hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Strahler, Katharina
    Institute of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stelter, Reinhard
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Experiencing flow in different types of physical activity intervention programs: three randomized studies2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether inactive individuals can experience flow, a rewarding, psychological state, during an exercise intervention and if there are differences according to the type of intervention they perform. Furthermore, the study investigates if experiencing flow is connected to physiological improvements attained during the exercise intervention. The 12‐ to 16‐week interventions included six randomized intervention groups, two female and four male groups performing continuous running, football, interval running and strength training. The results indicate that all six randomized exercise intervention groups experience rather high levels of flow regardless of whether the intervention is a team or individual sport. Differences in experiencing flow, worry and exertion as well as physiological improvements could be found for the different types of sports and the two genders, with the male football group having the highest score for physiological improvement and the lowest score for worry. A connection between experiencing flow and physiological improvement could not be found. Future research should investigate the influence that the participant's gender and also the type of sport have on experiencing flow, worry and perceived exertion. Furthermore, it should be investigated whether experiencing flow is linked to the long‐term compliance of regular physical activity. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S

  • 2.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Zheng, Miky
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte Nejst
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Glen
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports,, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    The importance of cohesion and enjoyment for the fitness improvement of 8–10-year-old children participating in a team and individual sport school-based physical activity intervention2017In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 343-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the enjoyment and cohesion of school children participating in a school-based high-intensity physical activity (PA) intervention. Both enjoyment and cohesion have been found to be important factors for adherence to regular physical and sport activity, an important outcome of PA interventions. The sample consisted of 300 pupils (mean age: 9.3 years; 52.7% female) assigned to a team sport intervention, an individual sport intervention, or a control group for 10 months. The Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale and Youth Sport Environment Questionnaire were used to measure enjoyment and cohesion. The Yo-Yo IR1C test determined fitness improvements. Results showed that enjoyment and cohesion (social) measured at the beginning of the intervention significantly predict fitness improvements achieved after 10 months. No differing developmental effects over time could be found in the intervention groups with regard to cohesion and enjoyment when comparing them to the control group. However, enjoyment and cohesion (social) significantly decreased in the groups that performed individual sports. Team sports seem to be more advantageous for the development of enjoyment and cohesion, which are both factors that positively impact the health outcomes of the intervention. © 2016 European College of Sport Science.

  • 3.
    Elholm Madsen, Esben
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hansen, Tina
    Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Damsgaard Thomsen, Sidsel
    University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Panduro, Jeppe
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ermidis, Georgios
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Randers, Morten B.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Hvid Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Wikman, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Can psychological characteristics, football experience, and player status predict state anxiety before important matches in Danish elite-level female football players?2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite football can make players feel nervous, and personality characteristics, as well as experience, affect how well pressure is handled before important games. Studying the psychological characteristics of female football players can provide information on how well psychological pressure is handled and generate knowledge on how to support players in order to improve performance. Based on a sample of 128 female elite football players from 8 top-level teams, the present study investigates whether psychological characteristics and football experience/player stus in elite female football players can predict state anxiety before important matches. Our results outline that high age and national team experience negatively predicted most of the trait anxiety subscales. In line with previous research, no psychological differences were found between goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders, and strikers while starting players revealed to have significantly lower trait anxiety. When measuring before important matches, we found that somatic state anxiety was negatively associated with senior national team experience and positively associated with worry trait anxiety and fear of failure. Cognitive state anxiety was negatively associated with hope for success and positively associated with somatic and worry trait anxiety. Self-confidence was positively associated with youth national team experience and negatively associated with worry trait anxiety. It can be concluded that psychological characteristics and national team experience are both important for optimal state anxiety before important matches in elite-level women's football. Implications for practice and future research are discussed. © 2020 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 4.
    Lind, Rune Rasmussen
    et al.
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Beck, Mikkel Malling
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Malarski, Krzysztof
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Geertsen, Svend Sparre
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Acute high-intensity football games can improve children's inhibitory control and neurophysiological measures of attention2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1546-1562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that a single bout of exercise can lead to transient performance improvements in specific cognitive domains in children. However, more knowledge is needed to determine the key exercise characteristics for obtaining these effects and how they translate into real-world settings. In the present study, we investigate how small-sided football games of either high-or moderate-intensity affect measures of inhibitory control in a school setting. Eighty-one children (mean age 11.8, 48 boys) were randomly allocated to three groups performing 20-minute of high-intensity small-sided real football games (SRF), moderate-intensity small-sided walking football games (SWF) or resting (RF). Behavioral measures of inhibitory control and neurophysiological measures of attention (P300 latency and amplitude) were obtained during a flanker task performed at baseline and 20 minutes following the intervention. Retention of declarative memory was assessed in a visual memory task 7 days after the intervention. Measures of inhibitory control improved more in children performing SRF compared to SWF 19 ms, 95% CI [7, 31 ms] (P = 0.041). This was paralleled by larger increases in P300 amplitudes at Fz in children performing SRF compared both to RF in congruent (3.54 mu V, 95% CI [0.85, 6.23 mu V], P = 0.039) and incongruent trials (5.56 mu V, 95% CI [2.87, 8.25 mu V], P < 0.001) and compared to SWF in incongruent trials (4.10 mu V, 95% CI [1.41, 6.68 mu V], P = 0.010). No effects were found in measures of declarative memory. Together this indicates that acute high-intensity small-sided football games can transiently improve measures of inhibitory control and neurophysiological correlates of attention. Intense small-sided football games are easily implementable and can be employed by practitioners, for example, during breaks throughout the school day. © 2019 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 5.
    Madsen, Esben Elholm
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Krustrup, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Hansen, Tina
    Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Aggestrup, Charlotte Sandager
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten Hvid
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Pfeffer, Kristina
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Ryom, Knud
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte Nejst
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Madsen, Mads
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Madsen, Jeppe Elholm
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne Marie
    University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Motivational predictors of children's involvement in out-of-school activities: An application of a football program2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 72-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “11 for Health in Denmark” in-school educational football program has shown to have numerous positive physiological and psychological effects in 10- to 12-year-old schoolchildren. A key part of the successful application of the program, however, has not yet been examined, namely the motivational processes underlying participation and behavioral changes. This study examined such motivational processes (i.e., autonomous motivation, beliefs, and intentions) using the trans-contextual model (TCM) and investigated if the 11 for Health in Denmark program increased intentions to participate in physical activity (PA) outside of school in 10- to 12-year-old schoolchildren. Using a web-based questionnaire, Danish-speaking schoolchildren (N = 276 [boys, 50.4%]; Mage = 10.44, SD = 0.35) from three schools and seven classes completed TCM-based questionnaires at three time-points (weeks 0, 1, and 5) while participating in the 11 for Health in Denmark program. Single-indicator structural equation modeling was performed to examine goodness-of-fit and parameter estimates. A path analysis using maximum likelihood estimation was used to test the direct and indirect effects of the TCM model. The results partly supported a mediation sequence, as we found significant direct effects in eight of 13 motivational variables (β = −0.25–0.83, p <0.05), indirect effects in one of nine variables (β = 0.15, p < 0.01), but no effects with regard to PA behavior. Findings provide evidence for a motivational link between Danish-speaking schoolchildren's autonomous and controlled motivation from in school to out of school, and may inform future interventions promoting motivation and participation in out of school PA. © 2022 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 6.
    Madsen, Mads
    et al.
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Institute of Sport Psychology and Physical Education, Faculty of Sport Science, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Madsen, Esben Elholm
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Department of Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and Psychomotor Therapy, University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ermidis, Georgios
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Department of Movement Sciences and Wellness, “Parthenope” University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Ryom, Knud
    Department of Public Health, Section of Health Promotion and Global Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rasmussen Lind, Rune
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte Nejst
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, Shanghai University of Sport (SUS), Shanghai, China.
    The “11 for Health in Denmark” intervention in 10- to 12-year-old Danish girls and boys and its effects on well-being—A large-scale cluster RCT2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 1787-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The present study investigates the well‐being effects for 10‐ to 12‐year‐old children  who participated in the school‐based intervention “11 for Health in Denmark,” which comprises physical activity (PA) and health education. Subgroup analyses were carried out for boys and girls.

    Method: Three thousand sixty‐one children were randomly assigned to an intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG) by 5:1 cluster randomization by school. 2533 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4; 49.7% boys) were assigned to IG and 528 children (mean age 11.4 ± 0.5; 50.8% boys) were assigned to CG. IG participated in the “11 for Health in Denmark” 11‐week program, consisting of 2 × 45 min per week of football drills, small‐sided games, and health education. CG did not participate in any intervention and continued with their regular education. Before and after the intervention period, both groups answered a shortened version of the multidimensional well‐being questionnaire KIDSCREEN‐27.

    Results: The “11 for Health in Denmark” intervention program had a positive effect on physical well‐being in girls (IG: 48.6 ± 8.5 to 50.2 ± 9.3), whereas the improvement was not significant in boys. The program also had a positive impact on well‐being scores for peers and social support (IG: 50.2 ± 10.2 to 50.8 ± 10.1), though when analyzed separately in the subgroups of boys and girls the changes were not significant. No between‐group differences were found for psychological well‐being or school environment.

    Conclusion: The intervention program had a positive between‐group effect on physical well‐being in girls, whereas the change was not significant in boys. The overall scores for peers and social support improved during the intervention period, but no subgroup differences were found.

     © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 7.
    Madsen, Mads
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte N.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Cyril, Rasmus
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Møller, Trine K.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Madsen, Esben E.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ørntoft, Christina
    Team Denmark, Brøndby, Denmark.
    Lind, Rune R.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ryom, Knud
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Christiansen, Søren R.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Elbe, Anne Marie
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Krustrup, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China.
    Well-Being, Physical Fitness, and Health Profile of 2,203 Danish Girls Aged 10-12 in Relation to Leisure-time Sports Club Activity-With Special Emphasis on the Five Most Popular Sports2022In: Strength and conditioning journal, ISSN 1524-1602, E-ISSN 1533-4295, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 2283-2290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the relationship between leisure-time sports club activities and well-being as well as physical health parameters in 10-12-year-old Danish girls. Two thousand two hundred three girls took part in the study, which included questionnaires on participation in leisure-time sports clubs, well-being, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test, long jump, balance tests, body composition, blood pressure (BP), and resting heart rate (RHR). Data were analyzed according to whether the girls participated in leisure-time sport and according to the 5 most frequently reported sports. Girls enrolled in leisure-time sports had higher physical well-being (49.3 ± 8.6 vs. 45.2 ± 8.3), psychological well-being (50.4 ± 9.0 vs. 49.4 ± 9.8), experienced more peer and social support (50.2 ± 10.0 vs. 48.9 ± 10.7), and perceived a more positive school environment (52.5 ± 8.0 vs. 50.5 ± 9.3), as well as showing higher Yo-Yo (+39%), long jump (+10%), and balance performance (+15%) than girls not involved in sport clubs. The girls active in sports clubs had higher relative muscle mass (+5%), lower fat percentage (-11%), body mass index (-5%), RHR (-3.4 b·min-1), and diastolic BP (-1.4 mm Hg) compared with girls not involved in sport (p<0.05). Girls who played soccer showed higher aerobic fitness compared with inactive girls (+67%), dancers (+39%), swimmers (+38%), and gymnasts (+16%). Gymnasts had a lower fat percentage than inactive girls (-19%), team handballers (-10%), swimmers (-12%), and soccer players (-4%). Girls participating in club-based leisure-time sports showed higher well-being and better fitness and health profiles than girls not involved in any sports club activities. Girls involved in soccer had better aerobic fitness and gymnasts a lower fat percentage. Copyright © 2020 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf