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  • 1.
    Garthwaite, Taru
    et al.
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sjöros, Tanja
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Saara
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Koivumäki, Mikko
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vähä-Ypyä, Henri
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Eskola, Olli
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Rajander, Johan
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallio, Petri
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Saarenhovi, Maria
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Löyttyniemi, Eliisa
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sievänen, Harri
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Houttu, Noora
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laitinen, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kalliokoski, Kari
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland; University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Associations of sedentary time, physical activity, and fitness with muscle glucose uptake in adults with metabolic syndrome2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the associations of sedentary time, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness with skeletal muscle glucose uptake (GU). Methods: Sedentary time and physical activity were measured with accelerometers and VO2max with cycle ergometry in 44 sedentary adults with metabolic syndrome. Thigh muscle GU was determined with [18F]FDG-PET imaging. Results: Sedentary time (β = −0.374), standing (β = 0.376), steps (β = 0.351), and VO2max (β = 0.598) were associated with muscle GU when adjusted for sex, age, and accelerometer wear time. Adjustment for body fat-% turned all associations non-significant. Conclusion: Body composition is a more important determinant of muscle GU in this population than sedentary time, physical activity, or fitness. © 2022 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 2.
    Haapala, Eero A.
    et al.
    University Of Jyväskylä, Jyvaskyla, Finland; University Of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Sjöros, Tanja
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Saara
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Garthwaite, Taru
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallio, Petri
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Saarenhovi, Maria
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vähä-Ypy, Henri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Löyttyniemi, Eliisa
    University Of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Houttu, Noora
    University Of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laitinen, Kirsi
    University Of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kalliokoski, Kari
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; University Of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Association between cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic health in overweight and obese adults2022In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 62, no 11, p. 1526-1533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been inversely associated with insulin resistance and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors among overweight and obese individuals. However, most previous studies have scaled CRF by body mass (BM) possibly inflating the association between CRF and cardiometabolic health. We investigated the associations of peak oxygen uptake (V?O2peak) and peak power output (Wpeak) scaled either by BM-1, fat free mass (FFM-1), or by allometric methods with individual cardiometabolic risk factors and clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in 55 overweight or obese adults with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: VO2peak and Wpeak were assessed by a maximal cycle ergometer exercise test. FFM was measured by air displacement plethysmo- graph and glucose, insulin, HbA1c, triglycerides, and total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol from fasting blood samples. HOMA-IR and metabolic syndrome score (MetS) were computed. RESULTS: VO2peak and Wpeak scaled by BM-1 were inversely associated with insulin (β=-0.404 to -0.372, 95% CI: -0.704 to -0.048), HOMAIR (β=-0.442 to -0.440, 95% CI: -0.762 to -0.117), and MetS (β=-0.474 to -0.463, 95% CI: -0.798 to -0.127). Other measures of CRF were not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that using BM-1 as a scaling factor confounds the associations between CRF and cardiometabolic risk in overweight/obese adults with the metabolic syndrome. © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA.

  • 3.
    Koivula, Tiia
    et al.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Lempiäinen, Salla
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Saara
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sjöros, Tanja
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vähä-Ypyä, Henri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Garthwaite, Taru
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Löyttyniemi, Eliisa
    University Of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Cross-Sectional Associations of Body Adiposity, Sedentary Behavior, and Physical Activity with Hemoglobin and White Blood Cell Count2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 21, article id 14347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study examined whether hemoglobin (Hb) and white blood cell count (WBC) associate with body adiposity and other cardiometabolic risk factors, as well as accelerometer-measured sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA), when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). Methods: The cross-sectional analysis included 144 participants (42 men) with a mean age of 57.0 years and a mean BMI of 31.7 kg/m2. SB and standing time, breaks in sedentary time and PA were measured during four consecutive weeks with hip-worn accelerometers. A fasting blood sample was collected from each participant during the 4-week measurement period and analyzed using Sysmex XN and Cobas 8000 c702 analyzers. Associations of WBC, Hb and other red blood cell markers with cardiometabolic risk factors and physical activity were examined by Pearson’s partial correlation coefficient test and with linear mixed regression models. Results: In sex- and age-adjusted correlation analyses both BMI and waist circumference correlated positively with Hb, WBC, red blood cell count (RBC), and hematocrit. Hb was also positively correlated with systolic blood pressure, insulin resistance scores, liver enzymes, LDL, and triglyceride levels. Sedentary time correlated positively with WBC, whereas standing time correlated negatively with WBC. Lying time correlated positively with WBC, RBC, hematocrit, and Hb. Regarding SB and PA measures, only the association between lying time and RBC remained significant after adjustment for the BMI. Conclusion: We conclude that body adiposity, rather than components of SB or PA, associates with Hb levels and WBC, which cluster with general metabolic derangement. © 2022 by the authors.

  • 4.
    Kudomi, Nobuyuki
    et al.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland & Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan.
    Kalliokoski, Kari K.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Oikonen, Vesa J.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Han, Chunlei
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kemppainen, Jukka
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland & Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sipila, Hannu T.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland & Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland & Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Myocardial Blood Flow and Metabolic Rate of Oxygen Measurement in the Right and Left Ventricles at Rest and During Exercise Using 15O-Labeled Compounds and PET2019In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Simultaneous measurement of right (RV) and left ventricle (LV) myocardial blood flow (MBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and oxygen consumption (MVO2) non-invasively in humans would provide new possibilities to understand cardiac physiology and different patho-physiological states. Methods: We developed and tested an optimized novel method to measure MBF, OEF, and MVO2 simultaneously both in the RV and LV free wall (FW) using positron emission tomography in healthy young men at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Results: Resting MBF was not significantly different between the three myocardial regions. Exercise increased MBF in the LVFW and septum, but MBF was lower in the RV compared to septum and LVFW during exercise. Resting OEF was similar between the three different myocardial regions (similar to 70%) and increased in response to exercise similarly in all regions. MVO2 increased approximately two to three times from rest to exercise in all myocardial regions, but was significantly lower in the RV during exercise as compared to septum LVFW. Conclusion: MBF, OEF, and MVO2 can be assessed simultaneously in the RV and LV myocardia at rest and during exercise. Although there are no major differences in the MBF and OEF between LV and RV myocardial regions in the resting myocardium, MVO2 per gram of myocardium appears to be lower the RV in the exercising healthy human heart due to lower mean blood flow. The presented method may provide valuable insights for the assessment of MBF, OEF and MVO2 in hearts in different pathophysiological states.

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