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  • 1.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden & University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Syddansk Universitet, Graasten, Danmark.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that sleep problems may be an important predictor for chronic widespread pain (CWP). With this study we investigated both sleep problems and fatigue as predictors for the onset of CWP over a 5-year and an 18-year perspective in a population free from CWP at baseline.

    Methods: To get a more stable classification of CWP, we used a wash-out period, including only individuals who had not reported CWP at baseline (1998) and three years prior baseline (1995). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5-year follow-up and 791 entered for the 18-year follow-up. Difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue were investigated as predictors separately and simultaneously in binary logistic regression analyses.

    Results: The results showed that problems with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early awakening and non-restorative sleep predicted the onset of CWP over a 5-year (OR 1.85 to OR 2.27) and 18-year (OR 1.54 to OR 2.25) perspective irrespective of mental health (assessed by SF-36) at baseline. Also fatigue predicted the onset of CWP over the two-time perspectives (OR 3.70 and OR 2.36 respectively) when adjusting for mental health. Overall the effect of the sleep problems and fatigue on new onset CWP (over a 5-year perspective) was somewhat attenuated when adjusting for pain at baseline but remained significant for problems with early awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue. Problems with maintaining sleep predicted CWP 18 years later irrespective of mental health and number of pain regions (OR 1.72). Reporting simultaneous problems with all four aspects of sleep was associated with the onset of CWP over a five-year and 18-yearperspective, irrespective of age, gender, socio economy, mental health and pain at baseline. Sleep problems and fatigue predicted the onset of CWP five years later irrespective of each other.

    Conclusion: Sleep problems and fatigue were both important predictors for the onset of CWP over a five-year perspective. Sleep problems was a stronger predictor in a longer time-perspective. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality and fatigue in the clinic. © The Author(s). 2018

  • 2.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Working with an anxious and psychologically abused athlete: A mindful, neuropsychotherapy approach2014In: Neuropsychotherapy: Theoretical concepts and clinical applications / [ed] Rossouw, Pieter J., Brisbane: Mediros , 2014, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Hanrahan, Stephanie J.University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Doing exercise psychology2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Barney, Steve T.
    South Utah University, Cedar City, Utah, USA.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, Cambridge, Waikato, New Zealand.
    Mindfully Dynamic Meta-Supervision: The Case of AW and M2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 330-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, North Dunedin, New Zealand.
    A brief impressionistic history of paying attention: The roots of mindfulness2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 5-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Mechanisms of Exercise Dependence – A person centred approach to study the predictiveability of anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation on exercise dependence2017In: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J., & Jaenes, J.C., 2017, p. 537-538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise dependence is a maladaptive pattern of exercise with a craving for physical activity that results in extreme exercise that may generate mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Previous research suggests that individuals with certain personality traits are more prone to develop exercise dependence. However, research on personality traits and exercise dependence is still limited. In the current study, predictive abilities of anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation on exercise dependence were investigated. A longitudinal design was adopted to investigate if personality related factors could predict exercise dependence. The sample consisted of 206 regular exercisers (100 males and 106 females) from various exercise groups, sport clubs and sport science classes in Sweden (Mage = 28,5 years; SD = 9,97). The LPA (Latent Profile Analysis) showed that a model with two profiles provided best fit to the data, and that profile belonging at T1 could predict measures of exercise dependence at T2. Profile 1: “high risk exercisers” reported significantly higher levels of exercise dependence, anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation compared to Profile 2: “low risk exercisers”. This study highlights factors that may characterize people who develop exercise dependence. High-risk exercisers are obsessively passionate about their training and exercise may function as a tool to cope with anxiety. If the individual for some reason is prevented from training, feelings of anxiety and guilt are often experienced. Furthermore, these individuals tend to be self-conscious about how they look and appear to other people. To them, exercise may also work as a way to achieve body ideals. The results of the current study suggest plausible mechanisms of why exercise behaviours become unhealthy and uncontrollable for some exercisers whereas others manage to remain healthy.

  • 7.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and sports.
    Profiles of Exercise Dependence – A person centred approach to study potential mechanisms2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Who becomes exercise dependent? Exploring psychological risk factors for exercise dependence through a person centred approach2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Hertting, K. & Johnson, U., Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 65-66Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Career barriers in the National Hockey League: An inductive thematic analysis of first-hand data from Canadian professional ice hockey players2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were: (a) to examine the Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players’ internal and external barriers associated with the demands at each NHL career stage and status together with across-career barriers, and (b) to feature the Canadian NHL players’ barriers in the empirical career model. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees agreed to participate in conversational interviews before their transcripts underwent an interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects face draft year pressure and team camp anxiety. Rookies and sophomores deal with insecurity with teammates and roster spot uncertainty. Prime veterans have to manage ruminating over missed chances while seasoned veterans struggled with social connections. Across career stages and statuses, NHL players deal with career threatening injuries and conflicts with head coach. After discussing how these results contribute to the empirical career model of Canadian NHL players and also extend the career transition and maladaptation literatures, delimitations and future directions are proposed for sport psychology researchers.

  • 10.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Coping strategies and resources in the National Hockey League: An inductive thematic analysis with Canadian professional ice-hockey players2017In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 17-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canadian ice-hockey players must overcome numerous stressors throughout their National Hockey  League (NHL) careers. Though sport psychology researchers have conducted preliminary studies, theoretical restrictions, small participant numbers, and the use of a structured interview guide have limited breadth of knowledge. Our authors constructed a comprehensive empirical career model by eliciting 23 Canadian NHL players. The intent in the presentation is to feature the stressors, barriers, coping strategies and resources utilised at each status and career stage. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees agreed to participate in conversational interviews before their transcripts underwent an interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects seeking to gain entry into the NHL needed (a) realistic expectations of draft pressures, (b) training camp expectations, (c) identify the team’s needs, and (d) if demoted, readjust their expectations. Rookies developing  as NHL p layers needed a high compete level when called-up while sophomores developed by (a) knowing their opponents, (b) generating role player production, and (c) made friendships. Veterans seeking to be All-Stars coped by (a) practicing scoring and creating scoring chances, and (b) showing Stanley Cup determination. Seasoned veterans extended their careers by preserving their physique. The authors will discuss the practical applications for sport psychology consultants tasked with ensuring that professional ice-hockey players move effectively through career transitions including entering the NHL, developing as an NHL players, reaching the NHL elite, and maintaining NHL play involvement. The authors will also speak about teammates, coaches, and support staff hoping to be effective resources to their players’ career progression. © 2017 by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology 

  • 11.
    Bean, Corliss
    et al.
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Solstad, Bård Erlend
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Forneris, Tanya
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Longitudinal associations between perceived programme quality, basic needs support and basic needs satisfaction within youth sport: A person-centred approach2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging the importance of longitudinal data to test process-based psychological theories of motivation is critical. The purpose of this study was to use a person-centred approach to identify unique subgroups (i.e. profiles) of youth athletes based on their level of self-reported programme quality (PQ) and basic needs support mid-way through their sport season and investigate potential differences between the subgroups on their self-reported basic needs satisfaction at the end of the sport season. The current study involved 541 Canadian youth athletes (males n = 289; females n = 250; gender-fluid n = 2) within 52 sport programmes over the course of 18 months. Youthathletes ranged in age from 8 through 19 (M = 13.76, SD = 2.61). A latent profile analysis (LPA) in Mplus 8.0 was used to carry out the analyses. The LPA revealed three distinct profiles based on youth athletes’ levels of self-reported PQ and basic needs support. Specifically, athletes who perceived their sport experience to be of higher quality and supported their basic psychological needs midway through the sport season also reported higher levels of basic needs satisfaction at season end. Results from this study contribute to the field of sport psychology through understanding how basic needs theory contributes to the dimensions of programme quality and by informing recommendations for future coach education on how to satisfy youth athletes’ basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness through programmedelivery. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 12.
    Becker-Larsen, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    “Organizing for Excellence”: Stress-Recovery States in the Danish National Orienteering Team during a Training Camp and the 2015 World Championship2017In: Scandinavian Sports Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 87-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite athletes push themselves physically and psychologically to their limits in order to develop as athletes and to deliver top performances. To succeed, the athletes must manage their energy. This is particularly important in the periods of high demand on the athletes’ resources (Kellmann, Altenburg, Lormes, & Steinacker, 2001). These include training camps and competitions, because such events are generally intense and likely to induce increased stress, and their schedules often do not allow sufficient time for recovery (Elbe & Kellmann, 2007; Foster, Snyder, & Welsh, 1999). In 2015, the Danish national orienteering coach decided, as a new initiative, to include a three-week training camp in their preparation for the World Championship. The coach was aware that such a long period of intense focus on orienteering would require efficient energy management in the athletes. Therefore, the coach supported the research team in this study aimed at monitoring the athletes’ stress-recovery states during the preparatory camp and the World Championship, with further exploration of the athletes’ perceived sources of stress and recovery during the same period. From a research perspective, the present study is exclusive because of monitoring world-class athlete-participants during their preparation and participation in their most important event. From an applied perspective, searching for efficient processes for energy management during long-term training camps and competitions might become a frontier for improvement of athletes’ preparation and performance.

  • 13.
    Becker-Larsen, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    "Organizing for excellence": stress-recovery states in the Danish national orienteering team during a training camp and the 2015 World Championship2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 639-640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite level athletes are under considerable pressure to perform, why energy management is a natural part of the life of elite athletes. Energy management is particularly important during periods of high demand on their resources, such as during training camps and competitions, which are often intense and do not allow sufficient time for recovery. Research on recovery has mainly focused on individual physical and physiological strategies. In the 2015 World Championship, the Danish national orienteering team was the best nation, winning four gold medals. In the present study we examined: (a) the stress-recovery states of the Danish orienteers during a three-week preparatory training camp and the following 2015 World Championship, and (b) their perceived sources of stress and recovery during the two events. The study was designed as mixed-method with the RESTQ-sport questionnaire, semi-structured interviews, and a coach’s journal as the data sources used longitudinally during the camp and the championship. Results revealed: (a) well-balanced stress-recovery states among all athletes during the entire period; and (b) perceived sources of stress and recovery classified into organizational, social, personal, and athletic. The athletes themselves stated that their well-balanced stress-recovery states positively affected their learning, well-being, and performance. The organizational strategies played a key role in reducing athletes’ unnecessary stress and in facilitating individual recovery. We suggest that “organizing for excellence”, keeping in mind athletes' energy management, is a special task for coaches and managers when preparing for camps and competitions. 

  • 14.
    Bergström-Wuolo, Maya
    et al.
    Public Health Center, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    Health Counselor in Luleå, Luleå, Sweden.
    Hertting, Krister
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    My heart has no hurt: The health of young immigrants2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 290-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore health from the perspective of young immigrants in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach: A total of 25 newly arrived young immigrants attending Swedish language classes in northern Sweden participated by drawing and writing open letters. They continued the open-ended sentence “Now I’ll draw and describe a day when I was feeling good, that was […].”

    Findings: The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes: longing to be in control for a better life, searching for power in the good and the bad, and striving for a sense of belonging in the new society. The findings illuminate young immigrants’ perspectives of a health-promoting everyday life consisting of agency, reflection and a sense of community. The findings also highlight the young immigrants’ experiences when health-promoting aspects are lacking, characterized by disillusionment, anxiety and loneliness. The findings are discussed with health promotion, health literacy and young immigrants in mind.

    Practical implications: According to young immigrants, meeting basic needs such as food, sleep and housing is health promoting but easily taken for granted. Being able to have a say in matters concerning everyday life, social inclusion and finding power in memories – positive and negative – can promote health in young immigrants.

    Originality/value: The young immigrants were able to communicate via drawings and words to overcome language barriers. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 15.
    Billsten, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Robert
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) test used in the implementation of assessment instruments and treatment methods in a Swedish National study2018In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ISSN 0740-5472, E-ISSN 1873-6483, Vol. 84, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational climate and related factors are associated with outcome and are as such of vital interest for healthcare organizations. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) is the questionnaire used in the present study to assess the influence of organizational factors on implementation success. The respondents were employed in one of 203 Swedish municipalities within social work and psychiatric substance/abuse treatment services. They took part in a nationwide implementation project organized by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR), commissioned by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Aim The aims were: (a) to identify classes (clusters) of employees with different ORC profiles on the basis of data collected in 2011 and (b) to investigate ORC profiles which predicted the use of assessment instruments, therapy methods and collaborative activities in 2011 and 2013. Design and recruitment The evaluation study applied a naturalistic design with registration of outcome at consecutive assessments. The participants were contacted via official e-mail addresses in their respective healthcare units and were encouraged by their officials to participate on a voluntary basis. Statistics Descriptive statistics were obtained using SPSS version 23. A latent profile analysis (LPA) using Mplus 7.3 was performed with a robust maximum likelihood estimator (MLR) to identify subgroups (clusters) based on the 18 ORC indexes. Results A total of 2402 employees responded to the survey, of whom 1794 (74.7%) completed the ORC scores. Descriptive analysis indicated that the respondents were a homogenous group of employees, where women (72.0%) formed the majority. Cronbach's alpha for the 18 ORC indexes ranged from α = 0.67 to α = 0.78. A principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution explaining 62% of the variance in total ORC scores. The factors were: motivational readiness (α = 0.64), institutional resources (α = 0.52), staff attributes (α = 0.76), and organizational climate (α = 0.74). An LPA analysis of the four factors with their three distinct profiles provided the best data fit: Profile 3 (n = 614), Profile 2 (n = 934), and Profile 1 (n = 246). Respondents with the most favorable ORC scores (Profile 3) used significantly more instruments and more treatment methods and had a better collaborating network in 2011 as well as in 2013 compared to members in Profile 1, the least successful profile. Conclusion In a large sample of social work and healthcare professionals, ORC scores reflecting higher institutional resources, staff attributes and organizational climate and lower motivational readiness for change were associated with a successful implementation of good practice guidelines for the care and treatment of substance users in Sweden. Low motivational readiness as a construct may indicate satisfaction with the present situation. As ORC proved to be an indicator of successful dissemination of evidence-based guidelines into routine and specialist healthcare, it can be used to tailor interventions to individual employees or services and to improve the dissemination of and compliance with guidelines for the treatment of substance users. © 2017

  • 16.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Center for Collaborative Palliative Care , Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 17.
    Book, Robert T.
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Towards investigating athletic talent developmentenvironments in underserved communities in the United States2018In: The Science and Practice of Racket Sport for Improved Performance and Health: Special Focus on Table Tennis: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Urban Johnson, Lars Kristén, Miran Kondrič, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2018, p. 69-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This presentation will focus on the content of PhD project of the first author who has had extensive experiences of working in American schools within underserved (i.e., poor) communities. In spite of lacking resources, some of these schools are able to contribute into developing high performance athletes in various sports (including racket sports) and empowering them to achieve the success against the odds. These real life examples served as an inspiration to investigate such athletes’ career pathways and environments in which they had grown up.

    Aim and theoretical framework: The aim of this project is to acquire knowledge regarding the challenges and barriers faced by athletic talent development environments in underserved communities (UATDEs) and how successful UATDEs manage to help athletes achieve athletic and personal success against the odds. The study is based on the holistic ecological approach (Henriksen, 2010; Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017), and particularly on the athletic talent development environment (ATDE) model. The model was previously applied to study ATDEs in Scandinavia with its high social and economic equality. Conversely, in the United States, with its large income gap, many underserved communities struggle to produce elite athletes, and little investigation has been conducted surrounding such environments.

    Project design and method: The project will consist of three studies. Study 1will focus on exploring career pathways to athletic success and related environmental and personal factors in American athletes with low SES background through a series of interviews. Another series of interviews will be used in Study 2 to examine key stakeholders' perspectives on challenges faced and strategies implemented in UATDEs. In Study 3, the case study approach will be used to investigate two successful UATDEs within American communities and identify shared features responsible for their talent development success.

    Expected results: It is expected that Study 1 will reveal that athletes at the UATDEs were forced to deal with hardship and overcome a number of challenges that made them more resilient compared to those from affluent circumstances. From Study 2 it is expected to identify a spectrum of complicated issues (e.g., lack of funding, less access to practice time, lower moral, high stress and low levels of communication and support) that the UATDEs deal with. The anticipated results from Study 3 are that successful UATDEs have unique but also shared features that may form the basis for developing UATDE frameworks as an expansion of the holistic ecological approach.

  • 18.
    Clement, Damien
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United Kingdom.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Investigating the influence of intra-individual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1461-1466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that high levels of stress and stress responsivity can increase the risk of injuries. However, most of the research that has supported this notion has focused on between-person relationships, ignoring the relationships at the within-person level. As a result, the objective of this study was to investigate if within-person changes in perceived stress symptoms over a 1-month time period could predict injury rates during the subsequent 3 months. A prospective design with two measurement points (Time 1—at the beginning of the season and Time 2—1 month into the season) was utilized. A total of 121 competitive soccer players (85 males and 36 females; Mage = 18.39, SD = 3.08) from Sweden and the United States completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (KPDS) and a demographic sheet at Time 1. The KPDS was also completed at Time 2, and all acute injuries that occurred during the subsequent 3-month period were recorded. A Bayesian latent change scores model was used to determine whether within-person changes in stress symptoms could predict the risk of injury. Results revealed that there was a credible positive effect of changes in stress symptoms on injury rates, indicating that an increase in reported stress symptoms was related to an increased risk for injury. This finding highlights the importance of creating caring and supportive sporting environments and relationships and teaching stress management techniques, especially during the earlier portion of competitive seasons, to possibly reduce the occurrence of injuries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 19.
    Cruz, Jaume
    et al.
    Autonomous Univeristy of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Garcia-Mas, Alexandre
    Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma, Illes Balears, Spanien.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lucidi, Fabio
    University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Márquez, Sara
    University of León, León, Spain.
    Reyes, Santiago
    ONECO.
    Serpa, Sidonio
    University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Jaenes, Jose Carlos
    University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain.
    PsyTool design and theoretical background2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 212-212Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PsyTool is a European project, funded by Erasmus+ Sport Programme, led by the Universidad Pablo de Olavide (Sevilla, Spain). It brings together 13 partners from Spain, Portugal, Italy, United Kingdom and Sweden, running from January 2016 to December 2017. PsyTool is based theoretically on the concept of youth development through the practice of sport in positive and safe environments. The central idea is that this type of practice leads to a psychological wellbeing in all areas of personal development of athletes. Through sport programs that are free of bullying; zero permissiveness towards substance use; low acceptance of gamemanship and cheating, and at the same time promoters of fair play and clean competition, young athletes are more likely to increase their psychological well-being while they practice the sport to their best level of capacity. One of the most important assets of PsyTool is the formation of Agents of Change as inductors of this well-being promoter environment, according to their different responsibilities, from the politics to grassroot coaching. The AoCs’ selection, training and certification is one of the key points of this program. This so-called “targeted snowball” approach is expected to produce a spreading impact on the young athletes, which can be evaluated in the short and medium term, depending of the nature of the different AoCs. Coming form this design and theoretical background, this program –once the results have been analyzed- has to lead to a more ambitious development both in its scope and on the educational methods involved with.

  • 20.
    Defruyt, Simon
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    De Brandt, Koen
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Helping dual career athletes to recover from injury: a dual career support providers’ (DCSPs’) perspective2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The combination of elite sport and study, called a dual career (DC), can be challenging for athletes. DC Athletes can encounter co-occurring challenges at different domains of development (athletic, psychological, psychosocial, educational/vocational and financial) (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004). In this challenging period and environment, the burden of an injury is likely to be stressful for DC athletes. Although previous research have looked at how sports stakeholders can support the athletes within the athletic domain, no research up to our knowledge addressed how elite athletes can be supported holistically (i.e. in the different domains of development) outside of the club context. Therefore, current research aimed at gathering good practices of holistic support for DC athletes from a dual career support provider (DCSP) perspective.

    Methods

    Within the ‘Gold in education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) project, co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union, focus groups were conducted with a selection of DCSPs. As inclusion criterion for the participants, a DCSP was defined as: ‘a professional consultant, related to an educational institute and/or an elite sport organization – or certified by one of those – that provides support to elite athletes in view of optimizing their DC (combination of elite sport and education).’ One focus group in Sweden with six DCSPs and two focus groups in Belgium with two and three DCSPs were held. Using a phenomenological approach, participants were asked to share their methods used to holistically support DC athletes in coping with an injury.

    Results

    Five main themes of support emerged from the DCSPs discussions: a) practical support (e.g. support with transport problems if necessary), b) emotional support (e.g. empathic listening), c) reframing the injury in a holistic perspective (e.g. athletes will have more time for studies and family), d) empowerment of self-regulation competences (e.g. encourage the use of a recovery agenda), e) multidisciplinary and multi-organizations’ cooperation (e.g. structural meetings between different DC stakeholders).

    Conclusion

    Findings underscore the importance of a developmental and empowering approach in holistically supporting DC athletes to recover from an injury. Moreover, the cooperation between stakeholders in a DC support environment is crucial for an optimal recovery. Future research and practice could use current findings to develop injury recovery programs in a DC setting.

    References

    Wylleman P, Lavallee D. (2004). A Developmental Perspective on Transitions Faced by Athletes. In M Weis (Ed.), Developmental sport psychology. Morgantown, WV: Fitness International Technology.

  • 21.
    Diehl, Robert
    et al.
    Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Poczwardowski, Artur
    University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    O’Neil, Adam
    Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.
    Haberl, Peter
    United States Olympic Committee, Sport Performance Division, Colorado Spring, CO, USA.
    Transitioning to and thriving at the Olympic Training Center, Colorado Springs: Phases of an adaptive transition2019In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was focused on the process of an adaptive transition to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO (further – the OTC) and guided by the research question: What were the dynamic transition experiences of elite resident-athletes that constituted their successful transition to the OTC? A retreatment of Poczwardowski, Diehl, O’Neil, Cote, & Haberl’s (2014) semi-structured interviews with six accomplished resident-athletes was conducted through the lens of the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003) to propose a temporally based Transition to the OTC (further – the TOTC) empirical framework. The TOTC describes the successful transition as having four phases – preparation, assimilation, adaptation, and thriving – involving the dynamic interactions between the resident-athletes and the OTC programs/staff influencing the perceived transition challenges, barriers, resources, coping strategies, and outcomes throughout the four phases. Based on the TOTC, future research on the transitioning to residential training centers is outlined, and practical applications for the OTC staff, coaches, and sport psychologists (e.g., developmentally relevant intake protocols, strengths-based interventions, and orientation materials) are proposed.

  • 22.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    From career initiation to discontinuation: an empirical career model of Swedish handball players2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 190-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral project was inspired by a set of challenges articulated in the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013), and especially in regard of contextualizing career research and existing ‘general’ frameworks. Innovative aspects of this study consisted of: (a) exploring career experiences of Swedish handball players with foci on stages and transitions in their athletic and non-athletic development, and (b) consolidating the players’ first-hand data into an empirical career model of Swedish handball players (further – the empirical model). The holistic athletic career model (Wylleman, Reints & De Knop, 2013) served as a prototype for the empirical model and was useful in structuring the players’ career experiences. Eighteen elite Swedish handball players (retiring or just recently retired) took part in narrative type interviews about their whole careers with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially took a deductive turn to identify the handball career structure, and then the empirical data relevant to each stage/sub-stage were analysed inductively to identify themes describing players’ career experiences at each stage. Finally, the themes were incorporated into the stage-like structure, and the empirical model was completed. The model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation. It also contains eight layers – athletic categorisation in terms of age, pathways of the Swedish Handball Federation, academic/vocational, psychological, psychosocial, and financial developments – all aligned with age markers and complemented by sets of themes describing players’ stage-by-stage career experiences from the holistic perspective. Further in the project the empirical model will be used to create the ‘whole career’ psychological support system for Swedish handball players.

  • 23.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    No rest for the weary: Swedish elite handball players’ perceived demands in the transition to the national team2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 31-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Athletes have to pay a price to make their dream true, and for many this dream is to become professional and play in the national team (NT). Playing in the NT is often seen as the pinnacle of an athletic career but also as a period when athletes experience new demands due to their dual responsibility of playing in the club and in the NT. This dual responsibility brings additional performance demands, increased workload, extended travelling, many days away from home, etc., and in a combination with too little recovery, and various role conflicts leads to a stressful living. The transition to the NT can be classified as a quasi-normative (Stambulova, 2016) that is relevant only to elite level athletes. Challenging nature of this transition in a combination with its personal and social significance might put players at risk of poor coping and mental health problems (Frank, Nixdorf, & Beckmann, 2015; Stambulova & Wylleman, 2014; Stambulova 2017).

     Aim and theoretical framework: The transition to the NT was identified as a topic specific for the mastery stage of the players’ careers in the empirical career model of Swedish handball players (Ekengren, Stambulova, Johnson, & Carlsson, submitted). This model complemented by the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003; 2009) served as theoretical frameworks for this study. The aim of this study was to examine Swedish elite handball players’ experiences of participating in both a professional club and the NT with a specific focus on their perceived demands.

     Method: In the narrative-type interviews 18 Swedish elite handball players (9 men, 9 women) were encouraged to talk about their careers with foci on both athletic and non-athletic development (Ekengren et al., submitted). Narratives about their experiences of playing both in professional club and the NT were extracted from a larger data set and thematically analysed (Braun, Clarke & Terry 2015).

     Results: The national team was described as a great reward for their performance efforts and achievements, but also as a burden of being time and energy consuming:

     It’s a great honour to play in the national team, and you don’t want to turn it down. But I didn’t get the recovery I required to be able to play in both. So, I had to say “no”, because it tears greatly. It wasn’t right to my club that pays my salary. (Female player 7)

     Major themes outlining the players’ perceived demands in the NT transition were:

    • it wears and tears a lot physically and psychologically” (e.g., brings higher performance demands but also leaves small time for recovery);
    • you are caught in the treadmill of recurrent events (e.g., difficult to maintain good life quality being away from family)
    • you are torn between the two team” (e.g., conflicting interests in professional and national team)
    • “you are torn between different roles” (e.g., between being the NT player and a club player, a players and a family member)

     Discussion and conclusions: The project reveals how professional athletes appraised the increasing demands when selected to the NT. On the one hand, the NT transition was seen as a reward, but on the other hand, the transition demands put players under risk of too high life stress with possible negative consequences (e.g., injuries, burnout, and depression) to follow (e.g., Ivarsson, Stambulova, & Johnson, 2016; Stambulova, 2017). Based on the research findings recommendations will be provided for psychological support of NT-players and their coaches/managers in club and federation. This will include, for example, promoting a holistic view of the players’ situation, individual recovery plans and communication skills.

  • 24.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Returning home after playing abroad: re-adaptation challenges of elite Swedish handball players2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 531-531Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cultural sport psychology and athlete migration literature (Ryba, Schinke, Stambulova, & Elbe, 2017) there is a call for studying athletes’ transnational mobility and cultural transitions out of, and back to the country of origin. This call is also echoed in the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013) attracting attention of career researchers. This study is aimed at exploring “back home” re- adaptation challenges of elite Swedish handball players after several years of playing professionally abroad. Eleven players (six females) were interviewed about their careers from the beginning to the end, and their narratives about the transition back to Sweden were extracted from the larger data set and thematically analysed (Braun & Clarke, 2013). Participants spent abroad for M=7.2±2.8 years, and many of them came back having families and kids. Several informants narrated that the transition was more challenging than they expected, and they (especially at the beginning) felt themselves as strangers in their own land. Five major themes describing the transition challenges were: “to rethink self-identity”, “to renew family life”, “to re- establish links with relatives and family”, “to understand local laws and regulations”, “to keep in pace with the society”. The identity issue was addressed through a sense of being “in between” the identities of the home and the foreign cultures that elevated emotional discomfort, especially at the early phase of re-adjustment. Three themes describing coping strategies used in the re-adaptation were: “don’t give up” (i.e., attempt to change own attitude and the situation to the better), “use social skills” (e.g., be alert and communicate) and “search for social support” (e.g., from a spouse and close family). Based on the findings, recommendations will be provided for pre-retirement planning of elite athletes and psychological support in their cultural transition and re-adaptation back home.

  • 25.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Svenska handbollsspelares karriär: En empirisk modell och ett psykologiskt stödsystem2015In: Program Svebi 2015, 2015, p. 25-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Handboll har en lång tradition inom svensk idrottsrörelse och tillhör de mest populära lagidrotterna. I Sverige finns 110 000 utövare, lika många män och kvinnor, som är aktiva i landets 400 föreningar. Internationella Handbollförbundet har 190 medlemsländer och Sverige är en ledande nation inom världshandbollen med 21 medaljer i OS, VM och EM. Att satsa på en karriär som elitspelare i handboll är attraktivt. I Sverige finns ett Riksidrottsgymnasium och 38 Nationellt godkända idrottsutbildningar som kvalitetssäkras av Svenska Handbollförbundet (SHF). Det innebär att drygt 400 spelare årligen tar examen från ett elithandbollsgymnasium. Trots handbollens utbredning och popularitet finns lite kunskap om handbollskarriären, utifrån övergångar och utmaningar som aktiva ställs inför. Kunskapen är av vikt för aktiva liksom tränare, föräldrar och stödpersoner t.ex. idrottspsykologiska rådgivare. Forskningen är relevant för föreningar, förbund, gymnasier och SHF:s spelarutbildning, landslagsverksamhet och tränarutbildning. Ökad kunskap medför att fler fullföljer och optimerar sin karriär, samt stannar kvar och är välmående en längre period. Dagens idrottsforskning inom karriärområdet och aktuell studie belyser betydelsen av förklaringsmodeller som ser karriären från ett idrottsspecifikt och holistiskt kontext. Forskning som dels fångar den verksamma kulturen, dels studerar den livslånga processen och hela karriären, tillskillnad från enstaka moment.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram

    Syftet i delstudie 1 är att utifrån intervjuer med etablerade svenska landslagsspelare i handboll studera handbollskarriären och utveckla en Empirisk karriärmodell (EKM) för svenska handbollsspelare. Modellen valideras i tre separata fokusgrupper, bestående av tränare, herr- och damspelare. Syftet i delstudie 2 är att utveckla och validera ett Psykologiskt stödsystem (PSS) för svenska elithandbollsspelare. Utifrån EKM och doktorandens gedigna erfarenhet av tillämpat arbete med svenska elit- och landslagsspelare skapas ett stödsystem, som validering i fyra fokusgrupper; tränare, herr-, damspelare och idrottspsykologiska rådgivare. Utifrån diskussioner och slutsatser sammanställs PSS. Det teoretiska ramverket består av: Cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2014), Holistic athletic career model (Wylleman, Reints & De Knop, 2013) och Athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003).

    Metod

    Studiens urval är strategiskt och baseras på att informanterna ska ha spelat minst 20 tävlingslandskamper på seniornivå för Sverige, de ska ha varit professionella idrottare på internationell klubbnivå i minst fem år och vara i slutet av sin karriär, alternativt ha avslutat sin idrottsliga karriär. Om idrottskarriären är avslutad ska avskedet skett inom de närmsta tre åren. Under 2015 har pilotintervju och 18 stycken narrativa intervjuer genomförts. Studien har en jämn fördelning mellan kvinnor och män. De kvinnliga informanternas ålder är mellan 28 och 34 år (M = 30,6, SD = 2,2), de manliga informanternas ålder är mellan 27 och 38 år (M = 34,4, SD = 3,1). I snitt har kvinnorna spelat 83 landskamper (SD = 36,5), männen har i snitt spelat 123 landskamper (SD = 57,3).

    Resultat och diskussion

    Analys av intervjuer pågår således är studiens resultat och diskussion under arbete. Reflektion från aktuell process är att idrottskarriären är av central betydelse och anges som det område som alltid har prioriterats högst i informanternas liv. Det finnas en tendens i att kvinnor ställs inför en komplexare tillvaro eftersom de väljer att ha uppmärksamhet på parallella områden i livet, som de därmed får hantera. Den ekonomiska verkligheten är av naturliga skäl tuffare för kvinnorna, eftersom ersättningar är markant lägre. Det är också en faktor som skapar ökad fokus på andra områden i livet, främst utbildning. Förståelsen kring det som krävs på internationell nivå, utmaningar som väntar och färdigheter som gynnar, verkar vara relativt låg innan de aktiva i studien de facto hamnar på aktuell nivå. Flera val är medvetna samtidigt som informanterna reflekterar kring att tillfälligheter och tur är återkommande faktorer i deras karriär.

  • 26.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study was aimed at developing the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players by means of exploring their career experiences in athletic and non-athletic developments through the lens of the holistic athletic career model. Eighteen Swedish professional handball players (nine men and nine women), who had recently terminated or were finishing their careers took part in semi-structured interviews about their careers from the beginning to the end with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially focused on identifying the handball career structure (i.e. stages and sub-stages). Then, the interviews were analysed inductively to identify shared themes in the players’ experiences relevant to each career stage. These themes were incorporated in the relevant stages, and the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players (further – the empirical model) was finalised. The empirical model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four athletic stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation – complemented by players’ psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, and financial developments. Each stage is also aligned with age markers and contains themes describing players’ career experiences from the holistic perspective. The empirical model contributes to contextualised career research and serves as a basis for developing career-long psychological support services in Swedish handball including player/coach/parent education organised by the Swedish Handball Federation.

  • 27.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ryba, Tatania
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Composite vignettes of Swedish male and female professional handball players’ career paths2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe gender-specific career paths of Swedish professional handball players. A reanalysis of Ekengren et al. (2018) career interviews with nine male and nine female players led to creating two composite vignettes using the athletes’ own words, accounted for typical features in the male and female players’ career paths. Seven themes were identified in the analysis of the men’s transcripts and eight themes derived from the women’s transcripts. Further, the themes of both vignettes were aligned with career stages described in our previous study (Ekengren et al. 2018). The male players’ vignette is interpreted as a performance narrative congruent with elite handball culture that promotes performance success and profitable professional contracts. The female players’ vignette is more holistic, embracing handball, studies, motherhood, and how they ought to be as Swedish women. Recommendations for future research are provided. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 28.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Moving to Play Abroad: Experiences of Transnational Team Handball Players2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many athletes strive to excel in their sport, dreaming of fame and fortune, aiming for a career as a professional athlete. In the Nordic countries, becoming professional often implies a migration across national borders. In this relocation, it is not only crucial for transnational athletes to adapt in sport, a cultural and psychological adaptation is also needed (Ryba, Haapanen, Mosek, & Ng, 2012; Agergaard & Ryba, 2014). The purpose of this study was to examine team handball players’ experiences of their first transition and adaptation to a professional league in a foreign country, with a specific focus on their perceived demands and coping strategies. Participants were 18 senior elite team handball players (10 male, 8 female). During narrative-type interviews participants were encouraged to tell their story, focusing on how they experienced their first transnational transition. Participants’ narratives were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2013), themes and patterns of meaning were identified. The four major themes of perceived transition demands were: ‘Learn new cultural and social codes’, ‘Adjust to the rules of the new club’, ‘Accept the result focused environment’, ‘Acknowledge your role and play it’. Three themes of coping strategies were: ‘Embrace the challenge’ (e.g., be aware of the new context, negotiate and adapt to new norms and expect the unexpected) ‘Embrace yourself’ (e.g., to care for and prioritize yourself in a self-centered, but still positive way) and ‘Embrace your demons’ (e.g., accept feelings of doubt and anxiety and carry on regardless of them). Based on the research findings recommendations will be provided for psychological support of transnational athletes in their transition and adaptation abroad.

  • 29.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Bertollo, Maurizio
    “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy & University of Suffolk, Ipswich, United Kingdom.
    Debois, Nadine
    National Institute of Sport, Expertise and Performance (INSEP), Paris, France.
    de Oliveira, Rita F.
    London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom.
    Fritsch, Julian
    Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Moesch, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raab, Markus
    London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom & German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Vaisetaite, Lina
    National Olympic Committee of Lithuania, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Preface to the special issue: 50 years of FEPSAC2019In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 42, p. 5-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Morela, Eleftheria
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Ries, Francis
    University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
    Kouli, Olga
    Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Acculturation through sport: Different contexts different meanings2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 178-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the role of sport as a social integrative agent for migrants has provided equivocal results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between ethnic–cultural identity and sport environmental factors. Young migrant male athletes from two different societal and sport contexts were studied: migrants from Eastern European countries living in Greece (n=60) and from Latin America living in Spain (n=60). Participants completed measures of ethnic and cultural identity, task-oriented motivational climate, and autonomy- supportive coaching behaviour. Analysis of variance revealed that Eastern European inhabitants of Greece scored higher on fringe and assimilation, and lower on lack of interaction compared to Latin American inhabitants of Spain. In addition, for the former group, a mastery motivational climate and autonomy-supportive coaching predicted an integrative identity, whereas for the latter group, the motivational environment did not predict acculturation patterns. The results suggest that sport may serve different acculturation purposes, thus explaining to a degree the lack of consistent results regarding the integrative role of sport. The study provides preliminary support for the importance of the sport motivational environment for the facilitation of integration. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 31.
    Fernández, M. L.
    et al.
    Centro de Estudios Universitarios San Isidoro, Centro Adscrito A la Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain.
    Pérez, R. C.
    Centro de Estudios Universitarios San Isidoro, Centro Adscrito A la Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain.
    Jiménez, A. M. L.
    Universidad de Sevilla, Spain.
    Hertting, Krister
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    "Entrenando a familias". Evaluación de un programa de optimización de actitudes parentales en un club de fútbol2018In: Revista de Psicologia del Deporte, ISSN 1132-239X, E-ISSN 1988-5636, Vol. 27, no Supplement 3, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Fogaca, J. L.
    et al.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Zizzi, S. J.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Walking multiple paths of supervision in American sport psychology: A qualitative tale of novice supervisees’ development2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 156-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited evidence for what characteristics of supervision delivery facilitate novice supervisees' development. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between supervision-delivery approaches and the perceptions of service-delivery competence development in novice practitioners. The authors interviewed 9 supervisor-supervisee dyads before and after the academic term in which the supervisees had their first applied experiences. Supervisees also completed reflective journal entries regarding their supervisory experiences and development. Data analysis included constant comparative analysis and triangulation of qualitative results with a practitioner-skills inventory. Different approaches to supervision delivery seemed to contribute similarly to novice supervisees' development. Supervisees developed in more areas when the dyads had consistent meetings, close supervisory relationships, feedback, and frequent opportunities for self-reflection and when supervisors adapted the delivery to the supervisees' developmental levels. In addition, factors in supervisees' background, practice, and supervision that contributed to perceptions of service-delivery competence are discussed. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 33.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Athletic and Student Identities of Swedish Adolescent Student-Athletes: Mixed-Method Exploration2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 153-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the project was to explore Swedish adolescent student-athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS) based on the holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and career transition framework (Stambulova, 2003). Transitional variables (e.g., demands, coping strategies, personal and environmental resources,) covering student athletes’ sport, studies, and private life were studied in line with their athletic and student identities. This presentation will particularly focus on how student-athletes’ dual career experiences affect their athletic and student identities during their first year at NESS. Participants (main sample) were first year student-athletes of 15-16 years old representing different sports and 33 NESS across the country. A longitudinal mixed-method research design was implemented with the first quantitative measurement conducted in autumn (n = 261), and the second measurement in spring (n = 250). Athletic and student identities were measured using the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS; Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993) and the Student Identity Measurement Scale (SIMS; Engström & Stambulova, 2010). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants from the main sample two times during the year (autumn and spring). Interview guides were structured in three parts exploring student athletes’ near past (e.g., previous experiences of combining sport, studies and private life or the dual career experiences between the two interviews), present status in the transition (e.g., demands, coping strategies, perception of themselves as students and athletes), and future expectations. The results of both quantitative and qualitative exploration of the student-athletes’ identity issue can be summarized as follows: (1) no significant changes were found in athletic and student identities between the two quantitative measurements, however, athletic identity was significantly higher than student identity in both measurements, (2) interviews confirmed that student-athletes perceived themselves to have higher athletic than student identity but also that inter-individual variations in their perceptions existed, (3) there were intra-individual differences in how student-athletes perceived their self-identities between the first and the second interview, (4) there was a clear message from the interviews that searching for an optimal balance between student and athlete roles and also between athletic and student identities was perceived as a key issue in adjusting to the dual career at NESS. The participants’ narratives will be used to illustrate the complexity of student-athletes’ perception of their athletic and student identities.

  • 34.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    A Swedish female basketball player’s junior-to-seniortransition: A narrative case study2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 32-33Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Social influences on the junior-to-senior transition in Swedish athletes: narrative case studies2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 124-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level. The JST: (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts between one and four years, and (c) is characterized by athletes’ high dropout rate (Bruner, Munroe-Chandler, & Spink, 2008; Franck, Stambulova, & Weibull, 2016; Stambulova, 2009). This study is a follow up of the quantitative longitudinal study of the JST in Swedish club-based athletes (Franck et al., 2016; Franck, Stambulova, & Ivarsson, in press) and aimed at further qualitative exploration of the JST process emphasizing social influences involved. Four athletes (age M = 24.2, SD = 1.5) representing tennis, swimming, football, and basketball were interviewed. They were encouraged to reflect retrospectively on their JST process using five measurement points of the longitudinal study as an aid to structure their narratives. The interviews lasted for about 90 minutes. Thematic narrative analysis (Smith, 2016) was used to identify themes related to social influences during the JST and their perceived facilitative or debilitative effects. All four JST narratives were unique, however, to structure the results the narratives were pared to represent individual vs. team sport contexts. The results revealed that the social factors facilitating the JST were shared by both sport contexts and included family support, and good relationships with coaches and peers. The debilitating social factors that worked as the JST barriers were more diverse across the sport contexts. These factors covered a lack of sponsors/financial support and the ambiguity of requirements from the sport federations in individual sports, and changes in the structure of the team and selection to a higher level team not being ready for, in team sports. All participants went through the JST, continued a few years after, and then terminated their athletic careers.

  • 36.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The junior to senior transition: A narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes2019In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 284-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are as many careers with various pathways as there are athletes, and the interest in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) stems from its particular importance for athletes’ lives when aiming for the senior elite levels of their sports (Stambulova 1994, 2009). This study is a follow-up of the quantitative longitudinal study that investigated the JST process in Swedish sport club athletes (Franck et al. 2016a, 2016b). The aim of this study was to explore two athletes’ (pseudonyms Erik, the swimmer, and Jessika, the tennis player) JST transition pathways, emphasising psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the transition process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the stories were analysed using the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith 2016). The analysis provided a central storyline (performance narrative) that is similar for both athletes, and two side storylines: Erik’s effort and relationship narrative and Jessika’s injury and reorientation narrative. They shared psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating the transition process, including family, coaches and sport club environment. For Erik, the debilitating factors were the negative changes in the group and a poor relationship with the new coach. The debilitating factors that influenced Jessika’s JST were the decrease/loss of financial support and the challenge of facing younger opponents against whom she felt she shouldn’t lose when making a comeback after an injury. After the JST, both Erik and Jessika changed their tracks in life, terminated their athletic careers and focused on pursuing higher education qualifications.

  • 37.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The junior to senior transition: a narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes2019In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 284-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are as many careers with various pathways as there are athletes, and the interest in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) stems from its particular importance for athletes’ lives when aiming for the senior elite levels of their sports (Stambulova 1994, 2009). This study is a follow-up of the quantitative longitudinal study that investigated the JST process in Swedish sport club athletes (Authors et al. 2016a, 2016b). The aim of this study was to explore two athletes’ (pseudonyms Erik, the swimmer, and Jessika, the tennis player) JST transition pathways, emphasising psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the transition process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the stories were analysed using the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith 2016). The analysis provided a central storyline (performance narrative) that is similar for both athletes, and two side storylines: Erik’s effort and relationship narrative and Jessika’s injury and reorientation narrative. They shared psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating the transition process, including family, coaches and sport club environment. For Erik, the debilitating factors were the negative changes in the group and a poor relationship with the new coach. The debilitating factors that influenced Jessika’s JST were the decrease/loss of financial support and the challenge of facing younger opponents against whom she felt she shouldn’t lose when making a comeback after an injury. After the JST, both Erik and Jessika changed their tracks in life, terminated their athletic careers and focused on pursuing higher education qualifications. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 38.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 398-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to identify adjustment patterns in the JST based on athletes’ dynamics of adjustment during a two-and-a–half-year period, and (b) to describe the athletes’ demographic, personal and transitional characteristics at the beginning of the JST that were related to the different adjustment patterns. This quantitative longitudinal study consisted of five measurements conducted approximately every six months over a two-and-a-half-year period. One instrument was used to measure the transition variables and three instruments to measure personal characteristics. In the first measurement, 101 club-based Swedish athletes with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) took part. The latent profile analysis (LPA) on athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment provided three profiles with different patterns in the JST. Profile 1 had a progressive adjustment pattern, whereas the second profile had a regressive adjustment pattern, and the third profile had a sustainable adjustment pattern. The descriptive statistics and Cohen’s d indicated that there were differences (with variation in magnitude) between the three profiles at the first measurement in terms of how athletes perceived different transitional characteristics. Keeping a primary focus on sport (but also having attention to other spheres of life), high athletic identity and motivation to reach senior level were characteristics relevant for both progressive and sustainable adjustment patterns. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 39.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Weibull, Fredrik
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Profiles of personal characteristics and relevant pathways in the junior-to-senior transition: A longitudinal study of Swedish athletes2016In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 483-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the specific foci were as follows: (1) to identify profiles of athletes in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) based on their personal characteristics (athletic identity, self-esteem and goal orientation) and (2) to describe the JST pathways relevant to the profiles. This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted approximately every six months. The following package of four instruments was used: the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), the self-esteem sub-scale from the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007) and the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012). In the first measurement 100 club-based Swedish athletes (73 male and 27 female) with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) participated. The Latent Profile Analysis identified three profiles of athletes and several similarities and differences can be seen in the profiles of athletes’ transition pathways. The main findings are: (1) three profiles of personal characteristics associated with different JST transition pathways were identified; (2) athletic identity appeared to be key personal characteristic that influenced the dynamic of adjustment and (3) different styles of coping strategies were associated with different JST pathways. The JST pathways relevant to the profiles are discussed based on the theoretical framework and previous research.

  • 40.
    Galanis, Evangelos
    et al.
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Comoutos, Nikos
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Charachousi, Fedra
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    From the lab to the field: Effects of self-talk on task performance under distracting conditions2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the effectiveness of self-talk strategies on task performance under conditions of external distraction in laboratory and field experiments. In the laboratory experiment, 28 sport science students (Mage 21.48±1.58 years) were tested on a computer game requiring attention and fine execution following a baseline assessment and a short self-talk training. In the field experiment, 28 female basketball players (Mage 20.96±4.51 years) were tested on free-throwing, following a baseline assessment and a six-week intervention. In both settings the final assessment took place under conditions of external distraction (noncontinuous, sudden, loud noise). Analyses of covariance showed that participants of the self-talk group performed better than participants of the control group. Findings suggest that self-talk can counter the effects of distraction on performance, and indicate that the attentional effects of self-talk is a viable mechanism to explain the facilitating effects of self-talk on performance. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 41.
    Garell, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa - insatser till ensamkommande ungdomar samt personal vid EKB-hem och ungdomsmottagningar: En utvärdering på uppdrag av Region Halland2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten är slutrapporten för utvärderingen av projektet ”Sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa – insatser till ensamkommande ungdomar samt personal vid EKB-hem och ungdomsmottagningar” under året 2018.Intervjuer har genomförts med personer som på olika sätt är involverade i projektet; kurator gymnasieskola, integrationssamordnare Länsstyrelsen, socialpedagog kommun, hälso- och sjukvårdstrateg regionen, kuratorer ungdomsmottagning, barnmorskor ungdomsmottagning, projektledare samt deltagande ungdom. Information via epost har inhämtats från verksamhetsledare för en enhet för ensamkommande barn. Utvärderingen har gjorts utifrån en pedagogisk förklarings- och handlingsinriktad utvärderingsmodell där utfallet sedan värderats mot ett teoretiskt perspektiv; ett sociokulturellt perspektiv på lärande samt med hjälp av begreppen empowerment och health literacy. Den genomgående bild som framträtt är att projektet är uppskattat och viktigt. Projektledaren har fått mycket beröm för sin kunskap och kompetens inom området och för sitt sätt att möta ungdomarna. Personalen vid ungdomsmottagningen menar att de inspirerats av projektledaren och har lärt sig ett nytt pedagogiskt förhållningssätt för att möta dessa ungdomar. En annan, lika genomgående bild, är att kommunikationen i projektet har varit dålig med flera oklarheter och dubbla budskap. Det har varit ostrukturerat. Det har varit svårigheter i samarbetet med skolorna och en osäkerhet i om ungdomarna kommer att dyka upp på informationsträffarna eller inte. Tolkningen har också stundtals varit problematisk. Projektledaren och projektet har varit flexibla och kunnat anpassa sig efter ändrade förutsättningar och behov. Bedömningen är att projektet har nått sina mål om ökad kunskap både för ensamkommande ungdomar och för personal på ungdomsmottagningar.

  • 42. Gibbs, Petah
    et al.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Marchant, Daryl B.
    Institute of Sport, Exercise, and Active Living Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The Athlete Apperception Technique: Manual and Materials for Sport and Clinical Psychologists2017Book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gibbs, Petah M.
    et al.
    Private Practice, Melbourne, Australia.
    Marchant, Daryl B.
    Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Development of a clinical sport projective assessment method: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT)2017In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of applied sport psychology, there is an increasing appreciation for diversity of training models, research methodologies, and therapeutic approaches. For example, psychodynamic formulations and interpretations have begun to appear more frequently in the sport psychology literature. In keeping with emerging psychodynamic viewpoints, we believe the time is right to introduce a qualitative sport-specific projective instrument: the Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT). The AAT represents a new technique based on psychodynamic theory and established projective test construction principles. It was designed primarily as a clinical tool for practitioners and not as an instrument for quantitative research into personality. It does, however, have potential research applications, especially in clinical sport case study research and narrative analysis investigations. The AAT produces an idiographic understanding of athletes’ characteristics, anxieties, and motivations (both conscious and unconscious). We briefly review the literature on the development of projective techniques, explain the rationale underlying the development of the AAT, and present three sequential studies to explain the AAT image selection procedures that led to the final product. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 44.
    Gullberg, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and sports.
    Stressresponsens påverkan på prestation samt copingstrategiers påverkan innan och underprestation2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 45.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Storm, Louise Kamuk
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Pyrdol, Nicklas
    Team Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten Hvid
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Successful and Less Successful Interventions with Youth and Senior Athletes: Insights from Expert Sport Psychology Practitioners2019In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 72-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on reflections of expert sport psychology practitioners about their interventions with competitive youth and senior elite athletes. Two objectives include: (1) to identify key structural components used by practitioners to describe sport psychology interventions and integrate them into an empirical framework, and (2) to analyze the practitioners’ experiences in regard of their successful and less successful interventions in competitive youth and elite senior sport contexts using the empirical framework. We conducted semi-structured interviews with twelve internationally recognized sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) and analyzed the data thematically. The empirical framework derived from the SPPs’ accounts contains eight structural components integrated into two categories: (1) the content and focus (with three components, e.g., adaptation of content), and (2) the organization and delivery of interventions (with five components, e.g., initiation and assessment of athletes’ needs). Using the empirical framework we found differences between successful and less successful interventions and between youth and senior contexts in terms of needs assessment, adaptation and breadth of content, athlete-practitioner relationship, and intervention settings. The empirical framework might inform SPPs in their efforts to design, implement, and evaluate their services in these two contexts.

  • 46.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Storm, Louise
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Creating optimal environments for talent development2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 242-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holistic ecological approach (HEA) to talent development in sport shifts researchers’ attention from the individual athletes to the broader environment in which they develop. The HEA provides a theoretical grounding, ecologically inferred definitions of talent development, two working models, and methodological guidelines. The HEA highlights two interconnected ways of analyzing athletic talent development environments (ATDE). First, there is a focus on the structure of the environment, particularly the roles and cooperation of key persons. Second, there is a focus on the organizational culture of the team. A number of in-depth case studies of successful talent development environments in Scandinavia have shown that while each environment is unique, they also share a number of features. They are characterized by proximal role modeling; an integration of efforts among the different agents (family, coaches, management etc.); inclusive training groups rather than early selection; a focus on long-term developmental rather than on early success, and a “strong and coherent” organizational culture. Moving from ecological research to ecologically informed practice, we add applied principles and provide an example of how these principles were used in developing a culture for goal directedness in a group of under-17 players in a football academy in Denmark. The case example demonstrates two main ideas: (1) a team’s organizational culture influences the athletes, or in popular terms the characteristics of culture become the character of the athletes; and (2) the coach plays a vital part in creating and maintaining a team culture. Together, the eight common features of successful ATDEs, the case examples, and the applied HEA principles can serve as a guide for practitioners aiming to improve talent development environments in sport.

  • 47.
    Hertting, Krister
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    "More Practice-based Courses and Not Just a Load of Papers to Read": Youth Soccer Coaches Reflections on Coach Education Programs in Sweden2019In: Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, ISSN 2081-2221, E-ISSN 1899-4849, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the formal soccer coach education programs are divided into different levels and are also divided into youth coaching and senior coaching. This paper focuses on youth soccer coaches and their reflections on coach education programs. In the background section the Swedish context is described, as well as current research on coaches’ education and learning. The aim of the paper was to investigate youth soccer coaches’ reflections on coach education programs and to analyse their reflections by using a cultural approach to learning. The empirical material of the paper derives from a web-based questionnaire, posing questions about competence, learning and stress. The coaches were also invited to reflect on the question “how do you believe that soccer associations can educate good coaches?” There were 369 responses, and these were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results indicated reflections about Flexibility in time, place and content, Mentorship supporting informal learning, Demanding mandatory education and emolument, Education focusing on wholeness and Education being based in practice. The conclusion was that decentralization of education and development of coaches’ contexts, abilities and motivation to critically analyse aims and contents of coach education programs are improvement areas for learning and coaching practices.

  • 48.
    Hertting, Krister
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Holmquist, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Karlsson, Michaela
    Halmstad University.
    Sandéhn, Alexandra
    Halmstad University.
    Ping pong health!: A table tennis intervention for improved health at the workplace2018In: The Science and Practice of Racket Sport for Improved Performance and Health: Special Focus on Table Tennis: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Urban Johnson, Lars Kristén, Miran Kondrič, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2018, p. 22-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity has a positive impact on physical and psychological well-being (Delisle, Werch, Wong, Bian, & Weiler, 2010), as well as social relations and skills development (Lamu & Olsen, 2016; Perkins & Williamon, 2014). Adopting a “healthy organization” culture through health programs, with strong senior and middle management support, and using interventions can promote health at workplaces (Rajaratnam et. al., 2014). We, therefore, consider it relevant to have physical activity, social relations and skill development as the starting point in a tabletennis intervention at the workplace.

    Aim: The aim was to develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention for improving health and wellbeing in the workplace by introducing table tennis.

    Methods and results: The intervention design consisted of two workshops and five table tennis sessions. Thirteen employees from a warehouse within the retail sector participated in the intervention. The participants had various backgrounds in table tennis and sport in general, different motives to participate, and came from different groups of employees (management and stock). After an introductory workshop, two table tennis coaches held one training session a week over the fiveweek intervention period. The employees were divided in to two groups and each group had a 45-minute session. The evaluation is in progress at present. Pre- and post-measurement has been conducted using health questionnaires Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). These will be analysed using a Bayesian paired t-test analysis. Based on the results of the questionnaire focus group interviews will be conducted with participants. Three focus groups of 4-5 participants in each group. The questions will focus on 24 experiences of the intervention and reflections on future directions for table-tennis and wellbeing activities at the workplace. Finally, there will be a workshop pointing out future directions for sport-based health activities at the workplace.

  • 49.
    Hofseth, Erik
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Toering, Tynke
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Jordet, Geir
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH), Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Self-evaluation of skills and performance level in youth elite soccer: Are positive self-evaluations always positive?2017In: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, ISSN 2157-3905, E-ISSN 2157-3913, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 370-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared youth elite soccer players’ and their coaches’ evaluations of players’ skill level, and examined how this comparison was related to players' future performance level concerning national team experience. Based on the notions of the self-serving bias, it was predicted that players who overestimated their skill level relative to their coaches’ judgment, would be characterized by a high performance level in the past and a relative low future performance level; due to relatively high levels of performance anxiety and a frequent use of self-protection strategies. Results showed that the players (N= 267, Mage = 17.6, SD = 1.1), in reference to their coach, tended to overestimate their skills. This tendency was negatively related to players’ future performance level. Specifically, when controlling for age, past performance level and current performance level, a multinomial regression analysis (X² 18, N = 238) = 76.95, p ˂ .01) revealed that the players who overestimated their skills to the largest extent (compared to players that underestimated their skills), were less likely to produce a high performance level in the future (OR = .71, 95% CI = .54 - 18 .94). It seems that unrealistically positive self-evaluations can have negative effects in terms of performance development, but not through the mechanism of the self-serving bias, as measured in the current study. Nevertheless, it may be important for players to have a realistic view on their skill-level in order to progress and reach their potential. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  • 50.
    Håman, Linn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prell, Hillevi
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    “If it’s not Iron it’s Iron f*cking biggest Ironman”: personal trainers’s views on health norms, orthorexia and deviant behaviours2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 2, article id 1364602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthorexia nervosa (ON) describes a pathological obsession with healthy eating to avoid ill health. In the Swedish context, ON is also understood in terms of unhealthy exercise. Fitness gyms are popular health-promoting places, but exercise-related problems, disordered eating and ON-like behaviour are increasing. Personal trainers (PTs) play an important role in detecting unhealthy behaviours. The aim of the present study was to illuminate PTs’ understandings of healthy and unhealthy exercise and eating behaviours in relation to orthorexia nervosa in a fitness gym context. Five focus groups with 14 PTs were conducted. These were analysed using interpretative qualitative content analysis and Becker’s model “Kinds of Deviance.” In contrast to PTs’ health norms (practicing balanced behaviours and contributing to well-being), ON was expressed mainly in terms of exercise behaviour and as being excessive and in total control. The PTs maintain that extreme behaviours are legitimized by an aggressive exercise trend in society and that they fear to falsely accuse clients of being pathological. Certain sport contexts (bodybuilding, fitness competitions and elite sports) and specific groups (fitness professionals) contribute to complicating PTs’ negotiations due to a competition, performance and/or profession norm, making it difficult to determine whether or not to intervene. © 2017 The Author(s)

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