in Swedish Agriculture2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1957-1969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish agricultural companies, especially small farms, are struggling to be profitable in difficult economic times. It is a challenge for Swedish farmers to compete with imported products on prices. The agricultural industry, however, supports the view that through business model innovation, farms can increase their competitive advantage. This paper identifies and describes some of the barriers Swedish small farms encounter when they consider business model innovation. A qualitative approach is used in the study. Agriculture business consultants were interviewed. In a focus group led by the researchers, farmers discussed business model innovation, including the exogenous and endogenous barriers to such innovation. The paper concludes many barriers exist when farmers consider innovation of agricultural business models. Some barriers are caused by human factors, such as individuals’ attitudes, histories, and traditions. Other barriers are more contextual in nature and relate to a particular industry or company setting. Still other barriers, such as government regulations, value chain position, and weather, are more abstract. All barriers, however, merit attention when Swedish agricultural companies develop new business models. © 2015 by the authors.

  • 30.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    An informal approach to management development at small and medium-sized manufacturing companies2016In: International Journal of Information and Operations Management Education, ISSN 1744-2303, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable debate and discussion exist on the effectiveness and relevance of various management development models/approaches/methods intended to support companies and their managers. In recent years management researchers have described successful network collaborations among companies that increase managerial capability, effect positive change, and promote beneficial development. However, the literature has not fully explored the fundamental principles and learning outcomes of learning networks in this context. As a result, organisers (or providers) of management development courses and programs lack the needed resources that help them create effective learning environments. This paper describes an informal management development approach known as the learning network in which SME managers share experiences and ideas in a learning network characterised by mutual trust and purposeful collaboration.

  • 31.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Challenges facing small-firm managers in growing manufacturing firms2015In: Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 2192-5372, E-ISSN 2192-5372, Vol. 4, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this article is to better understand the management challenges facing managers in small growing firms.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Empirical data have been collected in Sweden through structured observations (approx. 20,000 min) of the working days of six top managers in fast- and six managers in slow-growing small manufacturing firms in order to compare managerial behaviour in two different contexts.

    Findings

    Managers in small firms are engaged in many different activities, but a small number of activities tend to take up the majority of the managers’ time. These activities can be classified as either operational or administrative. There are notably small differences (both in variance and differentiation) between the behaviours of managers in fast- and slow-growing firms; actually, there are more similarities than differences. There is also surprisingly little time spent by the managers on strategic work, even in the group of fast-growing firms. This might explain why growth and innovation in many cases come to a halt or even decline in these firms and represents such a challenge for the managers when they do not prioritize strategic work.

    Originality/value

    The study shows that managerial work in small firms is characterized by a generic behaviour and that the managers mainly use a habitual and limited behavioural repertoire. Many managers have difficulties in changing their mainly operational and administrative behaviour and thus the underlying strategy of the firm. They are ‘stuck’ in a path-dependency mindset, even though the development of the firm might require another strategy taken by the manager, as a response to meet environmental demands. © 2015 Tell

  • 32.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Designing management training using a learning network approach2011In: Research on Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management 2009‐2011: Introducing the Research Area of Innovation Science / [ed] Sven-Åke Hörte, Halmstad: Högskolan i Halmstad , 2011, p. 103-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In academic literature there are many references to empirical research about collaborations between companies and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in different network constellations in order to create change and development. However, when reading about all these different collaborations, it becomes obvious that the organising principles and under which conditions networks are effective to use as a development method are not clearly identified. In order to understand this complex area in a better way, I propose that researchers first need to understand the day‐to‐day work of managers and the issues they are confronted with in order to use a network approach as a transformation process that enables learning, in order to design a HEI‐based management training programme that supports action and therefore enables change. Another point of departure in this article is that, when using a learning network approach to design a management training programme, it is important to communicate and make different dimensions of learning very clear. Traditionally, it is often the cognitive (know how) and the social knowledge (know who) that is in focus when using a network perspective to work with management development. What I want to draw attention to in this article is that the psychodynamic knowledge (know myself), which creates self‐confidence and the courage/motivation to work with and try out new ideas, is important if change is to be reached. Also, this will create learning, not only at an individual level, but also at an organisational level, when knowledge is made clear through action (trial and error).

  • 33.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Learning Networks : A metaphor for inter organisational development1999In: The Babson Kaufmann Research Conference, Colombia, South Carolina, USA, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LEARNING NETWORKS—A METAPHOR FOR INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Joakim Tell, Halmstad University, Sweden

    Principal Topic

    I want to highlight the importance of external relations and the qualitative elements in dialogue for the development of SMEs, by using the metaphor of networks as a base for facilitating company development. I have, during a four years period, followed and studied inter organisational networks from “within,” and seen the possibilities of using networks (external relations) as a development tool. In this paper, I reflect over the process where different organisations meet and share knowledge and visions on how to work with development questions and emphasise the importance of external relations for both inter organisational and internal company development.

    Method

    The method used in this study is action research. In action research the question at issue is addressed by both researcher and the so called “researched,” the other (e.g. an organisation) who presents as well as represents the question. The research the learning, is in the joint action, which, if successful, will at the same time and in the same act a contribution to solving or clarifying practical problems as well as generate knowledge.

    Implications

    The implications drawn from this study is that external relations is an important complement in the development of SMEs, both on a personal level for the people taking part, but also on a company level. On a personal level, uncertainty reduction and changed values are examples on development, and on a company level, different intra/inter organisational development projects have been initiated.

    These relations have also proved to be an effective medium for sharing experience and enhancing mutual trust among the participants. It has particularly been effective in sharing tacit knowledge and creating new perspectives.

    In order to give representatives from SMEs a greater possibility to reflection, researchers from universities can work more closely with companies in the region and fill the roles necessary to facilitate these relations. I see that SMEs can use external relations as an alternative form of organisation for development, where a group of key persons from SMEs and universities form this ad hoc “development group,” to compensate for internal lack of resources. This closer co-operation between university and industry will also have a positive, long-term effect on the development of the region and the relations between university-industry.

  • 34.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Learning networks: A metaphor for inter organizational development in SMEs2000In: Enterprise and Innovation Management Studies, ISSN 1463-2446, E-ISSN 1469-5863, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 303-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to highlight the importance of external relations and the qualitative elements of dialogue for the development of SMEs. This is achieved by using the metaphor of learning networks as a base for facilitating inter and intra organisational company development. The paper draws on a five-year field study, where the emergence and workings of inter-organisational networks were followed from a participant perspective with special emphasis being placed on the outcome for SMEs of participating in a learning network. The focus of these networks was on experience exchange and joint knowledge creation, as well as business relations. A significant outcome of this inter-organisational networking was the sharing of knowledge and visions on how to work on development combined with an emphasis on the role of external relations for internal company development, i.e. the possibilities of using networks as a development tool. These relations have also proved to be an effective medium for sharing experience and enhancing mutual trust among the participants. It has been particularly effective in sharing tacit knowledge and creating new management perspectives. Results from the study indicates that SMEs can use the learning network as an alternative form of organisation for development, where managers from different companies, together with researchers, form an ad hoc ''development group'' to compensate for internal lack of resources.

  • 35.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial strategies in small, fast-growing manufacturing firms2012In: Journal of Management Development, ISSN 0262-1711, E-ISSN 1758-7492, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 700-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create a better understanding of the strategic management behavior of top managers in small, fast-growing manufacturing firms.

    Design/methodology/approach: Empirical data have been collected in Sweden through both a survey of the 100 fastest growing small firms during 2000 and the development five years after (2001-2006), as well as through structured observations of the working days of top managers in six fast-growing manufacturing small firms.

    Findings: Managers in small, fast-growing manufacturing firms are engaged in many different activities. However, a few activities tend to take the majority of their time. These activities are either operational (for instance, activities related to production, marketing and sales) or administrative (for instance, activities related to the firms’ personnel and to financial issues). Looking at the managers’ activities from a strategy management point of view, they spend very little time on strategic activities. This finding may explain why firm growth in many cases declines or even ceases.

    Originality/value: The paper contributes to the theoretical and empirical literature on strategic processes in small, fast-growing manufacturing firms by showing that the majority of their managers use a “simplistic strategy”. Such a strategy may imply that these managers find it difficult to alter their originally successful operational and administrative behavior in order to develop their firms. Such managers are “stuck” in a path dependency mindset, even though the growth of their firms requires that they adopt a more flexible management strategy.

  • 36.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Organising Principles of Learning Networks in HEI-based Management Training2015In: IAMOT 2015: 24th International Association for Management of Technology Conference: Proceedings: Technology, Innovation and Management for Sustainable Growth: 8-11 June 2015, The Westin, Cape Town, South Africa / [ed] Leon Pretorius & George Alex Thopil, Pretoria: University of Pretoria , 2015, p. 404-414Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has for decades been a discussion about the effectiveness and relevance of different management development methods in order to support companies to grow and develop. Management literature in recent years has made several references to successful collaborations between companies in different network constellations in order to enhance managerial capability, as well as to create change and development. However, the underlying idea and learning outcomes when using networks as a management development method have not been explicitly discussed in the literature. This makes it difficult for providers of management training to know how to organize and effectively apply the benefits of networks to create an effective learning environment.

    In order to understand the benefits of using networks as a development method, providers of management training must take as a point of departure the day-to-day work of managers, as well as their high concern for tasks into consideration. This in combination with an action-oriented learning environment constitutes the idea behind using a network approach to provide effective management training. The guiding organizing principles then become to review and to reflect on managerial experiences through a trustful dialogue whereby the provider of the training acts as a facilitator.

  • 37.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Organising University-Led Learning Networks Among Small-Enterprise Managers2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis elaborates upon the use of a university-led approach to facilitated learning through organised networks of small-enterprise managers and researchers. The opportunity for universities to take on an interactive role in initiating development processes, and even regional change in a wider respect, has been explored through an action research (AR) approach. One of the aims of the University-Led Learning Network (ULLN) is to develop the knowledge and managerial skills required by small-enterprise managers in order to cope better with an economic and social reality that is difficult to survey and to predict. This was done through the ongoing review and evaluation of actions carried out within as well as between the participating companies. Different management perspectives were scrutinised in an environment of close co-operation, with the intention of generating new ideas for action. ULLN is also an approach that enables the university to fulfil the task of co-operating with the external world, which in Sweden is referred to as "the third task", and to reach out to small enterprises, creating a common learning partnership. Earlier studies of networks focusing on an exchange of knowledge and learning demonstrate, above all, the power of innovation that come from a close relationship between companies and universities and the importance of dialogue. The analysis of this study shows similar results. However, there has in the past been a lack of long-term studies which monitored and investigated the effects of co-operation from within. This study aims to rectify that deficiency.

    In this thesis, it is argued that ULLN has unique advantages, such as the initiation and support of important processes of change, which are not equally matched by other approaches, such as those which depend on consultants, traditional education or purely industrial networks. ULLN should therefore be seen as an important complement to the development support structure for managers of small traditional manufacturing enterprises. This study contributes an understanding of the process of organising these networks, and an analysis of the type of learning developed through such lengthy co-operation over six years.

    The results of the study can be divided into three categories, namely:

    1. Implications of organising ULLNs for universities and researchers, by providing an understanding of the advantages of using the university as a platform for initiating development processes for small-enterprise managers in networks.

    Considerable knowledge and experience were gained during the study of the organisational requirements of continuous development processes, in order to generate and extend learning between small-enterprise managers and university representatives in a ULLN. Results from the study acknowledge the importance of the university adopting different roles during the process, in order to build the trust and commitment necessary for facilitating innovative and creative dialogue within the networks. Another important point that is highlighted in the study is the importance of the university and small traditional manufacturing enterprises meeting halfway in interdependent relations. For the university, this means taking on new roles, and for the small companies, a willingness to learn and to co-operate with other companies and organisations in networks rather than acting alone.

    This type of close interaction with companies gives university representatives a better knowledge base of small traditional manufacturing enterprises (which make up the majority of the small-business community in Sweden) and their special needs, which in turn contributes to a deeper understanding and makes it possible for the university to introduce research projects that are more relevant and draw small enterprises into a co-operative partnership with the university. The networks are a way of increasing mutual knowledge processes by enabling managers and researchers to examine a variety of development issues and solutions in the company of others who have different frames of reference and perspectives.

    2. A description of the effects of the ULLN in the participating companies in terms of development projects initiated.

    The thesis further supports the conclusion that learning in small enterprises is stimulated by interaction with other organisations. New ideas and the inspiration for development work are created in meetings between different actors. As a result of this partnership, projects have been developed internally within individual companies and between the participating companies - for instance in issues related to IT, improved working practices, employee exchanges, ISO 14 001, and so on. Practical lessons have been learnt about different ways of handling various company-related problems, as well as theoretical knowledge about the processes of change themselves. Thus the ULLNs have both initiated important changes and acted as a bridge between the university and SMEs during development work. Through this medium, the university has been able to establish links even with the traditional manufacturing small-enterprise community.

    3. A description and analysis of the learning process that is created by using the network concept as a development tool.

    The trustful relationships established between managers and researchers have proved to be an effective medium for sharing experience and enhancing mutual learning. It has been particularly effective in providing a basis for the sharing of explicit and tacit knowledge that is required to support the implementation of different development projects. The ULLN approach has also facilitated a more reflective type of learning (double-loop learning) and created new management perspectives, which have inspired further development. Managers have also become more "secure" in their management role (as a result of the frank and confidential dialogue with different actors in and through the network) and have, for example, experienced a greater ease in delegating and contributing to the empowerment of their employees.

  • 38.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The Emergent Nature of Learning Networks2008In: Entrepreneurial Learning: Conceptual Frameworks and Application / [ed] Richard T. Harrison & Claire M. Leitch, London: Routledge, 2008, p. 272-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book addresses the burgeoning interest in organizational learning and entrepreneurship, bringing together for the first time a collection of new papers dealing explicitly with entrepreneurial learning. Where past books have examined learning in a corporate context, Harrison and Leitch focus instead on the learning process within entrepreneurship and the small business. Areas covered include:

    • a review of the concept of entrepreneurial learning and the relationship between entrepreneurial learning and the wider literatures on management and organizational learning,
    • a review and development of a number of conceptual models of the process of learning in entrepreneurial contexts
    • an illustration of the applications of concept of entrepreneurial learning in a range of contexts
    • an international perspective on entrepreneurial learning.
  • 39.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Towards inter-organisational empowerment?: Employee participation in the development of a network of small enterprises2001In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a unique development in a network of small enterprises is presented and discussed. This is the creation of a network of employees that, in the first phase, had a function in parallel with the network of their managers, and which, over time, has led to tighter integration, by means of incorporating more employees in development work. The importance of trust and dialogue will be highlighted as well as the significance of both explicit and tacit knowledge. Finally, attention will be drawn to this network structure as a form of inter-organisational empowerment of employees. This is an extended and modified version of a conference paper that was written by Marieke Hoekstra, Max Lundberg and Joakim Tell for the 5th Annual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training, Queensland, Australia, 26-28th November, 1997.

  • 40.
    Tell, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University.
    Management Development in Small Firms: Understanding the Learning Dilemma for Small Business Managers2013In: International journal of Innovation Science, ISSN 1757-2223, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we link discussions about management development in small firms to the work environment of small business managers. In particular, our aim is to examine management development as an experiential process carried out in daily managerial practice. Using structured observations of managerial work, we found that small business managers operate in work environments with rich opportunities for learning. However, we also found that various and unexpected interruptions and problems typically fragment their workdays. In addition, such managers lack peer support and guidance and have few external interactions and little internal communication. As a result, small business managers find themselves in a learning dilemma that, in the long run, may limit their creativity and innovation. Based on these empirical findings, we draw conclusions about support for work-based management development in small firms.

  • 41.
    Tell, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A learning network as a development method – an example of small enterprises and a university working together2001In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Describes how the network concept could be used as a development method and to overcome some of the barriers for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to initiate and work with sustainable development questions. The study has been done in close co-operation with managers and employees from small enterprises, where the ISO 14001 work has been initiated and supported through the network, using each other and the network as an arena for joint reflection, support, and as a resource pool. The result from this study indicates that a university-driven learning network makes a difference in the development work of SMEs – as a source for inspiration, in initiating and working with development projects, for reflection, and as a sounding board, and through its effectiveness in acting as a large organisation.

  • 42.
    Tell, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Pia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Per-Ola
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ståhl, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Business Model Innovation in the Agri-food Sector2016In: International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development, ISSN 1947-8402, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to deepen our understanding of what we know about business model innovation in the agri-food sector, both from a theoretical as well as a practical perspective. The methodological approach used in the paper is built on interviews, focus groups and observations of agricultural entrepreneurs and agricultural advisors in the agriculture sector and a review of over 500 peer-reviewed research papers for the period 1990-2014. The findings of the study indicate that entrepreneurs within the agri-food sector ought to shift focus from only a producer perspective to also include an entrepreneurial perspective, e.g. to focus on business model innovation. Based on this knowledge the authors present implications for research and practice. The research field is young and broad, but developing, and in need of stronger theoretical foundations. This article is based on a combination of a systematic literature review of a new emerging field as well as empirical in-depth interviews, focus groups and observations. © 2016, IGI Global.

  • 43.
    Tell, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Pia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Per-Ola
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ståhl, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Business model innovation in the agri-food sector: a literature review2016In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 1462-1476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Because the business model is a fairly new concept, research is lacking on business model innovation in certain industry sectors. One such sector is the agri-food sector. Using a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed journal articles published from 1990 to 2014, this paper examines the where, when, and how of the use of business models and business model innovation in the agri-food sector.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A web-based search was conducted to identify peer-reviewed journal articles that contained a combination of “business model” or “business model innovation” with agriculture-related and food-related terms (e.g., “agri-food sector”). After winnowing out irrelevant and duplicate articles, 505 articles were chosen for analysis.

    Findings

    Using categories, the paper analyses various data about the selected articles. The categories include research settings, units of analysis, methodologies, and theories. Based on this analysis, the paper finds that these agri-food sector articles are primarily qualitative, empirical studies that focus on one or a few companies (i.e., case studies). The paper also finds that theory is not yet well developed in the research on the agri-food sector.

    Originality/value

    Systematic literature reviews of various concepts, theories, and models are common in many fields (e.g., information/software technology, healthcare, and organizational management). However, no such review is available for the agri-food sector, in particular in its use of business models and business model innovation. This paper addresses that gap with its review of relevant articles published in more than 300 journals in recent years. Based on this review, the paper draws conclusions about business model innovation in the agri-food sector and offers suggestions for future research. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited

  • 44.
    Ulvenblad, Per-Ola
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Pia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    An overview of sustainable business models for innovation in Swedish agri-food production2019In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies in the agri-food sector are under increasing pressure to adopt sustainable business models that consider not only economic but also both social and environmental aspects. This paper examines how Swedish food producers use sustainable business models to innovate their businesses. The empirical data comes from a telephone survey with 204 companies and from case studies of 4 companies. A conceptual framework regarding sustainability-oriented innovation (SOI) and a eight sustainable business model archetypes are used to map and analyse the sustainability innovation practices and the sustainable business models. The results show a surprisingly sustainable business focus taken by many companies, which is not only on optimization, but also on organizational transformation and on systems building. The results show the companies vary as far as which archetypes they match. The most common archetype matches are ‘Maximise material and energy efficiency’ and ‘Adopt a stewardship role’. Only 10% measure success solely in financial terms, while 80% measure success in financial terms as well as social and environmental terms. Another conclusion is that companies in the agri-food sector have unique characteristics and the value intention of the entrepreneurs is an important building block in sustainable business model innovation. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 45.
    Ulvenblad, Pia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ulvenblad, Per-Ola
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ståhl, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Agricultural business model innovation in Swedish food production: The influence of self-leadership and lean innovation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper focuses on the need for knowledge in leadership, organization and innovative thinking that exist in primary production throughout the value chain from the farm to the final consumer. There are also needs in terms of improving and developing the entire value chain from the farm to the final consumer. Self-leadership and lean innovation is in this paper proposed to enhance the possibilities for business model innovation in the food production. The aims of the paper are two folded; Firstly, the aim is to present a framework containing self-leadership and lean innovation and how these theoretical approaches can facilitate and shape business model innovation in the agricultural sector. Secondly, the aim is to show a way of working with this problem area in order to meet these needs in the agricultural sector. A framework for business model innovation is presented as well as an interactive research design addressing the problem area in terms of action research in which learning networks is an important concept. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research challenges. 

1 - 45 of 45
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf