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  • 1.
    Adam, Rania E.
    et al.
    Department of Sciences and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Chalangar, Ebrahim
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för informationsteknologi, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Department of Sciences and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Pirhashemi, Mahsa
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Pozina, Galia
    Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för informationsteknologi, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Department of Sciences and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden & Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Willander, Magnus
    Department of Sciences and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Nur, Omer
    Department of Sciences and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Graphene-based plasmonic nanocomposites for highly enhanced solar-driven photocatalytic activities2019Ingår i: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, nr 52, s. 30585-30598Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    High-efficiency photocatalysts are crucial for the removal of organic pollutants and environmental sustainability. In the present work, we report on a new low-temperature hydrothermal chemical method, assisted by ultrasonication, to synthesize disruptive plasmonic ZnO/graphene/Ag/AgI nanocomposites for solar-driven photocatalysis. The plasmonic nanocomposites were investigated by a wide range of characterization techniques, confirming successful formation of photocatalysts with excellent degradation efficiency. Using Congo red as a model dye molecule, our experimental results demonstrated a photocatalytic reactivity exceeding 90% efficiency after one hour simulated solar irradiation. The significantly enhanced degradation efficiency is attributed to improved electronic properties of the nanocomposites by hybridization of the graphene and to the addition of Ag/AgI which generates a strong surface plasmon resonance effect in the metallic silver further improving the photocatalytic activity and stability under solar irradiation. Scavenger experiments suggest that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are responsible for the photodegradation of Congo red. Our findings are important for the fundamental understanding of the photocatalytic mechanism of ZnO/graphene/Ag/AgI nanocomposites and can lead to further development of novel efficient photocatalyst materials. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 2.
    Aikens, Ellen O.
    et al.
    Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, United States.
    Mysterud, Atle
    Center for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Bioscience, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Merkle, Jerod A.
    Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, United States.
    Cagnacci, Francesca
    Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.
    Rivrud, Inger Maren
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Hebblewhite, Mark
    Wildlife Biology Program, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, United States.
    Hurley, Mark A.
    Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, United States.
    Peters, Wibke
    Center for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Bioscience, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, Bayerische Landesanstalt für Wald und Forstwirtschaft, Abteilung Biodiversität, Naturschutz, Jagd, Freising, Germany.
    Bergen, Scott
    Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, United States.
    De Groeve, Johannes
    Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy, Department of Geography, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Dwinnell, Samantha P. H.
    Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Wyoming, Laramie, United States.
    Gehr, Benedikt
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionelle & Evolutive, CNRS, Montpellier, France, Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Heurich, Marco
    Department of Visitor Management and National Park Monitoring, Bavarian Forest National Park, Grafenau, Germany, Chair of Wildlife Ecology and Management, Albert Ludwigs University Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Hewison, A. J. Mark
    CEFS, Université de Toulouse, INRAE, Castanet Tolosan, France, LTSER ZA PYRénées GARonne, Auzeville Tolosane, France.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Wave-like Patterns of Plant Phenology Determine Ungulate Movement Tactics2020Ingår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 30, nr 17, s. 3444-3449Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals exhibit a diversity of movement tactics [1]. Tracking resources that change across space and time is predicted to be a fundamental driver of animal movement [2]. For example, some migratory ungulates (i.e., hooved mammals) closely track the progression of highly nutritious plant green-up, a phenomenon called "green-wave surfing" [3-5]. Yet general principles describing how the dynamic nature of resources determine movement tactics are lacking [6]. We tested an emerging theory that predicts surfing and the existence of migratory behavior will be favored in environments where green-up is fleeting and moves sequentially across large landscapes (i.e., wave-like green-up) [7]. Landscapes exhibiting wave-like patterns of green-up facilitated surfing and explained the existence of migratory behavior across 61 populations of four ungulate species on two continents (n = 1,696 individuals). At the species level, foraging benefits were equivalent between tactics, suggesting that each movement tactic is fine-tuned to local patterns of plant phenology. For decades, ecologists have sought to understand how animals move to select habitat, commonly defining habitat as a set of static patches [8, 9]. Our findings indicate that animal movement tactics emerge as a function of the flux of resources across space and time, underscoring the need to redefine habitat to include its dynamic attributes. As global habitats continue to be modified by anthropogenic disturbance and climate change [10], our synthesis provides a generalizable framework to understand how animal movement will be influenced by altered patterns of resource phenology.© 2020 Elsevier Inc.

  • 3.
    Aili, K.
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden & FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, M.
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, S.
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread pain over a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, nr Suppl. 2, s. 87-87Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If localised pain represent one end of a pain spectra, with overall better general health, chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia represent the other end of the spectra with worse general health and more comorbidities with other somatic diseases and mental illness. Sleep problems and fatigue are common among individuals reporting CWP and previous research indicate that sleep problems may be an important predictor for pain prognosis.

    Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate if sleep problems and fatigue predict the onset of CWP 5 and 18 years later.

    Methods: In order to get more stable baseline classifications of CWP, a wash-out period was used, including only individuals who had not reported CWP (according to ACR 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia) at baseline (−98) and three years prior baseline (−95). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5 year follow-up (−03) and 791 entered for the 18 year follow-up (−16). Four parameters related to sleep (difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and non-restorative sleep), and one parameter related to fatigue (SF-36 vitality scale) were investigated as predictors for CWP. Binary logistic regression analysis were used for analyses.

    Results: All investigated parameters predicted the onset of CWP five years later (problems with initiating sleep (OR 1.91; 1.16–3.14), maintaining sleep (OR 1.85; 1.14–3.01), early awakening (OR 2.0; 1.37–3.75), non-restorative sleep (OR 2.27; 1.37–3.75) and fatigue (OR 3.70; 1.76–7.84)) in a model adjusted for age, gender, socio-economy and mental health. All parameters except problems with early awakening predicted the onset of CWP also 18 years later. In all, 785 individuals did not report any of the sleeping problems at baseline (fatigue not included), 268 reported one of the problems, 167 two, 128 three and 117 subjects reported to have all four sleep problems. Reporting all four sleep problems was significantly associated with CWP at follow-up at both time points when adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and mental health (OR 4.00; 2.03–7.91 and OR 3.95; 1.90–8.20); adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and number of pain regions (OR 2.94; 1.48–5.82 and OR 2.65; 1.24–5.64) and in a model adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and pain severity (OR 2.97;1.53–5.76; and OR 3.02;1.47–6.21) for the 5 year and 18 year follow-up respectively, compared to not reporting any of the sleep problems at baseline.

    Conclusions: Both sleeping problems and fatigue predicts the onset of CWP 5- and 18 years later. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality in the clinic.

  • 4.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden & FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria L.E.
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, s. 87-87, artikel-id OP0072Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If localised pain represent one end of a pain spectra, with overall better general health, chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia represent the other end of the spectra with worse general health and more comorbidities with other somatic diseases and mental illness. Sleep problems and fatigue are common among individuals reporting CWP and previous research indicate that sleep problems may be an important predictor for pain prognosis.

    Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate if sleep problems and fatigue predict the onset of CWP 5 and 18 years later.

    Methods: In order to get more stable baseline classifications of CWP, a wash-out period was used, including only individuals who had not reported CWP (according to ACR 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia) at baseline (−98) and three years prior baseline (−95). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5 year follow-up (−03) and 791 entered for the 18 year follow-up (−16). Four parameters related to sleep (difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and non-restorative sleep), and one parameter related to fatigue (SF-36 vitality scale) were investigated as predictors for CWP. Binary logistic regression analysis were used for analyses.

    Results: All investigated parameters predicted the onset of CWP five years later (problems with initiating sleep (OR 1.91; 1.16–3.14), maintaining sleep (OR 1.85; 1.14–3.01), early awakening (OR 2.0; 1.37–3.75), non-restorative sleep (OR 2.27; 1.37–3.75) and fatigue (OR 3.70; 1.76–7.84)) in a model adjusted for age, gender, socio-economy and mental health. All parameters except problems with early awakening predicted the onset of CWP also 18 years later. In all, 785 individuals did not report any of the sleeping problems at baseline (fatigue not included), 268 reported one of the problems, 167 two, 128 three and 117 subjects reported to have all four sleep problems. Reporting all four sleep problems was significantly associated with CWP at follow-up at both time points when adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and mental health (OR 4.00; 2.03–7.91 and OR 3.95; 1.90–8.20); adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and number of pain regions (OR 2.94; 1.48–5.82 and OR 2.65; 1.24–5.64) and in a model adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and pain severity (OR 2.97;1.53–5.76; and OR 3.02;1.47–6.21) for the 5 year and 18 year follow-up respectively, compared to not reporting any of the sleep problems at baseline.

    Conclusions: Both sleeping problems and fatigue predicts the onset of CWP 5- and 18 years later. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality in the clinic.

  • 5.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria L.E.
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden & University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Syddansk Universitet, Graasten, Danmark.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och omvårdnad. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective2018Ingår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 1-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that sleep problems may be an important predictor for chronic widespread pain (CWP). With this study we investigated both sleep problems and fatigue as predictors for the onset of CWP over a 5-year and an 18-year perspective in a population free from CWP at baseline.

    Methods: To get a more stable classification of CWP, we used a wash-out period, including only individuals who had not reported CWP at baseline (1998) and three years prior baseline (1995). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5-year follow-up and 791 entered for the 18-year follow-up. Difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue were investigated as predictors separately and simultaneously in binary logistic regression analyses.

    Results: The results showed that problems with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early awakening and non-restorative sleep predicted the onset of CWP over a 5-year (OR 1.85 to OR 2.27) and 18-year (OR 1.54 to OR 2.25) perspective irrespective of mental health (assessed by SF-36) at baseline. Also fatigue predicted the onset of CWP over the two-time perspectives (OR 3.70 and OR 2.36 respectively) when adjusting for mental health. Overall the effect of the sleep problems and fatigue on new onset CWP (over a 5-year perspective) was somewhat attenuated when adjusting for pain at baseline but remained significant for problems with early awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue. Problems with maintaining sleep predicted CWP 18 years later irrespective of mental health and number of pain regions (OR 1.72). Reporting simultaneous problems with all four aspects of sleep was associated with the onset of CWP over a five-year and 18-yearperspective, irrespective of age, gender, socio economy, mental health and pain at baseline. Sleep problems and fatigue predicted the onset of CWP five years later irrespective of each other.

    Conclusion: Sleep problems and fatigue were both important predictors for the onset of CWP over a five-year perspective. Sleep problems was a stronger predictor in a longer time-perspective. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality and fatigue in the clinic. © The Author(s). 2018

  • 6.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain – a mixed method study2019Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, nr Suppl 2, s. 2159-2159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common condition (approximately 10% prevalence), that affects women twice as often as men. There is a lack of knowledge in how different coping strategies relates to health status during CWP development in a general population.

    Objectives: To explore different ways of coping with CWP and to relate the different coping strategies to health-related factors, before and after developing CWP.

    Methods: A sequential explorative mixed methods study including 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016, but not in 1995. Individual interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach, and resulted in four categories of coping strategies. These categories were further explored with regard to four dimensions of health status (physical function, bodily pain, vitality and mental health) as measured by SF-36 (0-100, a lower score indicates more disability) and sleep problems measured both in 1995, and 2016.

    Results: The qualitative analysis revealed four categories representing different coping strategies, where each woman was labelled by the most dominant category; the mastering woman, the persistent woman, the compliant woman and the conquered woman. The first two categories emerged as being active coping strategies, and the latter two as passive. Women with passive strategies reported significantly lower vitality (median 57.5 vs 75, p=0.007) and worse mental health (median 54 vs 93, p=0.021) in 1995, before they had developed CWP compared with those with active coping strategies. No differences were seen between the groups on physical function, bodily pain or sleep.

    In 2016, there were still a difference between the passive and active group regarding mental health (median 56 vs 80, p=0.022), but not for vitality (median 35 vs 40, p=0.707). No differences were seen between the groups on physical function or bodily pain. All eight women with passive strategies reported problems with sleep in 2016, as compared to 6 of the 11 women with active strategies (p=0.045).

    Conclusion: Women that reported CWP in 2016, but not in 1995, described both active and passive coping strategies. The qualitative findings were associated with differences in vitality and mental health already in 1995, before they had developed CWP. Further, those with passive coping strategies reported worse health with regard to mental health and sleep problems in 2016. Interestingly, the groups did not differ in bodily pain or physical function neither in 1995 nor in 2016, which implicates the importance for the clinician to take the typical coping strategy into consideration, when meeting these patients in clinical settings. © Aili, Bergman, Bremander, Haglund & Larsson 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

  • 7.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Women’s experiences of coping with chronic widespread pain – a qualitative study2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, s. 1815-1815, artikel-id FRI10737-HPRArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Approximately ten percent of the population report chronic widespread pain (CWP), the condition is more common among women than men. For most people, the pain interferes with many aspects of every-day life and implies large consequences. However, the group reporting CWP is heterogeneous and there is a need for better understanding of the different strategies used for coping with pain in every-day life.

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe women’s experiences of how to cope with CWP.

    Methods: The study had a descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Individual interviews were conducted with 19 women, 31–66 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016. CWP was defined according to the 1990 ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. To be considered chronic, the pain should have persisted for more than three months during the last 12 months. A manifest qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the main question “How do you cope with your chronic widespread pain?” The analysis resulted in four categories.

    Results: Women described their coping with CWP in four different ways; to take control, to continue as usual, to follow instructions and to rest. To take control meant to make deliberate decisions to handle everyday day life. It also meant to take care of oneself, to think positive and to exercise at an adequate level. To continue as usual meant not to listen to body signals and either to ignore or accept the pain. To follow instructions meant listening to the health professionals and following advices, but without taking any part of the responsibility for the treatment outcome. To rest meant to perceive an unreasonable need for recovery, to resign and let the pain set the terms for the daily living.

    Conclusions: Women expressed different ways of coping with CWP including both active and passive strategies. The coping strategies included two dimensions, where one ranged from actively taking control over the pain, to passively following instructions and the other from actively continue as usual by either accepting or ignoring the pain to passively rest and being mastered by pain.

  • 8.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden & RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Adding information on widespread pain to the start back screening tool when identifying low back pain patients at increased risk for poor prognosis2019Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, nr Suppl 2, s. 1457-1457Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 9.
    Aksel Jacobsen, Freja
    et al.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Inhibitors of intracellular enzymes for treatment of multiple sclerosis2019Ingår i: Atlas of ScienceArtikel, forskningsöversikt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
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  • 10.
    Aksel Jacobsen, Freja
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark.
    Scherer, Alexander N.
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Mouritsen, Jeppe
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Novozymes A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark.
    Bragadóttir, Hera
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Xelia Pharmaceuticals A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bäckström, B. Thomas
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark & BTB Pharma, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sardar, Samra
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Koleske, Anthony J.
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A Role for the Non-Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Abl2/Arg in Experimental Neuroinflammation2018Ingår i: Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology, ISSN 1557-1890, E-ISSN 1557-1904, Vol. 13, nr 2, s. 265-276Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis is a neuroinflammatory degenerative disease, caused by activated immune cells infiltrating the CNS. The disease etiology involves both genetic and environmental factors. The mouse genetic locus, Eae27, linked to disease development in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model for multiple sclerosis, was studied in order to identify contributing disease susceptibility factors and potential drug targets for multiple sclerosis. Studies of an Eae27 congenic mouse strain, revealed that genetic variation within Eae27 influences EAE development. The Abl2 gene, encoding the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Arg, is located in the 4,1 megabase pair long Eae27 region. The Arg protein plays an important role in cellular regulation and is, in addition, involved in signaling through the B- and T-cell receptors, important for the autoimmune response. The presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism causing an amino acid change in a near actin-interacting domain of Arg, in addition to altered lymphocyte activation in the congenic mice upon immunization with myelin antigen, makes Abl2/Arg a candidate gene for EAE. Here we demonstrate that the non-synonymous SNP does not change Arg’s binding affinity for F-actin but suggest a role for Abl kinases in CNS inflammation pathogenesis by showing that pharmacological inhibition of Abl kinases ameliorates EAE, but not experimental arthritis. © 2018 The Author(s)

  • 11.
    Al Jawaheri, Raad
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Negative impact of lake liming programmes on the species richness of dragonflies (Odonata): a study from southern Sweden2017Ingår i: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 788, nr 1, s. 99-113Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Liming programmes aiming to restore fish populations are being implemented in many acidified aquatic systems in northern Europe. We studied Odonata communities in 47 forest lakes in SW Sweden, 13 that are currently being limed, and 8 that have previously been limed. Thirty-one species were recorded, with the highest mean number in untreated lakes, followed by previously treated lakes and currently treated lakes. Species communities differed between untreated and limed lakes, but only few rare species found in the untreated lakes were absent in the treated lakes. Likewise, species known to thrive in acid environments were either rare or showed no preferences. Comparing the number of records of odonate species within a large regional area to the proportion of lakes inhabited in our study, we found that seven of the most commonly observed species occurred less frequently in limed lakes than in the untreated ones, including two of the three most common taxa. Reduced species numbers in limed lakes might be due to conditions on other trophic levels, including fish predation. We argue that Odonata should be considered when developing new biological indices of water quality, although the causes of the observed occurrence patterns need to be studied further. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  • 12.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Dai, Junhu
    Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; CAS-HEC, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Mollazehi, Mohammad D.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Abdel-Salam, Abdel-Salam G.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Pandey, Rajiv
    Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education, Dehradun, India.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of ambient climate and three warming treatments on fruit production in an alpine, subarctic meadow community2021Ingår i: American Journal of Botany, ISSN 0002-9122, E-ISSN 1537-2197, Vol. 108, nr 3, s. 411-422Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise: Climate change is having major impacts on alpine and arctic regions, and inter-annual variations in temperature are likely to increase. How increased climate variability will impact plant reproduction is unclear. Methods: In a 4-year study on fruit production by an alpine plant community in northern Sweden, we applied three warming regimes: (1) a static level of warming with open-top chambers (OTC), (2) press warming, a yearly stepwise increase in warming, and (3) pulse warming, a single-year pulse event of higher warming. We analyzed the relationship between fruit production and monthly temperatures during the budding period, fruiting period, and whole fruit production period and the effect of winter and summer precipitation on fruit production. Results: Year and treatment had a significant effect on total fruit production by evergreen shrubs, Cassiope tetragona, and Dryas octopetala, with large variations between treatments and years. Year, but not treatment, had a significant effect on deciduous shrubs and graminoids, both of which increased fruit production over the 4 years, while forbs were negatively affected by the press warming, but not by year. Fruit production was influenced by ambient temperature during the previous-year budding period, current-year fruiting period, and whole fruit production period. Minimum and average temperatures were more important than maximum temperature. In general, fruit production was negatively correlated with increased precipitation. Conclusions: These results indicate that predicted increased climate variability and increased precipitation due to climate change may affect plant reproductive output and long-term community dynamics in alpine meadow communities. © 2021 The Authors. American Journal of Botany published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Botanical Society of America

  • 13.
    Albinsson, John
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Brorsson, Sofia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Clin Physiol & Nucl Med Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Improved tracking performance of lagrangian block-matching methodologies using block expansion in the time domain: In silico, phantom and invivo evaluations2014Ingår i: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 40, nr 10, s. 2508-2520Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate tracking performance when an extra reference block is added to a basic block-matching method, where the two reference blocks originate from two consecutive ultrasound frames. The use of an extra reference block was evaluated for two putative benefits: (i) an increase in tracking performance while maintaining the size of the reference blocks, evaluated using in silico and phantom cine loops; (ii) a reduction in the size of the reference blocks while maintaining the tracking performance, evaluated using in vivo cine loops of the common carotid artery where the longitudinal movement of the wall was estimated. The results indicated that tracking accuracy improved (mean - 48%, p<0.005 [in silico]; mean - 43%, p<0.01 [phantom]), and there was a reduction in size of the reference blocks while maintaining tracking performance (mean - 19%, p<0.01 [in vivo]). This novel method will facilitate further exploration of the longitudinal movement of the arterial wall. (C) 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.

  • 14.
    Anderberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Thomas, Tom R.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Low friction and emission cylinder liner surfaces and the influence of surface topography and scale2019Ingår i: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 133, s. 224-229Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A low friction piston ring pack, with tangential load halved, was tested in engines with four different cylinder liner finishes. Oil consumption, oil temperature and liner surface temperature were monitored at different load and speed levels, under similar test conditions. The two smoother surfaces generally kept lower oil consumption compared to the two rougher ones. Results were correlated using an area-fractal analysis. The relative area of the surface was calculated at different scales and the result was compared with the level of oil consumption for the different liner surfaces at different engine speeds. It was found that oil consumption was strongly correlated with scale for areas of above 1000 μm2 and below 20 μm2.  © 2018

  • 15.
    Anderberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Staffan
    Volvo Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per H.
    Volvo Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Robert
    Volvo Powertrain, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Wear Resistance of Smooth Automotive Cylinder Liner Surfaces2005Ingår i: World Tribology Congress III, Volume 2, New York, NY: ASME Press, 2005, s. 603-604, artikel-id WTC2005-64281Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands for decreased environmental impact from vehicles are resulting in a strong push for decreased engine oil, fuel consumption and weight. New machining and coating technologies have offered ways to attack these problems. Engine oil and fuel consumption are to a great extent controlled by the topography of the cylinder liner surface and it is therefore important to optimise this surface. Recent engine tests have shown a reduction in oil consumption when using cylinder liners with a smoother finish than that given by the current plateau honing. However, engine manufacturers are hesitant to introduce smoother liner surfaces because of fears of severe wear and scuffing. There is also the possibility that smoother liner surfaces may be more sensitive to the choice of piston ring finishes. This paper therefore seeks to investigate the functional performance and resistance to wear of these smooth cylinder liners and the mating top ring surfaces. Copyright © 2005 by ASME

  • 16.
    Andersson, Maria L.E.
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden | Spenshult research and development centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Spenshult research and development centre, Halmstad, Sweden | Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden.
    Aili, Katarina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott. Spenshult research and development centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden | Spenshult research and development centre, Halmstad, Sweden | University of Southern Denmark, Department of Regional Health Research, Odense, Denmark.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult research and development centre, Halmstad, Sweden | Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden | The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Metabolic factors associated to clinical hand osteoarthritis in individuals with knee pain2020Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 79, nr Suppl. 1, s. 1734-1734Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is some evidence supporting associations between metabolic factors, clinical hand osteoarthritis (OA) and radiographic knee OA. However, more studies are needed regarding early knee OA.

    Objectives: The aim was to study associations between metabolic factors and clinical hand OA at baseline in a cohort of individuals with knee pain, with and without radiographic knee OA.

    Methods: In an ongoing five-year longitudinal study of knee pain, hand OA was assessed by clinical examinations in 296 of the included individuals at baseline [1]. BMI, waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure was measured. Body composition was assessed with Inbody 770. Fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL-and LDL-cholesterol and HbA1c was analysed. Metabolic syndrome (MetS)was present if central obesity (WC ≥94 cm in men and ≥80cm in women) plus any two of the following factors: raised blood pressure (systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 85 mm Hg or treatment of hypertension), raised triglycerides (≥ 1.7 mmol/L or specific treatment), reduced HDL-cholesterol (men < 1.03 mmol/L and women < 1.29 mmol/L or specific treatment), raised glucose (glucose ≥ 5.6 mmol/L, or type 2 diabetes). Hand strength and self-reported disability of the arm, shoulder and hand (quickDASH) was assessed.

    The individuals were divided according to having clinical hand OA or not, according to Altman [1]. The associations between background factors and clinical hand OA were calculated by crude logistic regression analyses, adjusting for age and sex.

    Results: Fifty-five percent of the individuals in the study was overweight or obese, 40% had MetS and 23% had radiographic knee OA. In total 34% of the individuals had clinical hand OA. The group with hand OA were older, had higher proportion of body fat, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1C, worse quickDASH score and lower hand strength, table 1. Clinical hand OA was significantly associated to higher age (OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.07), higher fasting plasma glucose (1.56, 1.05-2.30), worse quickDASH (1.04, 1.02-1.06) and lower hand strength (0.99, 0.99 -0.998), but not to proportion of body fat and HbA1c.

    Conclusion: In this cross-sectional study, the only metabolic factor associated with clinical hand OA was fasting plasma glucose. Contrary to other studies, there were no gender differences found. The association between development of clinical hand OA and metabolic factors in individuals with knee pain need to be further assessed in longitudinal studies.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Köpenhamns universitet, Köpenhamn, Danmark.
    Abl-tyrosinkinaser och multipel skleros2018Ingår i: BestPractice, Vol. 6, nr 24, s. 14-16Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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  • 18.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Aksel Jacobsen, Freja
    Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    B-cells and Inflammation in the Absence of the Abelson Related Gene (Arg)2016Ingår i: Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, E-ISSN 2155-9899, Vol. 7, nr 6, artikel-id 1000470Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Abelson non-receptor tyrosine kinases, c-Abl and Arg, are important regulators of cellular processes in cancer, inflammation, infection, and neuronal dynamics. Recent research on the role for these kinases in processes involving interactions with the cytoskeleton or signaling molecules, may lead to further insight into the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders, including chronic inflammatory diseases. In a mouse model for multiple sclerosis, we recently reported that Arg deficient mice develop T-cell mediated autoimmune neuro-inflammation with the same severity as littermate controls, but display a different B-cell phenotype upon immunization. Here we comment on these results and discuss the role for Arg in B-cell activation and homeostasis.

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  • 19.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sardar, Samra
    Nordic Bioscience, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A transcriptional regulator controlling severity in experimental arthritis2019Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, nr Suppl. 2, s. 667-667, artikel-id FRI0011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Susceptibility to Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is dependent on complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors. Protein candidates and their role in pathways leading to chronic inflammation of the joints, in addition to their potential as drug targets, can be revealed with the help of experimental models for disease (1). From the results of functional genetic studies, we have recently shown that the T-box gene, TBX3, is a candidate gene in Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA), an experimental model for RA (2). TBX3 encodes a transcriptional regulator involved in differentiation of several organs, including bone, during embryonic development. It has, in addition, been demonstrated important in oncogenesis (3). Our studies suggest that TBX3 has a role in B-cell activation and is important for the severity of disease in the CIA model (2). Objectives: The objective of this project is to understand the role for the transcriptional regulator TBX3 in development of RA. Methods: Bioinformatics based comparative studies of mouse and human alleles in the regulatory region of TBX3. CRISPR/Cas9-introduced deletions and base modifications in human B-cell lines. Activation of genetically modified B-cells in vitro, followed by analyses of proliferative response and antibody production. Results: Studies of CIA development in mice with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory region of Tbx3 revealed a significant difference in severity of arthritis. In line with this, the anti-collagen type II antibody titers were shown substantially higher in mice with more severe arthritis, even before onset of disease. In addition, preliminary data shows that the proliferative response to Type II collagen upon re-challenge of lymph node cells in vitro is higher in these mice, suggesting a more active response to the disease-inducing antigen. Because the TBX3 gene is conserved between mouse and human, we are investigating whether similar genetic variations are found in the regulatory region of the human TBX3 gene and whether the putative genetic variation would lead to a distinct B-cell phenotype upon activation in vitro. Conclusion: We suggest that the oncoprotein TBX3 is a novel candidate contributing to disease severity in experimental arthritis. Investigations of genetic variation in the TBX3 gene and its role in the activation of human B-cells will reveal whether this protein is a candidate for influencing also development of RA.

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  • 20.
    Atiq, Ferdows
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Van De Wouw, Jens
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Sorop, Oana
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    De Maat, Moniek P. M.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Merkus, Daphne
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Klinikum der Universität München, Munich, Germany; Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung e. V., Berlin, Germany.
    Duncker, Dirk J.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Leebeek, Frank W. G.
    Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Endothelial Dysfunction, Atherosclerosis, and Increase of von Willebrand Factor and Factor VIII: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Swine2021Ingår i: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, E-ISSN 2567-689X, Vol. 121, nr 5, s. 676-686Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    All rights reserved.It is well known that high von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It is still debated whether VWF and FVIII are biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis or whether they have a direct causative role. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the pathophysiological pathways of increased VWF and FVIII levels associated with cardiovascular risk factors. First, we performed a randomized controlled trial in 34 Göttingen miniswine. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced with streptozotocin and hypercholesterolemia (HC) via a high-fat diet in 18 swine (DM + HC), while 16 healthy swine served as controls. After 5 months of follow-up, FVIII activity (FVIII:C) was significantly higher in DM + HC swine (5.85 IU/mL [5.00-6.81]) compared with controls (4.57 [3.76-5.40], p = 0.010), whereas VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) was similar (respectively 0.34 IU/mL [0.28-0.39] vs. 0.34 [0.31-0.38], p = 0.644). DM + HC swine had no endothelial dysfunction or atherosclerosis during this short-term follow-up. Subsequently, we performed a long-term (15 months) longitudinal cohort study in 10 Landrace-Yorkshire swine, in five of which HC and in five combined DM + HC were induced. VWF:Ag was higher at 15 months compared with 9 months in HC (0.37 [0.32-0.42] vs. 0.27 [0.23-0.40], p = 0.042) and DM + HC (0.33 [0.32-0.37] vs. 0.25 [0.24-0.33], p = 0.042). Both long-term groups had endothelial dysfunction compared with controls and atherosclerosis after 15 months. In conclusion, short-term hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia increase FVIII, independent of VWF. Long-term DM and HC increase VWF via endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Therefore, VWF seems to be a biomarker for advanced cardiovascular disease. © 2021 Georg Thieme Verlag. 

  • 21.
    Averfalk, Helge
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Enhanced District Heating Technology: Maintaining Future System Feasibility2017Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    When heat demand and high temperature heat supply gradually decreases in the future, then it will effect district heating systems ability to compete on the heat market. A good way to mitigate less district heating feasibility is to operate systems with lower temperature levels and the most conceivable way to achieve lower temperature levels is to decrease return temperatures.

    Thus, this thesis emphasise temperature errors embedded in district heating systems. Only a selection of temperature errors are analysed in this thesis. First, the temperature error that occurs due to recirculation in distribution networks at low heat demands. Second, the temperature error that occurs due to hot water circulation in multi-family buildings. Third, the temperature error that occurs due to less than possible heat transfer in heat exchangers, i.e. too short thermal lengths.

    In order to address these temperature errors three technology changes have been proposed (i) three-pipe distribution network to separate the recirculation return flow from the delivery return flow, (ii) apartment substations to eliminate hot water circulation utilisation, and (iii) improved heat exchangers for lower return temperatures at a constant scenario. Analysis of proposed changes has resulted in annual average return temperatures between 17-21 °C.

    Furthermore, rapid introduction of intermittent renewable electricity supply in the energy system has prompted an increased necessity of power system balancing capacities. Large-scale conversion of power-to-heat in electric boilers and heat pumps is a feasible alternative to achieve such balancing capacities. Analysis of the unique Swedish experience with utilisation of large heat pumps installations connected to district heating systems show that since the 1980s 1527 MW of heat power has been installed, about 80 % of the capacity was still in use by 2013. Thus, a cumulative value of over three decades of operation and maintenance exists within Swedish district heating systems.

    The two papers presented in this thesis are related to future district heating systems through the five abilities of fourth generation district heating (4GDH), which are documented in the definition paper of 4GDH.

  • 22.
    Averfalk, Helge
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Faktiska varmvattenflöden i flerfamiljshus2021Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta projekt innehåller insamling av mätdata från tappvarmvattenanvändning från flerbostadshus och bearbetning av densamma. Målet med projektet är att undersöka om det finns förutsättningar att korrigera nuvarande norm för dimensionerande flöde för tappvarmvatten. Resultaten påvisar potential att reducera normen för tappvarmvattenflöde.

    Detta projekt består av genomgång samt sammanställning av litteratur för fastställande av dimensionering av tappvarmvattenflöden till i huvudsak flerbostadshus. Därtill har datainsamling samt dataanalys utförts på tappvarmvattenmätningar tillhandahållna av Ngenic AB.

    Studien syftar till att uppdatera dimensionerande varmvattenbehov vid nybyggnation samt att ge råd till varmvattendimensionering i hus för att förbättra precisionen för den dimensionerade kapaciteten. Bättre dimensionering av bland annat ventiler och värmeväxlare ger mindre slitage och därmed längre livslängd men också förbättrad avkylning.

    Insamlad data har olika tidsupplösning: 6-sekunder (clamp-on, ultraljudsteknik), 1-minut och 15 minuter (enstrålig vinghjulsmätare). Mätningarna har skett vid olika tidsperioder där de längsta (1 år) varit för 15-minutersvärden och de övriga varierat runt cirka tre veckor. Därtill har data samlat för en uppsättning flerbostadshus med varierande storlek.

    Efter bearbetning av data görs följande observationer:

    1. 15-minutersvärden är olämpliga för att skatta momentant flöde (l/s)

    2. I storleksordnad jämförelse mellan 15-minuters värden och 6-sekundersvärden erhölls en mycket mindre avvikelse i momentant flöde (l/s) än förväntat.

    3. I storleksordnad jämförelse mellan 1-minutersvärden och 6-sekundersvärden erhölls så pass liten skillnad i momentant flöde (l/s) att dessa två perspektiv uppfattas som utbytbara och att det därmed inte nödvändigtvis föreligger något behov av att mäta med högre tidsupplösning än 1 minut.

    4. 1-minutersvärden för en uppsättning flerbostadshus av varierande storlek indikerar att det finns möjlighet att reducera dimensioneringsförutsättningarna för tappvarmvattenflöden.

    Denna studie verifierar nuvarande utformning av dimensionerande flöde för tappvarmvatten enligt F101. Vidare rekommenderas som en första ordningens anpassning av nuvarande Ekv. (7), där variabel A kan justeras från 2,10 till 0,84.

  • 23.
    Averfalk, Helge
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Low-temperature District Heating: Various Aspects of Fourth-generation Systems2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    With decreasing heat demand and less availability of high-temperature heat supply in future energy systems, the current district heating systems may experience increased competition on the heat market. A viable option to mitigate increasing competition is to operate systems with lower temperature levels, and the most conceivable way to achieve lower temperature levels is to decrease return temperatures.In this thesis, aspects of improvements in district heating systems are assessed. Three aspects, in particular, have been analysed. These are integration between energy systems, improvements in heat distribution technology, and economic benefits of low-temperature district heating systems.An increasing interest in integrating different energy systems has been prompted by the rapid introduction of intermittent renewable electricity supply in the energy system. Large-scale conversion of power to heat in electric boilers and heat pumps is a feasible alternative to achieve the balancing capacities required to maintain system functioning. Analysis of the unique Swedish experience using large heat-pump installations connected to district heating systems shows that, since the 1980s, 1527 MW of heat power has been installed, and about 80% of the capacity was still in use in 2013. Thus, a cumulative value of over three decades of operation and maintenance exists within Swedish district heating systems.Increased competition prompted by changes in the operation environment necessitates improved heat distribution. This thesis focuses on three system-embedded temperature errors: first, the temperature error that occurs due to recirculation in distribution networks at low heat demands; second, the temperature error that occurs due to hot-water circulation in multi-family buildings; third, the temperature error that occurs due to lower heat transfer than is possible in heat exchangers (i.e. too-short thermal length). To address these temperature errors, three technology changes have been proposed (i) a three-pipe distribution network to separate the recirculation return flow from the delivery return flow, (ii) apartment substations to eliminate hot-water circulation use, and (iii) improved heat exchangers for lower return temperatures. The analysis of the proposed changes indicates annual average return temperatures between 17°C and 21°C.The final analysed aspect is the economic benefits of low-temperature district heating. It was identified that strong economic motives for lower operating temperatures in future heat supply exist, whereas the economic motives are significantly weaker for the traditional heat supply.The five papers presented in this thesis are related to future district heating systems through the five abilities of fourth-generation district heating (4GDH), which are documented in the definition paper on 4GDH.

  • 24.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Benakopoulos, Theofanis
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Best, Isabelle
    University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany.
    Dammel, Frank
    Technical University of Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Engel, Christian
    Austroflex Rohr-Isoliersysteme GmbH, Perchtoldsdorf, Austria.
    Geyer, Roman
    AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna, Austria.
    Gudmundsson, Oddgeir
    Danfoss, Sønderborg, Denmark.
    Lygnerud, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Oltmanns, Johannes
    Technical University of Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Nord, Natasa
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Ponweiser, Karl
    Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria.
    Schmidt, Dietrich
    Fraunhofer IEE, Kassel, Germany.
    Schrammel, Harald
    AEE Intec, Gleisdorf, Austria.
    Skaarup Østergaard, Dorte
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Svendsen, Svend
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Tunzi, Michele
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Low-Temperature District Heating Implementation Guidebook: Final Report of IEA DHC Annex TS2. Implementation of Low-Temperature District Heating Systems2021Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This guidebook was written between 2018 and 2021 by seventeen authors that used approximately 15 000 hours of work within the IEA DHC TS2 annex. The content is based on more than 250 literature references and 165 inspiration initiatives to obtain lower temperatures in buildings and heat distribution networks. The author group wrote 40 internal documents about early implementations of low-temperature district heating. Fifteen of these early implementations are presented in this guidebook.The guidebook contains aggregated information about the main economic drivers for low-temperature district heating. It shows how to obtain lower temperatures in heating systems inside existing and new buildings, as well as in existing and new heat distribution networks. An applied study of a campus system in Darmstadt shows the possibility of reducing temperatures in an existing heat distribution network with rather high temperatures. The competitiveness of low-temperature district heating is explored by analysing business models and heat distribution costs. Early adopters of low-temperature district heating are presented by examples and by identified transition strategies. Five groups of network configurations with fourteen variants are presented to be used for low-temperature district heating. Finally, all 165 identified inspiration initiatives and all 137 locations mentioned are listed.

  • 25.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Dalman, Bengt-Göran
    BG Dalman AB, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kilersjö, Christer
    EKSTA, Kungsbacka, Sverige.
    Lygnerud, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Welling, Sebastian
    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Analys av 4e generationens fjärrvärmeteknik jämfört med 3e generationens: Simulering av sekundärnät i nybyggnationsområde2017Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrunden till studien är att nya förutsättningar genom energieffektivisering, konkurrens från värmepumpar och nya krav på kundsidan gör en modernisering av fjärrvärmeverksamhet nödvändig. En del av denna modernisering är att kunna dra nytta av de fördelar som lägre temperaturer i näten medför. Därtill skapas genom den nya tekniken förutsättningar för att ta hand om värmekällor som idag inte utnyttjas (t.ex. värme från kylprocesser och annan infrastruktur såsom värme från avloppsvatten och värme från kollektivtrafik).

    Befintlig teknik är beprövad och bygger på att det finns ekonomiska incitament att förbränna biobränsle och avfall. Steget till att pröva en ny teknik där andra värmekällor och en ny gränsdragning gentemot kund blir nödvändig är därför stort och förenat med ett antal frågor. Det är just de frågor som uppkommer i ett fjärrvärmeföretag inför implementering av 4e generationens fjärrvärmeteknik som projektet försöker identifiera. Det blir dock så att enbart en del av frågorna besvaras genom att studien har ett avgränsat fokus. Fokus är på jämförelse mellan ett 3GDHtvårörsystem och ett 4GDH-trerörsystem i ett sekundärnät i ett nybyggnationsområde.

    I projektet simuleras hur utfallet blir för olika parametrar om man hade valt att implementera 4e generationens teknik istället för 3e generationens teknik.

    Resultaten påvisar att:

    • 4e generationens lösning ökar energieffektiviteten i byggnader, detta främst genom att behovet av varmvattencirkulation försvinner.• Beaktas enbart distributionsförluster i näten så är 4e generationen mer effektiv än 3e generationen.• Genom lägenhetsväxlaren i 4e generationens lösning så elimineras risken för Legionella helt. En möjlig barriär för 4e generationens teknik består dock i att boverkets byggregler inte är konstruerade för att varmvattencirkulation inte finns.• Lägenhetsväxlarna innebär en kostnad per lägenhet vilket begränsar lösningens kostnadseffektivitet jämfört med en större värmeväxlare i fastighetens bottenplan. Idag är 4e generationens teknik lämpad för fastigheter med 10-15 lägenheter, är det fler lägenheter blir 4e generationens lösning dyrare än den konventionella 3e generationens lösning.• En viktig aspekt med 4e generationens lösning att värmeförlusten från huset förflyttas från fastighetsägaren till fjärrvärmeföretaget, genom att värmeleverans sker till varje lägenhet och inte vid husvägg. Initialt kan sådan börda på fjärrvärmeföretaget verka negativ med avseende på kostnad. Diskussionerna i projektet mynnade ut i att parterna enas om att affären blir mer rättvisande och att fastighetsägaren får ökad insyn i värmeförbrukningen vilket, med rätt affärsmodell, kan skapa ökat förtroende och en möjlighet att dela på förlusten mellan de två parterna.

    Projektet har omfattat löpande dialog med EKSTAs VD vilket varit värdefullt för att skapa förståelse kring fastighetsägarens perspektiv och frågor rörande 4e generationens teknik. Därtill har en workshop med EKSTAs driftspersonal hållits för att diskutera relevansen i de resultat som tagits fram. I projektet ingår BengtGöran Dalman med över 35 års erfarenhet av fjärrvärmeverksamhet vid Göteborg Energi. Projektets verklighetskoppling leder till slutsatsen att det inte föreligger någon särskild driftsproblematik för implementering av 4e generationens system.

    Som en egen del i projektet uppmärksammas den diskussion som förs i branschen kring möjligheten att dra nytta av billig el, främst under perioder då det blåser mycket och det blir ett överskott av el i elnätet. I studien analyseras möjligheten att inte använda en konventionell pelletspanna som tilläggsvärmekälla utan en eldriven panna. Resultaten visar att med dagens styrning genom skatter och avgifter så är det inte möjligt att dra nytta av att det förekommer perioder med mycket lågt elpris. Rådande regelverk stödjer istället installationer såsom pelletspannor.

    © ENERGIFORSK

  • 26.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Ingvarsson, Paul
    ÅF, Division Industry, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Gong, Mei
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Large heat pumps in Swedish district heating systems2017Ingår i: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 79, s. 1275-1284Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Power-to-heat solutions like heat pumps and electric boilers are foreseen to be possible future tools to stabilise international power markets with high proportions of variable power supply. Temporary low cost electricity can be used for heat generation at times with high availability of wind and solar power through substitution of ordinary heat supply, hence contributing to increased energy system sustainability. Power-to-heat installations in district heating systems are competitive due to low specific investment and installation costs for large electric boilers, heat pumps, and heat storages. Several large-scale heat pumps were installed in Swedish district heating systems during the 1980s, since a national electricity surplus from new nuclear power existed for some years. The aim of this paper is to summarise the accumulated operation experiences from these large Swedish heat pumps to support and facilitate planning of future power-to-heat solutions with heat pumps in district heating systems. Gained experiences consider; installed capacities, capacity utilisation, heat sources used, refrigerant replacements, refrigerant leakages, and wear of mechanical components. The major conclusion is that many of the large thirty-year-old heat pumps are still in operation, but with reduced capacity utilisation due to internal competition from waste and biomass cogeneration plants in the district heating systems.

  • 27.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Möllerström, Erik
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Ottermo, Fredric
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Domestic hot water design and flow measurements2021Ingår i: Energy Reports, E-ISSN 2352-4847, Vol. 7, nr Suppl. 4, s. 304-310Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the sizing of primary side components for preparation of domestic hot water are analysed, both qualitatively and based on measurements of domestic hot water demand in one multi-family building with 268 apartments. The collected data spans a period of 18 days during the end of 2020 and is collected in 15-min, 1-min, and 6-s intervals. An overview of the historic development for the design of domestic hot water flow in Sweden is also presented. There is a long-standing argument in Sweden, that the current district heating guidelines result in an overdesign of the flow for domestic hot water. The consequence of this is oversizing heat exchangers and valves in the substations. This study assesses, qualitatively, the issues related to overdesigned primary side valves for preparation of domestic hot water. A revised design for domestic hot water flow for the Swedish context is also conceptualised. The study suggests that an improved design flow for domestic hot water in multi-family buildings can be derived based on empirical measurements. The 15-min intervals are observed to tone down information of peaks to a degree where it is unsuitable to use as basis for a new design flow. The 1-min data does appear to preserve information to a degree where it can be used to assess a design flow when related to data with a 6-s interval. The 6-s data is expected to constitute a resolution that may be less available, and in this study, it constitutes a representation of the real domestic hot water demands. However, to find a fitted curve to empirical data, for the design flow based on number of apartments per multi-family building, the population of datasets needs to be increased. © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 28.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Ottermo, Fredric
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Pipe Sizing for Novel Heat Distribution Technology2019Ingår i: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, nr 7, artikel-id 1276Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses pipe sizing aspects for previously proposed, novel, low heat distribution technology with three pipes. Assessment issues include heat loss, pressure loss, and pipe sizing for different typical pipe configurations. This assessment has been provided by the analysis of a case area with single-family houses. Concerning heat loss, the proposed three-pipe solutions have the same magnitude of heat loss as conventional twin pipes, since lower return temperatures compensate for the larger heat loss area from the third pipe. Regarding pressure loss, the main restriction on the size of the third pipe is limited to the pressure loss in the third pipe. Thermostatic valves to manage the flow rate of the third pipe are advocated, since alternative small pumps have not been found to be commercially available. The pipe sizing recommendation is that the third pipe for recirculation purposes can be two to three standard pipe sizes smaller than the corresponding supply and return pipe, if no prosumer is connected in the heat distribution network.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Pipe Sizing for Novel Heat Distribution Technology
  • 29.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Persson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Low‐temperature excess heat recovery in district heating systems: The potential of European Union metro stations2020Ingår i: Book of Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Smart Energy Systems / [ed] Henrik Lund, Brian Vad Mathiesen, Poul Alberg Østergaard & Hans Jørgen Brodersen, 2020, s. 34-34Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an assessment of the excess heat recovery potential from EU metro stations. The assessment is a sub-study on low temperature recovery opportunities, explored in the H2020 ReUseHeat project, and consists of spatial mapping of 1994 underground stations with quantitative estimates of sensible and latent heat, monthly and annually, attainable in rejected platform ventilation exhaust air. Being a low-temperature source, the assessment conceptually anticipates recovery of attainable heat with compressor heat pumps to facilitate the temperature increase necessary for utilisation in district heating systems. Further, the paper explores the influence on useful excess heat volumes from low-temperature heat recoveries when distributed at different temperature levels. The findings, which distinguishes available (resource) and accessible (useful) excess heat potentials, indicate an annual total EU28 available potential of ~21 PJ, characterised by a certain degree of seasonal temporality, and corresponding accessible potentials of ~40 PJ per year at 3rd generation distribution, and of ~31 PJ at anticipated 4th generation conditions. Despite lower accessible volumes, utilisation in 4th generation systems are naturally more energy efficient, since relatively less electricity is used in the recovery process, but also more cost-effective, since heat pumps, at lower temperatures, can be operated at capacities closer to design conditions and with less annual deviations.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Conference_presentation
  • 30.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Economic benefits of fourth generation district heating2020Ingår i: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 193, artikel-id 116727Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The main impetus for lower distribution temperatures in district heating systems is the lower heat supply costs obtained by these lower temperatures. In this paper, the differences in heat supply costs for two different temperature levels have been estimated for various future heat supply options. The estimations were obtained by modelling a district heating system characterised by typical climate conditions for Central Europe. High sensitivity to lower supply costs from lower temperatures was found for geothermal heat, industrial excess heat, and heat pumps, whereas low cost sensitivity was estimated for combined heat and power plants using waste or biomass. Lower heat distribution loss constitutes a minor component of the total cost reductions. The current use of high heat distribution temperatures was identified as an important barrier for the transition to renewable and recycled heat supply in district heating systems. Hence, lower distribution temperatures would facilitate this required transition because lower distribution temperatures provide higher profitability for these renewable and recycled heat sources. © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 31.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Efficient heat distribution in solar district heating systems2018Ingår i: SDH Solar District Heating: Proceeding, 2018, s. 63-66Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contains a short analysis showing the main benefit for solar district heating when a novel heat distribution concept with low temperatures is applied. The analysis is performed by comparing the annual solar heat output from a solar collector field for current heat distribution temperatures in Sweden with the corresponding output for the novel heat distribution concept. The results show that the new low temperature concept provides 66% more solar heat for a typical solar collector. Hereby, the solar collector field can be reduced with 40%, giving a corresponding cost reduction for solar heat generated. Another result is that the cost gradient for lower costs from lower return temperatures is five times higher for solar district heating compared to current heat supply in Swedish district heating systems. One major conclusion is that high heat distribution temperatures in current European district heating systems are a major barrier for the competitiveness of solar district heating.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Essential improvements in future district heating systems2017Ingår i: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 116, s. 217-225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The major common denominator for future efficient fourth generation district heating systems is lower temperature levels in the distribution networks. Higher efficiencies are then obtained in both heat supply and heat distribution. Heat supply becomes more efficient with respect to combined heat and power, flue gas condensation, heat pumps, geothermal extraction, low temperature excess heat, and heat storage. Heat distribution becomes more efficient from lower distribution losses, less pipe expansion, lower scalding risks, and plastic pipes. The lower temperature levels will be possible since future buildings will have lower temperature demands when requiring lower heat demands. This paper aims at providing seven essential recommendations concerning design and construction strategies for future fourth generation systems. The method used is based on a critical examination of the barriers for lower temperature levels and the origins of high return temperatures in contemporary third generation systems. The two main research questions applied are: Which parts of contemporary system design are undesirable? Which possible improvements are desirable? Key results and the corresponding recommendations include temperature levels for heat distribution, recirculation, metering, supervision, thermal lengths for heat exchangers and heat sinks, hydronic balancing, and legionella. The main conclusion is that it should be possible to construct new fourth generation district heating networks according to these seven essential recommendations presented in this paper. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Framtida fjärrvärmeteknik: Möjligheter med en fjärde teknikgeneration2017Rapport (Refereegranskat)
  • 34.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Novel low temperature heat distribution technology2018Ingår i: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 145, s. 526-539Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Lower future heat demands and lower availability of non-fossil high temperature heat supply are expected future market conditions that restrain the long-term viability of contemporary district heating systems. Hence, current district heating technology should be enhanced to increase system performance in new heat distribution areas. This paper aims to outline a proposal for technical improvements required to achieve lower annual average return temperatures in new residential buildings to improve viability in future market conditions. The proposed technical solution consists of three principle changes: three-pipe distribution networks, apartment substations, and longer thermal lengths for heat exchangers. The three technical modifications aims at addressing system embedded temperature errors. Furthermore, a simulation model was developed to assess the proposed technical solution concerning different energy performances of buildings and different thermal lengths in heat exchangers. The results show that implementation of the three technical modifications reaches time-weighted annual average return temperatures of 17–21 °C with supply temperatures of about 50 °C. The results also verify the increased necessity to separate the network return flows into delivery and recirculation flows in residential substations as energy performance in buildings increase.

  • 35.
    Averfalk, Helge
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Werner, Sven
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Felsmann, Clemens
    Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Rühling, Karin
    Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Wiltshire, Robin
    Building Research Establishment (BRE), Garston, Watford, United Kingdom.
    Svendsen, Svend
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Li, Hongwei
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Faessler, Jérôme
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Floriane, Mermoud
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Quiquerez, Loïc
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Transformation Roadmap from High to Low Temperature District Heating Systems: Annex XI final report2017Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Ladda ner (pdf)
    summary
  • 36.
    Barth, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Holmén, Magnus
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    The use and abuse of 3D printing - Towards a mobile business model framework2019Ingår i: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, E-ISSN 2248-9622, Vol. 9, nr 11, s. 1-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aim to clarify changes in user activities and behaviour across different types of actors following the development of 3D printers. It proposes a mobile business model and outlining the features of development for direct digital manufacturing.

    The exploratory study show that the use of 3D printing a) lowers the knowledge and resource barriers for experimentation and entrepreneurial entry, b) increases product and concept prototyping in product development, c) provides a potential for business model innovation by expanding the boundaries of the firm upstream and downstream, and d) becomes a ticket for entrepreneurial entry

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Bauhn, Lovisa
    et al.
    Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Christian
    Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fleischer, Siegfried
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Mattsson, Marie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    On the spot study reveals the missing carbon sink2017Ingår i: / [ed] Martin Novak, 2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing amount of CO2 emitted from human activities globally does not add to the increase in the atmosphere. Taking the ocean sink into acount, the fate of about 3 Gt C annually remains to be explained. This huge amount is calculated as the residual from known fluxes1 We present an `on the spot´ study that is based on systematic soil sampling in different regions and over the years since 2004. The difference between gross heterotrophic respiration (GHR) in the soil, and net heterotrophic respiration (NHR) that is the part of the carbon dioxide leaving the ground surface, was analyzed. The accumulated data indicate a within-soil CO2 sink of the same magnitude as the sink derived from different fluxes1 . Both approaches describe the same sink but our results show that the sink is CO2 uptake from the soil atmosphere, not emitted CO2 that is returned to some unknown area on land. The energy yield needed from nitrification to explain the observed reduction of CO2 to organic material is large, and NH4 + is recycled several times. It was unexpectedly observed that O2 was released in this gross nitrification cycle and this was confirmed with H2 18O incubations in soils2 . The large CO2 sink changes between seasons, between sites and even from a sink to an additional source, which may explain why it has so long been ”missing”.

    1 Le Quéré et al. 2015. Global Carbon Budgets 2015. Earth Syst. Sci. Data 7, 349–396

    2 Fleischer S. et al. 2013. Dark oxidation of water in soils. Tellus B 65, 20490

  • 38.
    Bergman, Martin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lundeholm, Linda
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Material & Surface design methodology—the user study framework2020Ingår i: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, E-ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 8, nr 4, artikel-id 044001Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A material and surface selection within the car industry is usually based on a comprehensive study based on sensation and perception, focusing on particular perceived qualities and impressions (emotional functions) through visual and tactile interaction of plastic surfaces. On top of that ‘emotional function’, the ‘technical function’ such as surface roughness or gloss for a certain matter in symbiosis, will result in a number of material and surface proposals. The range of materials fitting into the window of these requirements varies depending on the industry’s ability to hit the target specified in regard to the ‘emotional functions’, usually defined by the designer’s intention. Thus, to be able to get a deeper understanding of how to frame the ‘emotional functions’ and link them to the ‘technical functions’, two user studies were made in this paper. The user studies were made with two different designs however with the same main research target to be able to understand the varieties of these two. The aim of doing so was to be able to find the user study design that was the most time efficient and providing the most significant data linked to the ‘technical functions’ and process control/traceability. However also finding the user study design with the least strains for the participating users in regard to uninterrupted brain activity. By designing the user study in relevant subsets in a certain sequence, user study design nr 2 has proven to be more time efficient and provide more data regarding the soft metrology. Future work will focus on deeper knowledge about how these surfaces different material- and surface properties correlate to the participants responses regarding perceived quality of a car interior design. The development of a new non-contact measurement is also discussed, enabling the possibility to complement and improve the hard metrology set up. © 2020 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 39.
    Bergman, Stefan
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & RandD centre Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). RandD centre Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Aili, Katarina
    RandD centre Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden & RandD centre Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 7, nr 2, s. 1645-1646Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Berrimi, Chihab Eddine
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Chaparala, Anish
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    A STUDY ON THE SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY AND DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING: THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE ORIENTATION AND DIFFERENT PRINT SETTINGS2017Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (magisterexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    The ease of manufacturing complex geometries using fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D-Printing reduces the overall production cost compared with the traditional manufacturing techniques. Because of the benefits of 3D printing technologies, it is proposed to be used in the manufacturing of different products. But there is still no definite characterization of the surface quality of objects manufactured by 3D printing. Hence in order to define the texture of the surfaces produced, measurements from different samples are taken and quantified.In this study, a 3D test model consisting of various slopes is printed at different layer thicknesses and different print speeds using different 3D printers.Thus, the effect of the surface orientation on the surface roughness was studied in relation to the different layer thicknesses and different print speeds. The study samples are measured using the state of the art equipment at Halmstad University.This thesis studies the surface roughness at different slopes of FDM models.A related study on the dimensional variation between the CAD model and the actual3D printed model, and causes/reasons for the variations are analyzed.It is observed that FDM produced part surface topography is directly affected by the orientation of the surface. Also, the surface roughness increases with increase in layer thickness. The observed correlations between surface roughness and layer thickness and surface orientation could be used to better understand the behavior of FDM surfaces, thus to better quantify the surface roughness. To improve quality, it must first be quantified. It is well observed that dimensional inaccuracy exists between the CAD model and the printed part. These results suggest that there is a lot of work and improvements to be done in order to close the gap of dimensional inaccuracy and achieve a high precision commercial FDM 3Dprinting.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Biurrun, Idoia
    et al.
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Pielech, Remigiusz
    Uniwersytet Rolniczy im. Hugona Kollataja w Krakowie, Krakow, Poland; Foundation for Biodiversity Research, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Dembicz, Iwona
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland; Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Gillet, François
    Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Besancon, France.
    Kozub, Łukasz
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland.
    Marcenò, Corrado
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain; Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Reitalu, Triin
    Tallinna Tehnikaülikool, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Van Meerbeek, Koenraad
    KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Guarino, Riccardo
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Chytrý, Milan
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pakeman, Robin J.
    The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Preislerová, Zdenka
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Axmanová, Irena
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Burrascano, Sabina
    Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy.
    Bartha, Sándor
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Boch, Steffen
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Københavns Universitet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Conradi, Timo
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Universiteit Gent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Essl, Franz
    Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Filibeck, Goffredo
    Università degli Studi della Tuscia Viterbo, Viterbo, Italy.
    Hájek, Michal
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Kuzemko, Anna
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Molnár, Zsolt
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Pärtel, Meelis
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Pätsch, Ricarda
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Prentice, Honor C.
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Roleček, Jan
    Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.
    Sutcliffe, Laura M. E.
    Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Gottingen, Germany.
    Terzi, Massimo
    CNR Istituto di Bioscienze e Biorisorse, Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Winkler, Manuela
    Osterreichische Akademie Der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria; Universitat fur Bodenkultur Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Wu, Jianshuang
    Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Aćić, Svetlana
    University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Acosta, Alicia T. R.
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy.
    Afif, Elias
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Akasaka, Munemitsu
    Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Japan.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Aleffi, Michele
    Università degli Studi di Camerino, Camerino, Italy.
    Aleksanyan, Alla
    National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia.
    Ali, Arshad
    Hebei University, Baoding, China.
    Apostolova, Iva
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Ashouri, Parvaneh
    Agricultural Research, Education & Extension Organization, Iran, Tehran, Iran.
    Bátori, Zoltán
    Szegedi Tudományegyetem (SZTE), Szeged, Hungary.
    Baumann, Esther
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Becker, Thomas
    Universitat Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Belonovskaya, Elena
    Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Benito Alonso, José Luis
    JOLUBE Consultor Botánico, Jaca, Spain.
    Berastegi, Asun
    Environmental Management of Navarre, Pamplona, Spain.
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Bhatta, Kuber Prasad
    Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bonini, Ilaria
    Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Büchler, Marc-Olivier
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Budzhak, Vasyl
    Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi, Ukraine.
    Bueno, Álvaro
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Buldrini, Fabrizio
    Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Campos, Juan Antonio
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Cancellieri, Laura
    Università degli Studi della Tuscia Viterbo, Viterbo, Italy.
    Carboni, Marta
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy.
    Ceulemans, Tobias
    KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Chiarucci, Alessandro
    Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Chocarro, Cristina
    Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Conti, Luisa
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy; Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic; Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
    Csergő, Anna Mária
    Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Godollo, Hungary.
    Cykowska-Marzencka, Beata
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Wladyslaw Szafer Institute of Botany of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.
    Czarniecka-Wiera, Marta
    Instytut Technologiczno-Przyrodniczy, Warsaw, Poland; University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Czarnocka-Cieciura, Marta
    National Information Processing Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
    Czortek, Patryk
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland.
    Danihelka, Jiří
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic; Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.
    de Bello, Francesco
    Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
    Deák, Balázs
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Demeter, László
    National Agency for Protected Areas, Miercurea-Ciuc, Romania.
    Deng, Lei
    Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China.
    Diekmann, Martin
    Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Dolezal, Jiri
    Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic; Jihočeská Univerzita v Českých Budějovicích, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Dolnik, Christian
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Dřevojan, Pavel
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Dupré, Cecilia
    Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Ecker, Klaus
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Ejtehadi, Hamid
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Erschbamer, Brigitta
    Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Etayo, Javier
    I.E.S. Zizur Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
    Etzold, Jonathan
    ESTOK UG, Bernau (bei Berlin), Germany.
    Farkas, Tünde
    Nemzeti Park Igazgatóságok, Hungary, Kecskemet, Hungary.
    Farzam, Mohammad
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Fayvush, George
    National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia.
    Fernández Calzado, María Rosa
    Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Farmacia, Granada, Spain.
    Finckh, Manfred
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Fjellstad, Wendy
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Fotiadis, Georgios
    Geoponiko Panepistimion Athinon, Athens, Greece.
    García-Magro, Daniel
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    García-Mijangos, Itziar
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Gavilán, Rosario G.
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Germany, Markus
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Ghafari, Sahar
    University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Giusso del Galdo, Gian Pietro
    Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Grytnes, John-Arvid
    Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Güler, Behlül
    Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi, Izmir, Turkey.
    Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Helm, Aveliina
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Herrera, Mercedes
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Hüllbusch, Elisabeth M.
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Ingerpuu, Nele
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Jandt, Ute
    Martin-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Janišová, Monika
    Institute of Botany Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Jeanneret, Philippe
    Forschungsanstalt Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jeltsch, Florian
    Universität Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Jensen, Kai
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Jentsch, Anke
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Kącki, Zygmunt
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Kakinuma, Kaoru
    Shanghai University, Shanghai, China.
    Kapfer, Jutta
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Kargar, Mansoureh
    Natural Resources and Watershed Management Administration of Alborz Province, Karaj, Iran.
    Kelemen, András
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Kiehl, Kathrin
    Fachhochschule Osnabrück, Osnabruck, Germany.
    Kirschner, Philipp
    Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Koyama, Asuka
    Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Langer, Nancy
    Stiftung Naturschutzfonds Brandenburg, Potsdam, Germany.
    Lazzaro, Lorenzo
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Lepš, Jan
    Jihočeská Univerzita v Českých Budějovicích, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Li, Ching-Feng
    National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Li, Frank Yonghong
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Liendo, Diego
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löbel, Swantje
    Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Lomba, Angela
    Universidade do Porto, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Fornelo e Vairao, Portugal.
    Lososová, Zdeňka
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Lustyk, Pavel
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Luzuriaga, Arantzazu L.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Ma, Wenhong
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Maccherini, Simona
    Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Magnes, Martin
    Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Malicki, Marek
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland; Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wrocław, Poland.
    Manthey, Michael
    Universität Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Mardari, Constantin
    Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza, Iasi, Romania.
    May, Felix
    Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Meier, Eliane Seraina
    Forschungsanstalt Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Memariani, Farshid
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Merunková, Kristina
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Michelsen, Ottar
    Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universitet, Trondheim, Norway.
    Molero Mesa, Joaquín
    Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Farmacia, Granada, Spain.
    Moradi, Halime
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Moysiyenko, Ivan
    Kherson State University, Kherson, Ukraine.
    Mugnai, Michele
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Naqinezhad, Alireza
    University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran.
    Natcheva, Rayna
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Ninot, Josep M.
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Nobis, Marcin
    Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Krakow, Poland.
    Noroozi, Jalil
    Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Nowak, Arkadiusz
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; Uniwersytet Opolski, Opole, Poland.
    Onipchenko, Vladimir
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Palpurina, Salza
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria; National Museum of Natural History Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Pauli, Harald
    Osterreichische Akademie Der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria; Universitat fur Bodenkultur Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Pedashenko, Hristo
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Pedersen, Christian
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Peet, Robert K.
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, United States.
    Pérez-Haase, Aaron
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat de Vic - Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVic-UCC), Vic, Spain.
    Peters, Jan
    Michael Succow Foundation, Greifswald, Germany.
    Pipenbaher, Nataša
    Univerza v Mariboru, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Pirini, Chrisoula
    School of Biology, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pladevall-Izard, Eulàlia
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Plesková, Zuzana
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Potenza, Giovanna
    Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
    Rahmanian, Soroor
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Rodríguez-Rojo, Maria Pilar
    Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real, Spain.
    Ronkin, Vladimir
    V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine.
    Rosati, Leonardo
    Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
    Ruprecht, Eszter
    Universitatea Babeș-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
    Rusina, Solvita
    Latvijas Universitāte, Riga, Latvia.
    Sabovljević, Marko
    University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Sanaei, Anvar
    Shenyang Institute of Applied Ecology Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Sánchez, Ana M.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Santi, Francesco
    Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Savchenko, Galina
    V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine.
    Sebastià, Maria Teresa
    Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
    Shyriaieva, Dariia
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Silva, Vasco
    Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Škornik, Sonja
    Univerza v Mariboru, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Šmerdová, Eva
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sonkoly, Judit
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary; MTA-DE Lendület Functional and Restoration Ecology Research Group, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sperandii, Marta Gaia
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy; CSIC-GV-UV - Centro de Investigaciones sobre Desertificación, Moncada, Spain.
    Staniaszek-Kik, Monika
    University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Stevens, Carly
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Stifter, Simon
    EURAC Research, Bolzano, Italy.
    Suchrow, Sigrid
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Swacha, Grzegorz
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Świerszcz, Sebastian
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.
    Talebi, Amir
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Teleki, Balázs
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Tichý, Lubomír
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Tölgyesi, Csaba
    Szegedi Tudományegyetem (SZTE), Szeged, Hungary.
    Torca, Marta
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Török, Péter
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary; MTA-DE Lendület Functional and Restoration Ecology Research Group, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Tsarevskaya, Nadezda
    Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Tsiripidis, Ioannis
    School of Biology, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Turisová, Ingrid
    Matej Bel University, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Ushimaru, Atushi
    Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.
    Valkó, Orsolya
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Van Mechelen, Carmen
    PXL University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Vanneste, Thomas
    Universiteit Gent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vasheniak, Iuliia
    Vasyl' Stus Donetsk National University, Vinnytsia, Ukraine.
    Vassilev, Kiril
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Viciani, Daniele
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Villar, Luis
    Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Virtanen, Risto
    University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Vitasović-Kosić, Ivana
    University of Zagreb, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Vojtkó, András
    Eszterhazy Karoly University, Heves County, Hungary.
    Vynokurov, Denys
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Waldén, Emelie
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yun
    Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Görlitz, Germany.
    Weiser, Frank
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Wen, Lu
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Wesche, Karsten
    German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Görlitz, Germany; Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    White, Hannah
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Widmer, Stefan
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Wolfrum, Sebastian
    Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan für Ernährung, Landnutzung und Umwelt, Freising, Germany; Institute for Organic Farming, Freising, Germany.
    Wróbel, Anna
    Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Krakow, Poland.
    Yuan, Zuoqiang
    Shenyang Institute of Applied Ecology Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Zelený, David
    National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zhao, Liqing
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Dengler, Jürgen
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Benchmarking plant diversity of Palaearctic grasslands and other open habitats2021Ingår i: Journal of Vegetation Science, ISSN 1100-9233, E-ISSN 1654-1103, Vol. 32, nr 4, artikel-id e13050Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Journal of Vegetation Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Association for Vegetation Science.Aims: Understanding fine-grain diversity patterns across large spatial extents is fundamental for macroecological research and biodiversity conservation. Using the GrassPlot database, we provide benchmarks of fine-grain richness values of Palaearctic open habitats for vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens and complete vegetation (i.e., the sum of the former three groups). Location: Palaearctic biogeographic realm. Methods: We used 126,524 plots of eight standard grain sizes from the GrassPlot database: 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 m2 and calculated the mean richness and standard deviations, as well as maximum, minimum, median, and first and third quartiles for each combination of grain size, taxonomic group, biome, region, vegetation type and phytosociological class. Results: Patterns of plant diversity in vegetation types and biomes differ across grain sizes and taxonomic groups. Overall, secondary (mostly semi-natural) grasslands and natural grasslands are the richest vegetation type. The open-access file ”GrassPlot Diversity Benchmarks” and the web tool “GrassPlot Diversity Explorer” are now available online (https://edgg.org/databases/GrasslandDiversityExplorer) and provide more insights into species richness patterns in the Palaearctic open habitats. Conclusions: The GrassPlot Diversity Benchmarks provide high-quality data on species richness in open habitat types across the Palaearctic. These benchmark data can be used in vegetation ecology, macroecology, biodiversity conservation and data quality checking. While the amount of data in the underlying GrassPlot database and their spatial coverage are smaller than in other extensive vegetation-plot databases, species recordings in GrassPlot are on average more complete, making it a valuable complementary data source in macroecology. © 2021 The Authors.

  • 42.
    Bodin, Hristina
    et al.
    Division of Natural Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Weisner, Stefan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Attenuation of Pharmaceutical Substances: Phytoremediation using Constructed Wetlands2018Ingår i: 13th Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Europe Chapter Meeting: Management of Wetland Ecosystem Services: Issues, Challenges and Solutions, 2018, s. 19-22Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Currently, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) do not efficiently remove pharmaceutical substances (PS). Thus, such substances are now frequently found in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Also, concentrations of some PS in treated effluents exceed Environmental Quality Standards proposed by EU legislation. One resource-efficient option for increasing PS removal in WWTP effluents is to use constructed wetlands (CWs) as an attenuation step (Breitholtz et al. 2012; Li et al. 2014). However, very little research has been done on how to maximize the PS attenuation capacity of CWs. Therefore, a project with the aim to investigate reduction of different pharmaceutical substances in CWs with different vegetation compositions and water depths, was performed at the Experimental Wetland Area (EVA) located 20 km north of Halmstad, Sweden. 

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  • 43.
    Bonnot, N. C.
    et al.
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, 730 91, Sweden.
    Bergvall, U. A.
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, 730 91, Sweden.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Kjellander, P.
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, 730 91, Sweden.
    Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?: Variation in the stress response among personalities and populations in a large wild herbivore2018Ingår i: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 188, nr 1, s. 85-95Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Faced with rapid environmental changes, individuals may express different magnitude and plasticity in their response to a given stressor. However, little is known about the causes of variation in phenotypic plasticity of the stress response in wild populations. In the present study, we repeatedly captured individual roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from two wild populations in Sweden exposed to differing levels of predation pressure and measured plasma concentrations of stress-induced cortisol and behavioral docility. While controlling for the marked effects of habituation, we found clear between-population differences in the stress-induced cortisol response. Roe deer living in the area that was recently recolonized by lynx (Lynx lynx) and wolves (Canis lupus) expressed cortisol levels that were around 30% higher than roe deer in the human-dominated landscape free of large carnivores. In addition, for the first time to our knowledge, we investigated the stress-induced cortisol response in free-ranging newborn fawns and found no evidence for hypo-responsiveness during early life in this species. Indeed, stress-induced cortisol levels were of similar magnitude and differed between populations to a similar extent in both neonates and adults. Finally, at an individual level, we found that both cortisol and docility levels were strongly repeatable, and weakly negatively inter-correlated, suggesting that individuals differed consistently in how they respond to a stressor, and supporting the existence of a stress-management syndrome in roe deer. © 2018, The Author(s).

  • 44.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Forslind, K.
    Lund University, Lund and Helsingborg, Sweden & Helsingborg's hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Eberhardt, K.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, M.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Devlopment Centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Functional Impairment in Patients with RA in an Eight Year Perspective2017Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, nr Suppl. 2, s. 1513-1514Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In people with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) impaired physical functioning is an acute as well as long term effect of the disease. Observational performance tests reflecting range of motion in upper as well as in lower extremities should be easy to perform in the clinic as well as in research as a complement to self-reported measures of physical functioning. The Signal Of Functional Impairment (SOFI)1 is a performance test which so far has been applied only in Sweden but commonly used in the clinic and in long term follow-up clinical studies.

    Objectives: The aim was to study performance-based function assessed with SOFI over 8 years and, secondly, to study which items included in SOFI that were associated with change in functioning over time.

    Methods: An inception cohort of 1 052 patients with early RA, from the BARFOT-study, recruited 1992–2006 was investigated, mean (SD) age was 54 years (14), 70% were women. The patients were followed by a structured protocol at baseline, 3 and 6 months and at 1, 2, 5, and 8 years. SOFI consists of 3 parts measuring hand, arm (upper), and leg (lower) function (1). Hand function is tested by 4 movements; cylinder grip (H1), pen grip (H2), pincer grip (H3) and opposition of the thumb (H4). Arm function is assessed by 3 movements; hand behind the head and the ability to touch the cervical spine processes with fingers (A1), elbow supination (A2) and elbow extension (A3). Leg function is tested by 4 movements; the ability to touch the opposite knee with the heel while sitting (L1), knee extension in supine position (L2), dorsiflexion of the foot standing on a balance board (L3), and the ability to stand on tip toes without shoes (L4). An assessor scores the patient's ability to perform the different tests on an ordinal scale (0=normal, 1= partly impaired and 2= unable to perform). The range of SOFI scores is 0–44 (best to worst).

    Results: At baseline the mean (SD) SOFI was 7.2 (5.8), and at 1 year follow-up the improvement was 2.75 (5.65), p<0.001. From 1 year to 8 year follow-up the deterioration was 1.5 (4.6), p<0.001. When studying hand, upper and lower function separately, the pen grip and the ability to stand on tip toes improves most during the first year. From 1 to 8 year the pincer grip and the ability to stand on tip toes are the items that deteriorate most (Figure). Assessment of the pen grip, the pincer grip and the ability to stand on tip toes explain 58% to 70% of the SOFI score over time, with the highest rate at 5 (65%) and 8 years follow-up (70%).

    Conclusions: Functioning as assessed by SOFI improved during the first year in patients with early RA and then deteriorated slowly. Over a longer period, pincer grip and the ability to stand on tip toes seemed to be the two most important items to measure when assessing functional impairment over time. © 2017, BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  • 45.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Forslind, Kristina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Eberhardt, Kerstin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria L. E.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Importance of Measuring Hand and Foot Function Over the Disease Course in Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Eight-Year Follow-Up Study2019Ingår i: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 71, nr 2, s. 166-172Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess function using the Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI) instrument over 8 years, to study clinical variables associated with the change, and to study change over time of the SOFI items.

    Methods: In total, 1,223 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the Better Anti-Rheumatic Farmacotherapy (BARFOT) cohort (mean ± SD age 56.9 ± 15.4 years, 67% women) were included in the analysis. Data from baseline and from 1 and 8 years were studied. The SOFI instrument includes measures of range of motion in the hand, shoulder/arm, and lower extremity (range 0–44, best to worst). The effects of baseline variables (sociodemographic, disease activity, joint destruction, and function) on change in SOFI scores were studied by linear regression analysis.

    Results: During the first year, the improvement in mean ± SD SOFI scores was 2.7 ± 5.7 (P < 0.001). Worse scores in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints and Health Assessment Questionnaire score at baseline were associated with this improvement (r2 <= 0.11). During the next 7 years, the deterioration in SOFI scores was mean ± SD 1.5 ± 4.9 (P < 0.001). Based on change scores, we found that finger flexion, pincer grip, and toe-standing were the most important items to measure, explaining 58-61% of the total SOFI score, and these items were also associated with radiographic changes at the 8-year follow-up.

    Conclusion: Function as assessed with SOFI scores improved during the first year in patients with early RA, but it deteriorated slowly thereafter. Impaired hand and foot function was associated with joint destruction at the 8-year follow-up. Measures of hand and foot function will complement self-reported and medical data, both in clinical work and in long-term research studies. Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

  • 46.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden & R&D centre, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). R&D centre, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden & R&D centre, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Primary Health Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Measures of Physical Activity and Fear Avoidance in People with Chronic Pain2018Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, nr Suppl. 2, s. 1829-1830, artikel-id SAT0737-HPRArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Lifestyle factors such as physical activity (PA) has the possibility to contribute to improved health and quality of life in the population as well as in chronic diseases. Most often PA is self-reported while measures of the aerobic capacity are more seldom measured in subjects with chronic pain.

    Objectives To describe physical activity levels (self-reported and aerobic capacity) in people with chronic pain classified as regional or widespread and to compare the findings with a group that report no pain.

    Methods From the 2016 follow-up of the Swedish population based Epipain cohort (n 1321), 146 subjects were invited to a clinical assessment where the aerobic capacity was assessed by using a submaximal bicycle test, the Ekblom-Bak test, together with assessment of the Borg scale for perceived exertion (RPE). Aerobic capacity was also classified as low, average or high according to data from the general population. Self-reported physical activity was coded as MVPArec if recommended levels of PA was reported (physically active on a moderate level ≥150 min/week (MPA) or on an vigorous level ≥75 min/week (VPA) or not). The Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire for PA (FABQ-PA, 0–24 best to worst) and for work (FABQ-W, 0–48 best to worst) were also assessed. The participants were classified as having chronic widespread pain (CWP), chronic regional pain (CRP) or no chronic pain (NCP) based on a pain mannequin presenting 0–18 pain regions and if pain had lasted for 3 months or more. Chi2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to study differences between the three pain groups.

    Results 141/146 (97%) subjects (mean (SD) age 59.4 (8.2) years) whereof 61% were women, could be classified into pain groups; 43 as CWP (84% women), 43 as CRP (42% women) and 55 as NCP (58% women). The group with CWP was slightly older than those with CRP (mean (SD) age 57.0 (7.6) years vs. 61.9 (6.9) years, p 0.02). The CWP group also had lower aerobic capacity (mean (SD) 2.2 (0.5) l/min vs. 2.6 (0.6) l/min, p 0.03), and a larger proportion was classified as having low aerobic capacity (CWP 21%, CRP 7% and NCP 10%, p 0.04). The proportion of MVPArec did not differ between the groups; CWP 70%, CRP 81% and NCP 74% (p 0.5). There was neither a difference between the groups in BMI, RPE or in sitting hours/week (p>0.6). However, differences were found in the FABQ where in the PA scale those with CRP had worse scores compared with NCP (mean (SD) 11.2 (7.3) vs. 6.0 (6.0), p<0.001), the difference between CWP (mean (SD) 8.9 (6.7)) and NCP was p 0.06. In the work subscale of FABQ, CWP had worse scores compared with CRP (mean (SD) 18.9 (15.7) vs. 10.0 (12.5), p 0.002) and CRP had worse scores compared to those with NCP (mean (SD) 10.0 (12.5) vs. 6.5 (9.1), p<0.001).

    Conclusions In this sample of subjects with chronic pain or no pain, having widespread pain tended to affect the aerobic capacity negatively while self-reports of reaching recommended levels of physical activity did not differ between groups. Fear avoidance in relation to physical activity and especially in relation to work was more noticeable in subjects with chronic pain compared to those with no pain. Measures of aerobic capacity and information of fear avoidance beliefs might help health professionals to better tailor the non-pharmacological treatment for subjects with chronic pain.

    Disclosure of Interest None declared

    © 2018, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.

  • 47.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ndosi, M.
    University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    The Educational Needs of Patients with Undifferentiated Spondyloarthritis2017Ingår i: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, nr Suppl. 2, s. 1495-1496Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 48.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden & Primary Health Care Unit, Department ofPublic Health and Community Medicine,Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ndosi, Mwidimi E.
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    The educational needs of patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis: Validation of the ENAT questionnaire and needs assessment2018Ingår i: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 313-317Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to validate the Swedish version of the educational needs assessment tool (SwENAT) in undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) and use it to study the educational needs of patients with USpA.

    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study, recruiting a random sample of patients with USpA from a hospital register in Sweden. Educational needs data were collected, together with disease activity and function indices (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index [BASDAI] and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index [BASFI]). Rasch analysis was utilized to evaluate the construct validity, internal consistency and unidimensionality of the SwENAT before studying differences in educational needs between patient subgroups (gender, age and disease severity).

    RESULTS: = 11.488; p = 0.119), including strict unidimensionality. Overall, the mean (SD) SwENAT score was 86 (32). Women reported higher needs than men in the domains of pain (mean [SD] 13.1 [6.8] versus 10.1 [6.0]; p = 0.05); movement (mean [SD] 13.0 [5.5] versus 9.9 [5.7]; p = 0.02) and self-help (mean [SD] 17.0 [5.8] versus 14.1 [5.0]; p = 0.03). Higher disease activity (BASDAI >4) was associated with higher educational needs (mean [SD] 92.6 [31.9] versus 73.7 [29.4]; p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the SwENAT is valid in USpA. Women and patients with higher disease activity are more likely to have high levels of educational needs, so special attention and strategies to target patient education are warranted. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 49.
    Bried, Jason
    et al.
    Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, USA.
    Ries, Leslie
    Department of Biology at Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Towards Global Volunteer Monitoring of Odonate Abundance2020Ingår i: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 70, nr 10, s. 914-923Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects are reportedly experiencing widespread declines, but we generally have sparse data on their abundance. Correcting this shortfall will take more effort than professional entomologists alone can manage. Volunteer nature enthusiasts can greatly help to monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata), iconic freshwater sentinels and one of the few nonpollinator insect groups appreciated by the public and amenable to citizen science. Although counting individual odonates is common in some locations, current data will not enable a global perspective on odonate abundance patterns and trends. Borrowing insight from butterfly monitoring efforts, we outline basic plans for a global volunteer network to count odonates, including organizational structure, advertising and recruiting, and data collection, submission, and synthesis. We hope our proposal serves as a catalyst for richer coordinated efforts to understand population trends of odonates and other insects in the Anthropocene. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

  • 50.
    Bååth, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Rydberglaboratoriet för tillämpad naturvetenskap (RLAS).
    Mantovani, F.
    Istituto di Radioastronomia del C.N.R., Bologna, Italy.
    Rantakyrö, F.T.
    Istituto di Radioastronomia del C.N.R., Bologna, Italy.
    High resolution interferometry of the QSO 1422+2021997Ingår i: Astronomy and Astrophysics. Supplement Series, ISSN 1286-4846, Vol. 125, nr 1, s. 453-458Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We present VLA A-array observations at 8.4 and 15GHz and European VLBI Network (EVN) observations at 1.6GHz of the radio source 1422+202. It is suggested that 1422+202 is a Medium-size Object in the evolutionary sequence from Compact Steep-spectrum Sources to larger sized radio sources. The VLBI data were analysed with the phase referencing technique and we show that the EVN can work as a phase stable instrument for separations between the calibrator source and the target source up to ~ 10 degrees. With the VLA and VLBI observations we investigate some of the issues about the nucleus of 1422+202 and we discuss the possible cause for the low frequency variability detected while monitoring the source.

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