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  • 1.
    Defruyt, Simon
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    De Brandt, Koen
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Helping dual career athletes to recover from injury: a dual career support providers’ (DCSPs’) perspective2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The combination of elite sport and study, called a dual career (DC), can be challenging for athletes. DC Athletes can encounter co-occurring challenges at different domains of development (athletic, psychological, psychosocial, educational/vocational and financial) (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004). In this challenging period and environment, the burden of an injury is likely to be stressful for DC athletes. Although previous research have looked at how sports stakeholders can support the athletes within the athletic domain, no research up to our knowledge addressed how elite athletes can be supported holistically (i.e. in the different domains of development) outside of the club context. Therefore, current research aimed at gathering good practices of holistic support for DC athletes from a dual career support provider (DCSP) perspective.

    Methods

    Within the ‘Gold in education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) project, co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union, focus groups were conducted with a selection of DCSPs. As inclusion criterion for the participants, a DCSP was defined as: ‘a professional consultant, related to an educational institute and/or an elite sport organization – or certified by one of those – that provides support to elite athletes in view of optimizing their DC (combination of elite sport and education).’ One focus group in Sweden with six DCSPs and two focus groups in Belgium with two and three DCSPs were held. Using a phenomenological approach, participants were asked to share their methods used to holistically support DC athletes in coping with an injury.

    Results

    Five main themes of support emerged from the DCSPs discussions: a) practical support (e.g. support with transport problems if necessary), b) emotional support (e.g. empathic listening), c) reframing the injury in a holistic perspective (e.g. athletes will have more time for studies and family), d) empowerment of self-regulation competences (e.g. encourage the use of a recovery agenda), e) multidisciplinary and multi-organizations’ cooperation (e.g. structural meetings between different DC stakeholders).

    Conclusion

    Findings underscore the importance of a developmental and empowering approach in holistically supporting DC athletes to recover from an injury. Moreover, the cooperation between stakeholders in a DC support environment is crucial for an optimal recovery. Future research and practice could use current findings to develop injury recovery programs in a DC setting.

    References

    Wylleman P, Lavallee D. (2004). A Developmental Perspective on Transitions Faced by Athletes. In M Weis (Ed.), Developmental sport psychology. Morgantown, WV: Fitness International Technology.

  • 2.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Moving to Play Abroad: Experiences of Transnational Team Handball Players2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many athletes strive to excel in their sport, dreaming of fame and fortune, aiming for a career as a professional athlete. In the Nordic countries, becoming professional often implies a migration across national borders. In this relocation, it is not only crucial for transnational athletes to adapt in sport, a cultural and psychological adaptation is also needed (Ryba, Haapanen, Mosek, & Ng, 2012; Agergaard & Ryba, 2014). The purpose of this study was to examine team handball players’ experiences of their first transition and adaptation to a professional league in a foreign country, with a specific focus on their perceived demands and coping strategies. Participants were 18 senior elite team handball players (10 male, 8 female). During narrative-type interviews participants were encouraged to tell their story, focusing on how they experienced their first transnational transition. Participants’ narratives were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2013), themes and patterns of meaning were identified. The four major themes of perceived transition demands were: ‘Learn new cultural and social codes’, ‘Adjust to the rules of the new club’, ‘Accept the result focused environment’, ‘Acknowledge your role and play it’. Three themes of coping strategies were: ‘Embrace the challenge’ (e.g., be aware of the new context, negotiate and adapt to new norms and expect the unexpected) ‘Embrace yourself’ (e.g., to care for and prioritize yourself in a self-centered, but still positive way) and ‘Embrace your demons’ (e.g., accept feelings of doubt and anxiety and carry on regardless of them). Based on the research findings recommendations will be provided for psychological support of transnational athletes in their transition and adaptation abroad.

  • 3.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Athletic and Student Identities of Swedish Adolescent Student-Athletes: Mixed-Method Exploration2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 153-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the project was to explore Swedish adolescent student-athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS) based on the holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and career transition framework (Stambulova, 2003). Transitional variables (e.g., demands, coping strategies, personal and environmental resources,) covering student athletes’ sport, studies, and private life were studied in line with their athletic and student identities. This presentation will particularly focus on how student-athletes’ dual career experiences affect their athletic and student identities during their first year at NESS. Participants (main sample) were first year student-athletes of 15-16 years old representing different sports and 33 NESS across the country. A longitudinal mixed-method research design was implemented with the first quantitative measurement conducted in autumn (n = 261), and the second measurement in spring (n = 250). Athletic and student identities were measured using the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS; Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993) and the Student Identity Measurement Scale (SIMS; Engström & Stambulova, 2010). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants from the main sample two times during the year (autumn and spring). Interview guides were structured in three parts exploring student athletes’ near past (e.g., previous experiences of combining sport, studies and private life or the dual career experiences between the two interviews), present status in the transition (e.g., demands, coping strategies, perception of themselves as students and athletes), and future expectations. The results of both quantitative and qualitative exploration of the student-athletes’ identity issue can be summarized as follows: (1) no significant changes were found in athletic and student identities between the two quantitative measurements, however, athletic identity was significantly higher than student identity in both measurements, (2) interviews confirmed that student-athletes perceived themselves to have higher athletic than student identity but also that inter-individual variations in their perceptions existed, (3) there were intra-individual differences in how student-athletes perceived their self-identities between the first and the second interview, (4) there was a clear message from the interviews that searching for an optimal balance between student and athlete roles and also between athletic and student identities was perceived as a key issue in adjusting to the dual career at NESS. The participants’ narratives will be used to illustrate the complexity of student-athletes’ perception of their athletic and student identities.

  • 4.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Eriksson, Pernilla
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Idrottares dubbla karriärer2018In: Specialidrott: tränings- och tävlingslära / [ed] Avdelningen Elitidrottsstöd, Riksidrottsförbundet, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2018, p. 237-251Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    From the Swedish dual career model to a national digital system of dual career support services2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 241-241Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sport and educational systems in Sweden have a long history (since the 1970s) of cooperating on a high school level. Recently steps have been taken by the Swedish Sport Confederation to initiate cooperation in higher education (i.e., university level). Swedish research on athletes’ dual careers has mainly focused on the high school level (e.g., Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014; Uebel, 2006), with Fryklund (2012) as the only one who targeted the university level. Stambulova et al. (2014) presented the Swedish dual career model to set up an agenda for future dual career research in Sweden. The model aligns the stages in the Swedish educational system with related age markers and stages in athletic as well as vocational development illustrating possible dual career pathways and related transitions. Outlined by the Swedish dual career model a new project has been initiated.  Demands and challenges as well as the relevant needs in psychological support of Swedish university student-athletes are investigated through mixed-method qualitative and quantitative explorations. Based upon findings and in collaboration with researchers in health innovation and embedded intelligent systems a national digital system of dual career support services is going to be developed and tested. The digital service can be explained as an online national career assistance program including dual career education, networking and training from a preventive-supportive perspective. That is, helping university student-athletes to develop knowledge, competencies and skills to become more competent and (with time) autonomous in managing their own careers. In a broader sense, the system is seen as facilitating implementations of the Swedish dual career philosophies of “winning in the short-run”(i.e., obtaining an optimal dual career balance) and “winning in the long-run”, that is, proactively preparing student-athletes for athletic career termination (Stambulova et al., 2014). © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 6.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Profiles of Dual Career Competences of Swedish University Student-Athletes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining sport and education (or work) is termed as athletes ‘dual careers’ (DC) and it is an evolving area of research in Europe, guided by the European Union Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (2012). In this presentation, results from a Swedish national study will be presented. The aim of the study was to investigate university student-athletes’ DC competences (i.e., knowledge, skills, experience and attitudes) for a successful DC. The study is part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) involving eight other European countries. Seventy-one Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 25.2) representing various sports completed the DC Competence Survey. The survey measured student-athletes’ perceptions (i.e., importance and possession) of 38 DC competences (e.g., ability to prioritize, dedication to succeed, self-discipline, ability to cope with stress), and student-athletes’ experience of, coping with, and use of competences in seven challenging DC scenarios (e.g., missing important days in school, moving away from home, injury). The Latent profile analysis on student-athletes’ possession of competences indicated that the model with a 3-profile solution provided the best fit (entropy = 0.876; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test =.01). Profile-1 (P1: n=7) corresponded to student-athletes with an average level of competence; Profile-2 (P2: n=42) to an average-to-good level of competence, and Profile-3 (P3: n=22) to a good competence level. Profile-3 outscored the two other profiles in terms of mean coping with all seven DC scenarios (P1: M=3.39; P2: M=3.58; P3: M=4.15), indicating that the more competences student-athletes possessed the better they coped. However, the pattern of coping between profiles was not consistent across all scenarios, suggesting that some competences were more important for some scenarios and less important for others. Further analysis aims to reveal scenario-specific competences to guide practitioners helping student-athletes in specific DC scenarios.

  • 7.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Eriksson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Uebel, Maja
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Development of a system of dual career support at Swedish National Sports Universities: Swedish national dual career guidelines2019In: Abstract book: Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., 2019, p. 281-281Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012 the European Commission issued European guidelines on dual careers (DC) of athletes to inspire “the formulation and adoption of action-oriented national dual career guidelines and to raise awareness at national level about the concept of dual careers” (p.3). In parallel with the ongoing expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, the Swedish Sports Confederation initiated a working group to develop a system of DC support at Swedish National Sports Universities (RIUs) and Elite Sports-friendly Universities (EVLs) summarized in the Swedish national DC guidelines (2018). The working group consisted of four practitioners representing RIUs/EVLs (e.g., DC-coordinators, study counsellors), two Swedish DC researchers, and two officials of the Swedish Sports Confederation. Six two-day working group meetings were conducted during two years (2016-2018) to develop this policy document as a culturally informed synthesis of national and international DC research, EU guidelines on DCs, experiences and knowledge from RIUs and EVLs including best practice examples, and in line with the Swedish strategy for Sports. The Swedish national DC guidelines outline the organizational model for RIUs and EVLs and provide 36 guidelines in how to facilitate (a) an environment for DCs, (b) academic development, (c) athletic development, (d) a balance between sport, studies and private life, and (e) student-athletes’ career transitions. The Swedish national DC guidelines currently set a national standard for DC support across the country and inspire universities to further develop their support in line with recommendations from national and international DC research.

  • 8.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Facilitating Student-Athletes’ Development in Sport and Life through Optimizing their Dual Career Development Environment2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 30-31Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Holistic approach to understanding a dual career environment at a Swedish university2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 243-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual career (DC; combination of sport and studies) research is traditionally focused on student-athletes’ developmental demands and coping resources. To support athletes’ talent development in combination with education, sport federations and universities (and others) co-create high performance centers or DC hubs. Research into these environments is limited. Inspired by the holistic ecological approach, and particularly by the athletic talent development environment model (Henriksen, 2010), we created the dual career development environment (DCDE) working model and then used this model to explore a ‘golf and study’ environment at a Swedish university. The DCDE model is structured into three levels (micro, meso, and macro) and three domains (study, sport, and private) taking into account societal institutions, sport and education systems. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with nine university elite golf-students about perceived support during their transition to, and first year within the environment, and with four stakeholders (e.g., coach, study director) to discover their perspective on the environment and the support they provided. Observations and documents collected from the environment web-page also supported the analysis. Key features of the investigated DCDE related mainly to the micro and meso levels and included: collaborative arrangements between sport and academic stakeholders aimed at facilitating the student-athletes’ DCs, high quality coaching and facilities, stakeholders’ shared focus on a ‘whole person’ including, for example, student- athletes’ physical and psychological well-being. It was also found that the daily life of the student-athletes was concentrated around the campus gym as a place to meet and discuss various sport, study and personal life issues with each other and with their physical coach (also a university teacher). Further study is planned to target the macro level of the environment to advance these findings. 

  • 10.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Promoting dual career support services: Swedish perspectives and actions taken2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 47-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we share: (a) key findings on experiences and competences of Swedish dual career support providers (DCSP) from the European Project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport”, and (b) insights into the actions derived from the Project and taken to advance the dual career (DC) support services in Sweden. Across the country, 31 DCSPs (mean age= 47.4) completed the DCSP survey that measured perceptions of 35 competences to facilitate student-athletes’ development (e.g., be an active and supportive listener) and explored experiences of, and coping with, six DCSP’s scenarios (e.g., supporting a student-athlete when missing days in school). Additionally, six DCSPs took part in a focus group discussion on how they work and what methods they use to support their student-athletes. Overall, the results revealed that the DCSPs demonstrated high awareness of DC and related challenges, possessed necessary competences, managed the relevant scenarios, and reflected on their work in congruence with a whole person perspective. Results also indicated that the DCSPs worked mainly part time, held higher education degrees, but lacked specific DC education and networks. When positioning the findings within the Swedish DC context two major actions were initiated. First, as a DCSP is a new job profile in Sweden that should be developed, planning efforts for a national DCSP education system and a complementary national digital DC support service are currently in progress. Second, with the recent expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, a shared basis is needed for sustainable development. Therefore, the Swedish Sport Confederation initiated the action of developing Swedish national DC Guidelines. The Guidelines will be briefly outlined with strategies to facilitate student-athletes’ DC development including different transitions and their search for optimal balance between sport, studies, and private life.

  • 11.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    "Support upon request": Exploring a dual career development environment at a Swedish university2019In: Abstract book: The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology – Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., 2019, p. 274-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation shares a case study of a dual career development environment (DCDE) at a Swedish university based on the holistic ecological approach (Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017). The goal of the study was to explore the DCDE’s structure, DC processes, and philosophy of the DC support team. Data were collected through 10 semi-structured interviews (with eight university and sports staff members and two collaborative partners) and two focus groups (with four student-athletes, and four coaches). Participants were asked about their perceptions of the environment, key relationships, philosophy, and support. Observation of real-life events (e.g. meetings, training sessions), informal talks with 13 student-athletes and 21 staff members and stakeholders during eight full days, and analysis of relevant documents (e.g. webpage) provided additional insights into the environment. Results highlighted that the structure of the environment was characterized by a strong regional sports culture and collaboration between stakeholders with geographical and relational proximity and strong DC coordination. The coach-athlete relationship was the key relationship for DC support. The central DC processes were university regulations providing the student-athletes with the right to study flexibly, integrated DC planning between the coach and the athlete, and access to expert support. The philosophy of the DC support team was characterized by treating the student-athletes as "whole persons" and responsible grown-ups, meaning that no support was provided if the student-athletes did not request it. Implications of the approach taken by this DCDE are outlined at the conclusion of this presentation.

  • 12.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium.
    Swedish university student-athletes’ dual career scenarios and competences2019In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the Swedish data on university student-athletes’ dual career (DC) competences and coping, from the European project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport” (GEES). A cross-sectional quantitative design was implemented with the objectives to explore: (a) the student-athletes’ perceived need to develop DC competences in order to successfully combine sport and study, (b) if the student-athletes experienced and how they coped with specific DC scenarios, and (c) the magnitude of the association between the student-athletes’ possession of prioritized DC competences for each scenario and their scenario-specific coping. Seventy-one university student-athletes with a mean age of 25.21 completed the DC competency questionnaires developed within the GEES. The student-athletes reported their perception of importance and possession of 38 DC competences (e.g., cope with stress, prioritizing), as well as coping with seven DC scenarios (e.g., miss significant days of study), and selected the five most important competences (from the list of 38) to cope with each scenario. The results revealed that the student-athletes: (a) perceived a need to develop more than 70% of the DC competences to successfully combine sport and studies, (b) had experienced and coped average-to-good with the DC scenarios, and (c) possession of the top five prioritized competences was moderately-to-strongly related to their coping in three scenarios. The study extends understanding of Swedish university student-athletes’ DC competences and has contributed to development of Swedish National Guidelines for elite athletes’ dual careers (2018). © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 13.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Dual Career Balance in Student-Athletes University Transition2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing studies, a personal life and sports, that is, having a dual career, is considered as a challenge associated with transitional demands in athletic and non-athletic (psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, financial) domains (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013). The aim of this study was to investigate student-athletes’ university transition with a specific focus on how student-athletes balance different domains of their lives. Twenty-three Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 21.52; 16 males and 7 females) representing six sports (equestrianism, golf, handball, ice hockey, soccer, table tennis) partook in the study. Participants completed the Dual Career Monitoring Survey (DCMS), weekly, over the first twelve weeks of their university education. The DCMS is developed by the authors and measures student-athletes perceptions of balance, time investments, demands, coping, satisfaction, resources and barriers in relation to sport, studies, private life, social life and financial situation. In exploring student-athletes’ perception of dual career balance throughout the twelve weeks, an intra-class correlation analysis revealed a between-person variance of 0.14 (14%). That is, with regards to balance in their dual careers 86% was due to within-person variance, suggesting that balance is idiosyncratic and that further analysis should investigate within-person change. Encouraged by these findings we continued with a person-centered analysis using the Dynamic P-technique for modeling patterns of data (Nelson, Aylward, & Rausch, 2011). The relationships between changes in balance (i.e., prioritizing sport, studies or other domains of life), demands, coping and satisfaction throughout the twelve weeks will be presented. Our findings contribute to the understanding of balance as a central tenet of athletes’ dual careers (Second author et al., 2015). From our findings we suggest practitioners to take into account the individual dynamics in dual career balance from a whole-person perspective.

  • 14. Sandström, Elin
    et al.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Career profiles of athlete-coach relationships: Descriptions and interpretations2016In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 395-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore athlete-coach relationships from an athletic career perspective with the objectives: 1) to create individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships, 2) to illustrate the career profiles describing athletes’ subjective experiences of working with all the coaches involved in their careers, and (c) to summarize athletes’ views on the dynamics of athlete-coach relationships in the course of their careers. Two case studies using narrative interviews with one team and one individual sport athlete (both Swedish) were made. The Narrative Oriented Inquiry model was used to guide the data collection, treatment and interpretation. The results representing over 20 relationships in total are presented as individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships followed by interpretive narratives exploring more in detail the different athlete-coach relationships throughout their careers. Poems summarizing the athletes’ perceived dynamics of their relationships with coaches are then presented using only the athletes own words.

  • 15.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    How to Become a Winner in the Long-Run? Dual Career Experiences of Swedish Adolescent Athletes2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will focus on a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS). In this study transitional issues (e.g., demands, resources, coping strategies related to sport, studies and private life) and athletes’ personal attributes (e.g., athletic and student identities) were addressed from a holistic lifespan perspective using longitudinal mix-method (quantitative and qualitative) research design. The instruments used in the two quantitative measurements (autumn and spring) included:  the Dual Career Survey (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Student Identity Measurement Scale (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Task & Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), and the Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale (Chen et al., in press). Participants (main sample) were athletes of 15-16 years old, representing two genders, 27 sports, and 33 NESSs across the country with 261 who took part in the first measurement and 250 who took part in the second measurement. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted twice a year with 10 participants from the main sample. The results confirmed that starting at NESS meant for student-athletes entering a complicated transition embracing all major spheres of their life. At the beginning of the year the participants underestimated demands of studying, doing sports and living at NESS and overestimated (based on previous relevant experiences) their readiness to pursue dual career at NESS. Later, during the year more awareness and understanding of the reality came, and led to their self-re-evaluation of the adaptation process and outcomes.  So, the 1st year at NESS can be seen as a way from an illusory to real adaptation (which continued even in the end of the year). Results confirmed that one of the most difficult aspects in the adaptation process at NESS was finding an optimal balance between sport and studies. It appeared impossible all the time to give 100% in both. Therefore, student-athletes had to prioritize one side that typically was sport. Some athletes experienced a dissonance between prioritizing sport and receiving a message from coaches/teachers that they are expected to prioritize studies. The study also showed contributions of athletes’ personal development (e.g., athletic identity, task orientation) to the adaptation process. Moreover, perceived total importance of sport, studies, and private life as well as satisfaction with these life domains contributed positively to student-athletes’ adaptation at NESS.

  • 16.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Engström, Cecilia
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    På väg mot att bli ”vinnare i långa loppet”: Riksidrottsgymnasieelevers upplevelser av dubbla karriärer under sitt första läsår2013Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish athletes' transition and adaptation during the first year at national elite sport schools2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 133-134Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    "Mindfoqus", Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The paper presents a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes' dual career experiences (including sport, studies, and private life) during their first year at national elite sport schools (Swedish abbreviation RIGs will be used) with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. The developmental model of transitions faced by athletes (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003) served as underlying frameworks.

    Design: A longitudinal mixed-method research design was used with autumn-to-spring quantitative and qualitative parts.

    Method: Sixteen year old student-athletes, representing 27 sports and 33 RIGs (n = 261 in the first and n = 250 in the second measurement), completed three quantitative instruments. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants.

    Results: Results revealed (a) significant changes in the participants' transition/adaptation variables from the first to the second measurement accompanied by rather high perceived quality of adjustment at RIG both at the beginning and at the end of the educational year; (b) significant contributions of the transition variables to the perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor; (c) significantly higher athletic than student identity in both quantitative measurements, but with inter- and intra-individual differences with regard to balancing the two shown by the qualitative data.

    Conclusions: The study contributes to deeper understanding of dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes; the authors provide recommendations for psychological dual career support services at RIGs and outline future research in the Swedish dual career model. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 19.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Halmstad applied sport psychology supervision model in action: a case of an elite swedish golfer2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 105-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation is planned as having two parts. First, the Halmstad Supervision applied sport psychology Model (HSM) developed by the first and the second authors during their more than a decade experiences of running an applied sport psychology course at Halmstad University (Sweden) will be briefly introduced. The HSM is a “local” framework that consists of: (a) pre-conditions addressing students’ and teachers’ backgrounds, as well as contextual and organizational issues that influenced development of the HSM, (b) underlying frameworks (e.g., the scientist-practitioner model and Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory), and goals for applied sport psychology supervision, (c) philosophy representing values and principles, theoretical orientations, and areas addressed in the supervision, (d) process including forms, methods and content, as well as the climate and ethics of supervision, and (e) outcomeswith students’ feedback and achievements (Stambulova,  Johnson & Linnér, 2014). Then, the third author’s (former student) experiences of the HSM in action during his six months intervention with an elite Swedish golfer will follow. The case under consideration was addressed by the student from a holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and included working issues, such as dealing with cognitive anxiety during golf matches, increasing the golfer’s self-confidence including one complicated situation with his coach, and helping the client with self-awareness and exploration of other than athletic roles to make his self-worth less depended on the golf performance. The student’s journey from the first contact with the client, through initial interviews, observations, and assessments to developing a working plan, realization of the plan with adjustments occurred, and up to termination of the intervention will be traced and complemented by reflections on the supervision and its effectiveness throughout different parts of the journey. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 20.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Insights from Sweden: Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2014In: Becoming a Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Professional: A Global Perspective / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York & London: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 276-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Student’s Supervised Practice on Helping an Elite Swedish Golfer: Application of the Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 280-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Setting up a Short International Experience for Students: Reflections from the Receiving Side2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, European Universities work on internationalization of their programs in response to the Europe 2020 Strategy, emphasizing a higher quality of education and employability of young people. During the last few years, fruitful collaboration was established between an American University and a European University. Culminating points of this collaboration were two visits of American students and staff to the host-university in Europe during 2013-15. In this presentation, representatives of the host-university will share their experiences and suggestions for organizing one week study abroad programs for American students and reflect on their pre-, during, and post-visit experiences. The preparatory period lasted for several months and included a visit to the American university to take part in marketing the study abroad trip, several meetings to design the program for the visit and ensure that all involved knew their responsibilities, discussing and receiving approval of the program from the two international departments. The program consisted of four educational modules (classes specially designed for the American students and classes together with local students involving teachers from both universities), sport events (e.g., practicing team handball with a local team, table tennis tournament), and social/cultural events (e.g., sightseeing tours). The American students also received a homework assignment to reflect on what they learned about the host-country’s higher education system, sport and exercise psychology at the host-university, and the host-country’s sport culture during their visit. Their assignments were collected post-visit and content analyzed. The summary (also shared with the American side) provided us with not only positive feedback, but also some insights into how to improve our work. Therefore, the benefits of the visits were mutual. This presentation will conclude with a list of suggestions to help promote the development of study a broad experiences for those universities that may host such programs.

  • 23.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Reflections on the Swedish national dual career project2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation the authors will summarize a recent Swedish dual career project and then reflect on lessons learned from this project in terms of a nature of dual career development and related factors. This longitudinal mixed-method study with a set of questionnaires (N=261; N=250) and interviews (N=10) was aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes’ dual career experiences during their first year at national elite sport schools with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. It was based on the holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004), the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003), and the “winning in the long-run” philosophy underlying the Swedish dual career system (Lindahl, 2011). Briefly, the results of the study revealed: (a) significant changes in the transition variables during the educational year and their significant contributions to the student-athletes’ perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor, and (b) the participants’ search for an optimal balance between their athlete and student roles/identities. Further elaboration on the results led to several conclusions that might inform future dual career studies. First, to clarify a nature of dual career development, the optimal dual career balance was defined as a combination of sport and studies that helped student-athletes achieve their educational and athletic goals, live satisfying private lives and maintain their health and well-being. Second, recommendations for the dual career service providers emphasized: (a) helping student-athletes to develop personal resources (e.g., life skills), (b) planning shifts in prioritizing sport or studies during the educational year/competitive season, and (c) ensuring an empowerment (rather than controlling) approach in social support from coaches and teachers. Third, the Swedish dual career modeldrafted based on the study might be an example for other countries to proceed with the national dual career guidelines. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 24.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual career competences of Swedish high school athletes2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 149-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden dual ‘sport and education’ career (DC) programs on the high school level are established at 51 settings across the country. Within these programs student-athletes practice their sport in sport clubs and in educational settings, and have supportive conditions at school (e.g., flexible scheduling). This study, investigating Swedish high school student-athletes’ DC competences, is a national project and also a part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) with eight other countries involved.  In this presentation (approved by the ethical board of the GEES consortium) we briefly introduce the GEES project and then focus on Swedish research findings. The DC Competences Survey was used to explore student-athletes general as well as scenario-specific DC competences. The sample consisted of 909 high school student-athletes (mean age =18.2; 43% females) from various sports. In examining general competences, the participants were introduced to 38 c ompetences and asked to evaluate them in terms of possession and importance for a successful DC. The highest in possession was “ability to live independently”, and the top three in importance (also evaluated higher by females) included: “perseverance during challenging times and in the face of setbacks”, “understanding importance of rest and recuperation”, “ability to cope with stress in sport and study”. In examining scenario-specific competences the participants read six scenarios, each presenting a difficult DC situation (e.g., missing significant days of study, sacrifices in social life, living away from home, injury), and responded about coping experiences (including perceived effectiveness) and related competences. The competences significantly contributed to effectiveness of coping with DC scenarios. It was also possible to identify transferable competences used by student-athletes in four or more scenarios (e.g., “dedication to succeed in both sport and stu dies”). The findings have become useful in defining the content of DC support services in Sweden.

  • 25.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schinke, Robert
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Van Raalte, Judy
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Brewer, Britton
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Petitpas, Albert
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Blodgett, Amy
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Viljaranta, Jaana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Selänne, Harri
    Mehiläinen Sports Medical Clinic, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual Career in Sport and Education: Context-Driven Research in North America and Europe2016In: Association for Applied Sport Psychology - 2016 Conference Program & Proceedings, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 148-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the North American intercollegiate (school-based) sport context, the career development of student-athletes is an established research area focused on athletes’ transition to the university and their athletic, professional, and personal development, including preparation for the university graduation and termination in sports. In contrast, athletes’ simultaneous pursuits in sport and studies, termed a “dual career” (DC) (European Union Guidelines on Athletes’ DCs, 2012), is a relatively new research trend within Europe, where sport is mainly club-based. Therefore, special arrangements between sporting and educational institutions are needed to facilitate athletes’ DCs. European researchers adopt a holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) to consider student-athletes’ athletic and academic pursuits as intertwined with their psychological, psychosocial, and financial developments. It is also emphasized that athletes (although supported) are  expected to take responsibility and develop competences to successfully initiate, maintain, and terminate their DCs. This symposium brings together North American and European researchers to discuss overlapping and specific features of DC research and applications in situ. The first presenter will briefly overview the US context of intercollegiate sports, introduce athletic identity foreclosure as a problematic issue and share a new sport-specific instrument to measure identity foreclosure. The second presenter will introduce a Canadian DC context and summarize four projects on how specific populations within it, that are immigrant and Aboriginal student-athletes, cope with DC challenges in conjunction with their acculturation processes. The third presenter will “transport” the audience to Finland and share a mixed-method project on achievement motivation of Finnish adolescent athletes, emphasizing a cultural construction of motivation. The fourth presenter will outline researc h findings on DC competences of Swedish adolescent athletes as a part of the European project titled “Gold and Education and Elite Sport”. The discussion will then be concentrated on DC intervention strategies, situated within national cultural contexts.

  • 26.
    Watson II, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Internationalization of Training in Sport and Exercise Psychology2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 164-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University faculty are often encouraged by administrators through strategic plans to develop international exchange opportunities to help students expand ideas and forms of thought (Lumby & Foskett, 2016). Given the educational, practical, and legal issues associated with the provision of sport psychology around the world, such a charge could be very helpful for the development of the field of sport and exercise psychology. This encouragement to internationalize programs makes sense in terms of the potential benefits for the educational, social, cultural and professional development of students, as well as the professional development of faculty. However, the logistical challenges of developing such programs can be overwhelming, especially when added on to the other pressures and time demands facing faculty in the current structure of higher education. This symposium will provide attendees with an overview of a specific exchange program developed between an American and European  university with the goal of enhancing the educational opportunities for students at both institutions. Individual presentations will address: 1) the benefits and challenges associated with internationalization of programs, 2) the steps associated with moving from concept development to actual travel, 3) the process of coordinating the receipt of study abroad students and faculty, and 4) future perspectives about international collaboration in the education of sport and exercise psychology students. The primary goals of this symposium will be to provide the audience with an understanding of the benefits and challenges of establishing and carrying out such a program from both the sending and receiving institutions, the provision of suggestions for moving forward with such a program from the perspective of both the sending and receiving institutions, and the identification of future directions with regard to the internationalization of sport and exercise psychology programs.

  • 27.
    Watson, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Future perspectives on international collaboration in sport and exercise psychology education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After two successful experiences of organizing study abroad trips, the American and the European Universities now work to continue and expand the collaboration for the benefit of both sides’ students and staff. Strategic planning for the future development of this internationalization initiative now includes the development of bi-direction exchanges, semester long study abroad opportunities, the development of a shared online learning platform for the creation of discussion boards and learning modules that would be available to both the American and European students, and the development of a joint on-line course on selected topics in international sport and exercise psychology related to major expertise areas at both universities. The focus of this presentation will be to reflect on the potential strategies in place to meet the current challenges of internationalization. This portion of the presentation will utilize a discussion based format and include the audience to help facilitate the achievement of the stated goals.  Such a discussion will include an overview of the lessons learned in the past, a discussion of the future vision for internationalization, and a discussion about problem solving strategies that can be used within university settings to enhance the likelihood of creating a successful internationalization experience for both students and faculty within sport and exercise psychology. As an outcome, the benefits and challenges of developing such an initiative will be outlined.

1 - 27 of 27
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