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  • 1.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Sport psychology in Europe – Women’s perspective2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, 55-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to other disciplines of psychology, sport and exercise psychology is a very young field. Sport psychology associations were founded in a variety of countries (particularly in Europe and North America) in the 1960es and later, after the first World Congress of Sport Psychology had taken place in Rome in 1965. Despite the fact that even in those ages quite a few women were studying psychology and afterwards starting a scientific career, females in sport psychology were extremely underrepresented. One of the reasons could lie in the fact that sport, much more than psychology, was a stereotypically male field, with only a few opportunities available to women. Making a career in sport psychology was then a double contradiction for women. First, making a career in general contradicted the typical female role, and second, making a career in sport meant an untypical field for women.

    The presentation will be structured as a dialogue between the two presenters – female sport psychologists working in the field for more than 30 years. Both were born and started their careers during the period of the Cold War: Dorothee Alfermann in the Federal Republic of Germany, and Natalia Stambulova in the Soviet Union. Both countries do not exist on the European map any more reflecting dramatic political, social and economic changes in Europe during the last two decades. All the changes in the European context put their impacts on the development of sport and exercise psychology in Europe including overall organizational development, as well as female careers and their contributions to European Federation of Sport Psychology (FEPSAC), other international sport psychology organizations (e.g., ISSP, AASP) and international sport psychology events (e.g., Congresses). The dialogue will be structured around the following three themes: (a) the presenters’ own careers analyzed from the point of gender issues (e.g., female professional role models and mentors), (b) history of European sport and exercise psychology, foundation of FEPSAC and contribution of its first President Ema Geron (1969-1973), and (c) female sport psychology professionals’ role in today’s European sport psychology and their contributions to FEPSAC, ISSP, AASP, national sport psychology associations, the editorial board of Psychology of Sport and Exercise, the European Forum of Applied Sport Psychologists, the European Master’s Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMSSEP), and the recent European Master’s (Mundus) Program in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMPSEP).

  • 2.
    Alvarsson, Evelina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lorentzson, Moa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Mobbning på arbetsplatsen: En litteraturstudie om mobbningens konsekvenser ur ett folkhälsoperspektiv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Eftersom det inte finns någon riktig benämning på vad vuxenmobbning innefattar är detta område inte särskilt belyst. Det som på senare år tagits fram är att mobbing som förekommer på arbetsplatsen är orsaken till många sjukskrivningar. 

    Syftet: Syftet med studien var att beskriva hälsokonsekvenserna av mobbning på arbetsplatsen.     

    Metod: Studien genomfördes som en litteraturstudie där 15 vetenskapliga artiklar utgjorde grunden. Artiklarna granskades och därefter skapades två teman. 

    Resultat: De psykiska hälsoeffekterna av mobbning kan vara kort- och långsiktiga. De psykiska hälsoproblemen som ångest och depression kan övergå till fysiska åkommor så som sömnproblem, muskelsmärta och infektioner. 

    Implikation: Kunskap om mobbning kan användas till att utveckla trygga arbetsmiljöer för att motverka mobbning. 

  • 3.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    A methodology of loving kindness: how interpersonal neurobiology, compassion, and transference can inform researcher–participant encounters and storytelling2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 1, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns some central aspects of methodology in qualitative research: the participants’ and investigators’ storytelling, and the main instruments in many interview-based qualitative studies, the researchers themselves. We discuss several ethical and interpersonal aspects of qualitative research encounters between investigators and their interviewee participants. Interviewing research participants is a fundamentally exploitative process, and we make suggestions for how we can temper that exploitation by giving something of value back to our participants and to make sure the well-being of the participant is not compromised by our actions. Many research topics in qualitative studies concern experiences of stress, distress and trauma, and interviewees re-telling their stories may become retraumatised. Such retraumatisation constitutes abuse on the part of the researcher. To counter potential abuse and exploitation, we discuss how researchers, as the central instruments in interview-based investigations, can use knowledge of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic theory and mindful practice to enable them to hold their participants (and their participants’ stories) in loving care and maybe even help in healing processes. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 4.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stages and demands in the careers of Canadian National Hockey League players2015In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 34, no 3, 278-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have identified some demands of Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players, yet there is little direction for players hoping to reach the lucrative league. The objectives of this study were to identify the stages, statuses and demands in Canadian NHL players’ careers and propose an empirical career model of Canadian NHL players. In total, 5 rookies, 5 veterans and 13 retirees had their interviews undergo an interpretive thematic analysis. Prospects face the NHL combine, training camp and minor league assignment. While developing into NHL players, rookies deal with NHL call-ups, team competition and formative production while sophomores seemed preoccupied by the opposition. Prime veterans become All-Stars by garnering point production and challenging for the Stanley Cup while seasoned veterans remain relevant through training camps. A discussion about the model’s viability is followed by applications for sport psychology researchers and practitioners. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 5.
    Boberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Persson, Jonathan
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Klubba och Boll är allt som behövs för att ha skoj: En studie om kommunikationens och kommunikationskulturensbetydelse i ett elitsatsande ungdomsinnebandylag2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: When playing in teams, communication is important, not just communication with words but also non-verbal communication such as gestures and body languish. The purpose with this study is to see how there is a co-op among communicating players , between leaders and players and to examine what meaning communication and culture got  in a youth team. The ambition with this study was to increase our knowledge about communication and communicationculture in the youth floorball team. This study is qualitative and was inspired by an ethnographical method so we got the information from observations of a youth floorball team, totally we made four observations. The result were analyzed and categorized from our observation papers. The results where categorized into four headlines, One and two-way communication, Artifacts, The communicationculture of the youth team and actions. The leader got a very important role as communicator and pedagogical leader for the communicationculture that the individual of the group wants to be used in order to promote the development in the team. In the future, more teams needs to be studied to get a more reliable source of information that can be used on a greater populace.

  • 6.
    Chan, Derwin K. C.
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong & Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yang, Sophie X.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia & Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hagger, Martin S.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Response-Order Effects in Survey Methods: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study in the Context of Sport Injury Prevention2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 6, 666-673 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consistency tendency is characterized by the propensity for participants responding to subsequent items in a survey consistent with their responses to previous items. This method effect might contaminate the results of sport psychology surveys using cross-sectional design. We present a randomized controlled crossover study examining the effect of consistency tendency on the motivational pathway (i.e., autonomy support → autonomous motivation → intention) of self-determination theory in the context of sport injury prevention. Athletes from Sweden (N = 341) responded to the survey printed in either low inter-item distance (IID; consistency tendency likely) or high IID (consistency tendency suppressed) on two separate occasions, with a one-week interim period. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups, and they received the survey of different IID at each occasion. Bayesian structural equation modeling showed that low IID condition had stronger parameter estimates than high IID condition, but the differences were not statistically significant. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 7.
    Claeson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Psychological risk factors on rehabilitation on post-surgery and conservative rehabilitation after severe sport injury2008In: : Nordic Conference: Health, participation and effects of sport and exercise / [ed] Carlsson, B., Johnson U., Stambulova, N, 2008, 24- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dahl, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Rolling with the tackles: Helping handball players and coaches cope withclub transition2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study’s purpose was to explore a team’s perception of transition within the clubexperienced by both players and coaches, investigate influences of the clubs transition onbasic needs satisfaction as perceived by players as well as coaches and lastly conduct a shortterm intervention aimed at facilitating players’ adaptation to the clubs transition. The study isbased on three theories: the Athletic Career Transitional Model, Self Determination theoryand the holistic ecological approach. The study’s participants all represented a club in thesouth of Sweden and consisted of a total of 23 players at the age of 15-17 (M= 15,96, SD=0,64), the club manager, coaches and parents. The study was a mixed method interventionstudy (questionnaire, semi-structured interviews and an intervention consisting of educationalsessions and an implementation phase).The study revealed that the club is still facilitating with remnants of its transition despiteover-looking it. The study found the targeted club to predominantly demand elite investmentfrom players, experience barriers regarding individual differences and communication withinthe club and resources in the form of popular, well-educated coaches. The clubs transition wasfound to influence all basic needs in some way, the change in management brought positivevalues with autonomy supportive measures and coaches. Increased elite investment anddeficient communication within the club also influenced basic needs. Results from theintervention are presented as well as implications with a basis in the theories used.

  • 9.
    Edvardsson, Arne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?2012In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), ISSN 1303-2968, Vol. 11, no 2, 331-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney Utests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. © Journal of Sports Science and Medicine.

  • 10.
    Elbe, A.-M.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lintunen, T.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Apitzsch, E.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strengell, A.-M.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Bakker, F.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Boen, F.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Cruz, J.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gernigon, C.
    University Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Papaioannou, A.
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Roberts, G.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Serpa, S.
    Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stelter, R.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Career and Employment Survey for the Former Students of the European Master’s Programme in Sport and Exercise Psychology2009In: Congrès International de Psychologie du Sport, Vincennes, 1-3 juillet 2009: Actes, Paris: Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance (INSEP) , 2009, 121-121 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the European Master’s Programme in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMPSEP) is to pool expertise of 12 European universities within one Master’s programme (see http://www.fepsac.com/). The 60 ECTS European programme provides students with advanced knowledge and skills. The EMPSEP comprises a joint intensive course, a study module similar in all the participating universities, lectures and seminars, a Master’s thesis, and a mobility period of 4-5 months at an EMPSEP host university. Ten years after the graduation of the first students the EMPSEP consortium conducted an online survey. Seventy of the invited 174 former students participated in the study (mean age 31.5 years, SD= 4.7). The aim of the survey was to discover the participants’ employment status and how their participation in the master’s program was related to this. Results indicate that 86% of the participants have started working since they completed their degree. Forty percent of those participants who have started working in their first job have managed to receive a permanent position, 27% a fixed term or temporary job, 25% a part time job, 6% are self employed and 1 person (2%) was employed by subsidies in his/ her first job after graduation. On a scale from extremely dissatisfied (1) to extremely satisfied (6), the participants rated their satisfaction with the program in relation to their career as 4.72 (SD=1.13) on average. Sixty nine of the participants felt that they had benefited from the international network provided by the students and teachers within the programme, and 94% would recommend the European Master’s program to other students in their field.

  • 11.
    Fallhagen, Lisa
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    "Handbollstjejer har korta shorts": normer, identitet och femininisering i ett tjejhandbollslag vid tal om kläder.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här studien handlar om tjejer som spelar handboll och hur de använder sina kläder. Intresset för handbollstjejer kommer från den långa erfarenhet inom handboll och den synliga fenomenet att handbollstjejer använder ”korta shorts”. Syftet med studien är att studera hur handbollstjejer materialiserar kläder genom normer och femininisering samt vilken betydelse den får för identiteten i ett maskulint sammanhang uttryckt i tal om idrottskläder. Tre gruppinterjvuer med ett handbollslag i åldern 14-17 år genomfördes och bearbetades genom en kvalitativ innehållsanalys. I analysen framkom att homogenitet i laget har betydelse för hur tjejerna väljer att klä sig samt att det sker en feminisering av kläderna i den manliga kontexten. Normer och identiteten styr den homogena gruppen genom att det finns oskrivna regler för tjejerna att förhålla sig till samt en handbollsidentitet att leva upp till. Genuskonstruktioner i form av att handbollen ses som en maskulin idrott och feminitet som en anledning till uppvikta shorts.  

  • 12.
    Forslöf, Caroline
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Widén, Sandra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    MÅLSÄTTNING OCH MOTIVATION INOM GYMTRÄNING: En kvantitativ studie baserad på gymaktiva vuxna2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship/effect between goal orientation, needs satisfaction, needs frustration, motivation and training frequency among gym active adults. Based on two working models two hypotheses were designed and tested through mediation analyzes. A quantitative research approach was conducted in which respondents were asked to answer a questionnaire with questions from the following measuring instruments: Godin Leisure- Time Exercise Questionnaire, Task and Ego Goal Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, The Balanced Measure of Psychological Needs and Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire". From a convenience sample, 128 respondents (70 women and 58 men) in the age 19-36 (M = 22.3, SD = 2.5) were recruited who participated in the study. The average number of training sessions/week was about nine for the participants. The study's main finding suggest that task goals positively correlated with identified regulation, intrinsic motivation, satisfaction of the three basic needs and self-determination motivation. There was also a positive correlation between exercise frequency and intrinsic motivation and exercise frequency. The results also showed a positive correlation between ego goals, amotivation and thwarting. The two hypotheses were rejected because the result did not generate any direct media effects. For future research, it is suggested to design studies that aim to investigate how the effect of exercise frequency may be affected depending on the goal orientation, and further suggested studies that investigate thwarting in relation to gym contexts.

  • 13.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish Athletes’ Transition from Junior to Senior Sports: A Quantitative Longitudinal Study2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, 58-58 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the process of the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish athletes. Previous studies showed that the junior-to-senior transition (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts for about two years, (c) known for a high dropout rate and often described by athletes as the most difficult within-career transition (e.g., Bruner et al., 2008; Stambulova, 2009; Vanden Auweele et al., 2004). This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted every six months, and altogether covered two-and-a-half-years with two measurements of the transition variables and one measurement of related personal variables each year. The following package of four instruments was used: the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989) and the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007). In the first measurement 101 club-based Swedish athletes (74 males and 27 females) of 15 -20 years old took part. The dynamics of participants was characterized by an increasing dropout rate from each measurement to the next, and as a result only 37 participants were left to the time of the final (fifth) measurement. Overall dynamics of transitional variables throughout the five measurements was characterized by an increase in motivation and perceived quality of adjustment on the senior athletic level from the first to the third measurement followed by a decrease in these variables across the last two measurements. Decrease in the athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment was especially relevant to their adjustment to senior competitions and to combining sport and studies. Perceived importance of sport (especially of competitions) decreased progressively from the first to the fifth measurement. The other transitional variables (e.g., perceived demands, resources, coping strategies, stress level, need in support) were characterized by various types of dynamics. Meanwhile athletes’ athletic identity and overall satisfaction with their sport and life were rather high and stable across all the five measurements. The next step in the data treatment will be based on the Multilevel Modeling and the Latent Growth Curve Analysis to identify successful and less successful transitional pathways with relevant dynamics and patterns of the transitional and personal variables.

  • 14.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish junior athletes’ personal profiles in relation to the dynamics of adjustment in the junior-to-senior transition2015In: Book of Abstracts of the 20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden / [ed] A. Radmann, S. Hedemborg & E. Tsolakidis, Malmö: European College of Sport Science (ECSS) , 2015, 295-295 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, the junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level, it lasts for 2-4 years, and is known for its high dropout rate. The longitudinal study of the junior-to-senior transition process in Swedish club-based athletes conducted by the authors involved several lines of data analysis with this presentation focusing on the dynamics of athletes’ junior-to-senior transition adjustment in relation to their personal characteristics. The study had five measurements conducted every six months using several instruments; these instruments measured the athletes’ level of athletic identity, task- and ego orientation, self-esteem and adjustment in the transition process. The latent profile analysis identified three profiles (based on athletes personal characteristics; BIC = 771.11; entropy = 0.87; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test = -356.07, p < 0.001). In the profile-1, athletes (34 males and 11 females) were characterized by high athletic identity, self-esteem, task orientation, and the JST motivation; they also had moderately high ego orientation. These athletes perceived to be 72 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived to be 83 % adjusted at the senior level. In the profile-2, athletes (30 males and 7 females) perceived themselves to have high self-esteem and the JST motivation, relatively high athletic identity and task orientation complemented by moderate ego orientation. They perceived themselves to be 66 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 73% adjusted. In the profile-3 athletes (9 males and 9 females) reported high self-esteem, relatively high task orientation, as well as moderate athletic identity, ego orientation and the JST motivation. These athletes perceived to be 62 % adjusted at the first measurement, had almost no progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 64 % adjusted. These findings supported our hypothesis that athletes with different profiles of personal characteristics follow different pathways through the JST process. The JST pathways are going to be explored more in detail with the aim to understand transition variables contributing to the dynamics of perceived adjustment. Further this knowledge can be used in assisting athletes in the JST.

  • 15.
    Hembjer, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ek, Jimmy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Vad är en god arbetsmiljö? En kvalitativ studie om arbetsmiljö och hälsa bland undersköterskor.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning: Syftet med studien var att beskriva hur undersköterskor upplever attarbetsmiljön påverkar hälsan.Metod: Sex stycken undersköterskor intervjuades. Urvalet skedde genom ettbekvämlighetsurval där den kommunala verksamheten valde arbetsplats där intervjuernagenomfördes. Intervjuguiden täckte områden som självupplevd hälsa, hälsofrämjande faktorersamt kontroll och inflytande på arbetsplatsen. Data analyserades efter en kvalitativ temaanalysdär förekommande teman valdes ut.Resultat: Det tema som undersköterskorna upplevde som hälsofrämjande på arbetsplatsen vardet sociala samspelet. Jobbtillfredsställelsen bland undersköterskorna identifierades somundersköterskornas känsla av att det var roligt på jobbet och var även kopplat till densjälvupplevda hälsan. Det som upplevdes bland undersköterskorna som anledning till stress påarbetsplatsen var den kommande omorganisationen där undersköterskornas kontrollminskade.Implikation: Resultatet av studien kan ha betydelse genom ett bidragande till en ökadförståelse om arbetsmiljö och dess påverkan på hälsa. Arbetsplatser inom vård- och omsorgkan bli mer hälsofrämjande och bidra med hälsovinster i form av färre dagar medsjukersättning som skulle vara en ekonomisk fördel.

  • 16.
    Hutton, Katrin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Affecta Psychiatric clinic, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Low self-rated mental health among Swedish adolescent boys and its relationship to socioeconomic factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adolescents mental health is a major public health concern and studies have shown that socioeconomic factors contribute to the experienced health of adolescents. Girls’ mental health, more than boys’ mental health, is often discussed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-rated mental health and socioeconomic factors among boys and we hypothesized that household wealth influences the association.

    Methods

    In 2011, a cross-sectional study was conducted at seven junior high schools in a medium sized town in south western Sweden. The data collected was based on a self-administrated questionnaire regarding socioeconomic factors, household wealth and health related quality of life (Minnesota Minneapolis Quality of Life Instrument (MMQL). In all, 235 boys between 11-13 years old and 254 boys between 14-16 years participated. The items from MMQL were summarized into a total score and dichotomized by the median and low self-rated mental health was defined as below median. Logistic regression analysis was used.

    Results

    Among younger boys no association between low self-rated mental health and socioeconomic factors were seen. Among older boys with divorced parents, an increased risk of low mental health rating was seen OR: 1.83 (95%CI, 1.04;3.23), however when adjusting for household wealth the association disappeared (OR;1.76, CI 0.98;3.15). Also, having one or two parents born outside Sweden implied increased risk of a low self-rated mental health OR: 2.0 (CI; 1.15;3.47), which remained when adjusting for household wealth variables (OR; 2.16 CI; 1.17;3.99). Furthermore, having two or more negative socioeconomic variables increased the risk of low rated mental health (OR;2.60, CI 1.15;5.90) the association remained after adjusting for household wealth (OR;2.38, CI 1.03;5.33).

    Conclusions

    Boys with divorced parents, boys from migrant backgrounds and boys with several negative socioeconomic factors constituted the identified subgroups at risk. More research in public health is essential to meet the special needs of different age groups and backgrounds among adolescent boys.

    Key messages

    • Among older boys (14-16 years old) with divorced parents, an increased risk of low mental health rating was seen, however when adjusting for household wealth the association disappeared.
    • Among older boys (14-16 years old) having two or more negative socioeconomic variables increased the risk of low rated mental health, the association remained after adjusting for household wealth.

    © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Hutton, Katrin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Affecta psychiatric out-patients clinic, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Kadrija, Ibadete (Contributor)
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Self-rated mental health and socio-economic background: a study of adolescents in Sweden2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 1, 394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescents' mental health is a major public health issue. Previous research has shown that socio-economic factors contribute to the health status of adolescents. The present study explores the association between socio-economic status and self-rated mental health among adolescents.

    Methods: Cross sectional data from the Halmstad Youth Quality of Life cohort was collected in a town in Sweden. In all, 948 adolescents (11-13 younger age group and 14-16 older age group) participated. Information on self-rated mental health was collected from the subscale Psychological functioning in the Minneapolis Manchester Quality of Life instrument. The items were summarized into a total score and dichotomized by the mean. Indicators measuring socio-economic status (SES) were collected in a questionnaire using the Family Affluence Scale (FAS) and additional factors regarding parents' marital status and migration were added. Logistic models were used to analyze the data.

    Results: Girls were more likely to rate their mental health below the mean compared to boys. With regard to FAS (high, medium, low), there was a significantly increased risk of self-rated mental health below the mean among younger boys in the medium FAS score OR; 2.68 (95% CI 1.35;5.33) and among older boys in the low FAS score OR; 2.37 (1.02;5.52) compared to boys in the high FAS score. No such trend was seen among girls. For younger girls there was a significant protective association between having parents born abroad and self-rated mental health below mean OR: 0.47 (0.24;0.91).

    Conclusions: A complex pattern of associations between SES and self-rated mental health, divergent between age and gender groups, was shown. The total FAS score was only associated with boys' self-rated mental health in both age groups, whereas parents' migratory status influenced only the girls' self-rated mental health. Because of the different association for girls' and boys' self-rated mental health and SES, other factors than SES should also be considered when investigating and exploring the mental health of adolescents in affluent communities. © 2014 Hutton et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 18.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Vad är ett meningsfullt resultat?2012In: Flow, ISSN 1654-2533, no 2, 3 p.4-6 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    What counts as ”Evidence” in Evidence-Based practice? Searching for some fire behind all the smoke2016In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 7, no 1, 11-22 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some sorts of “evidence” in evidence-based practice seem to carry more weight (e.g., randomized controlled trials; RCTs) than others (e.g., case studies) in applied sport and exercise psychology research. In this article we explore some of the shibboleths of evidence-based treatment, and how some “gold standards,” such as RCTs (as they are often used or misused) may, when sub-optimally executed, provide only tenuous, incomplete, and confounded evidence for what we choose to do in practice. We inquire into the relevance and meaningfulness of practitioner-evacuated research and investigations that use flawed statistical reasoning, and we also ask a central question in evaluating evidence: just because some sorts of positive changes can be measured and counted in various treatment outcome research, do they really “count?” © 2016 Association for Applied Sport Psychology

  • 20.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Things We Still Haven’t Learned (So Far)2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, no 4, 449-461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is like an immortal horse that some researchers have been trying to beat to death for over 50 years, but without any success. In this article we discuss the flaws in NHST, the historical background in relation to both Fisher’s and Neyman-Pearson’s statistical ideas, the common misunderstandings of what p < .05 actually means, and the APA Manual’s (2010) clear, but most often ignored, instructions to report effect sizes and interpret what they all mean in the real world. Also, we discuss how Bayesian statistics can be used to overcome some of the problems with NHST. We then analyze quantitative articles in two of the highest impact factor journals in sport and exercise psychology in the last three years (2012–2014) to determine if we have learned what we should have learned decades ago about the use and meaningful interpretations of the statistics we use. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 21.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Are all predicted relationships linear by nature? A note about quantile regression in sport and exercise psychology2014In: Athletic Insight: The Online Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 1536-0431, E-ISSN 1947-6299, Vol. 6, no 2, 115-123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data in sport and exercise psychology research are often analyzed based on the assumption that the relationships between two or more variables are linear in nature. But are all relationships in sport and exercise settings linear? The aim of this paper is to: a) discuss the potential shortcomings with using linear regression analysis, b) introduce quantile regression analysis (Q-regression) as an alternative to linear regression, and c) give examples of how to use Q-regression analysis in order to overcome some of the shortcomings of linear regression analysis. A comparison between the results from a linear regression analysis and a Q-regression analysis shows differences between the two methods. More specifically, the independent variables in the results of the Q-regression analysis were shown to have non-linear relationships with the dependent variable in given examples. Researchers are encouraged to consider using Q-regression analysis in studies where non-linear relationships could be expected.

  • 22.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychosocial predictors of sport injury rates: A meta-analysis2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, 173-174 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport injury prediction research has traditionally focused on physiological and physical factors. Nevertheless, during the last 30 years there has been increased interest in psychosocial factors related to sport injuries. The most cited theoretical model developed to explain psychosocial variables’ influences on injury risk is the model of stress and athletic injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). The model, suggests that personality (e.g., anxiety, hardiness), history of stressors (e.g., life event stress, daily hassles), and coping (e.g., social support resources) will influence athletes’ stress responses (e.g., physiological, attentional changes) that, in turn, are related to injury risk. The aim of the study was to examine the past research on the relationships of the psychosocial variables in the model (i.e., personality, history of stressors, coping, stress responses) on sport injury rates. The literature review resulted in 47 published studies and 180 effect sizes. The results showed that stress responses (r = .22, 80% CI = .14 - .30) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Moreover, history of stressors (r = .12, 80% CI = .11 - .13) and coping (r = -.05, 80% CI = -.03 - -.08) had smaller relationships with injury rates. Finally, the associations of positive (r = .01, 80% CI = -.03 - .04), as well as negative (r = .01, 80% CI = -.01-.03) personality variables on injury rates was marginal. The results support the model’s suggestion that stress responses have a direct relationship with injury, whereas other variables potentially have indirect relationships with injury rates. In line with these findings it is suggested that intervention programs should focus on helping athletes decrease the magnitude of their stress responses. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 23.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Edvardsson, Arne
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Psychologically based programs for injury prevention in football: a meta-analysis2015In: Program and Abstracts: 8th World Congress on Science and Football Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015 / [ed] Jens Bangsbo and Peter Krustrup, Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee , 2015, 69-70 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have found that stress increases the risk for sport injuries. It is therefore suggested that psychologically based intervention programs, targeting perceived stress, could decrease injury risk. The objective of the study, using a meta-analysis procedure, was to evaluate the effect of psychologically based interventions, performed in football populations and based on documented injury rates. A literature search founded on the electronic databases; PsycINFO, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar were examined using combinations of key words, such as ‘sports injury’, ‘psychology’, ‘intervention’ ‘prevention’ ‘soccer’ and ‘football’. The literature review resulted in three studies that together contained 100 participants. The interventions were based on different approaches such as mindfulness, and mental skills training. All studies, included in the analysis, reported fewer injuries for the experimental groups in comparison to the control groups (Cohen’s d effect sizes 0.89, 0.59, and 1.27). The overall results correspond to a Cohen’s d effect size of 0.86, p <.001, (95 % CI 0.44-1.28). The result indicated that psychologically based intervention programs have potential to decrease the risk of sport injuries in football populations. These results are in line with intervention studies performed within others sports (e.g. floorball). One reason for the effectiveness of the intervention could be that all three were offering stress management education. Because sport injuries have a negative impact on athletes, teams and communities, athletes are recommended to work with psychological training programs as a part of their injury prevention work. © The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee

  • 24.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Could level and change in psychosocial stress during a 7 week period predict sport injuries in a population of professional soccer players?2012In: Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Science and Soccer, 2012, 163-163 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Itroduction: Involvement in competitive soccer is connected with a high injury rate (Hägglund, 2007). Previous research has suggested that a psychosocial stress (both major and minor stressors) have a great impact on injury risk (Rogers & Landers, 2005; Fawkner et al., 1999).

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate if individual level and change in psychosocial stress (daily hassle) during a 7 week period could predict injuries among Swedish Premiere League soccer players.

    Method: The participants were 56 (38 males and 18 females) Swedish Premiere League soccer players. Participants ranged in age from 16 – 36 years (M = 25, 05, SD = 5, 46). Participants completed the Hassle and Uplift Scale once a week for a 7-week period. During the research period, the physiotherapists for each team were asked to record any injuries occurring during the study period. Latent grpwth curve models were used to examine whether the level and change in psychological stress could predict the frequency of injury over the 7 week period.

    Result: The results showed that both high initial levels of daily hassle and negative changes in it were associated with more injuries. Moreover, intra-class correlation showed that 23,4 % of the variance in hassle over the 7 repeated observations could be explained by the within-person variance, whereas the majority of variance (76,6%) could be attributed to between-person variance.

    Discussion: The findings highlight the importance of focusing on state variables using prospective designs and appropriate change analysis in order to detect complex and dynamic associations across time in injury prediction research. It is also important to acknowledging and investigating individual differeces in order to understand how psychosocial stressors influence different athletes. Recommendations for players, coaches and physiotherapies are to be observant of the influence from daily hassles in order to be able to help the athlete to decrease injury risk by for example adjusting his/her training load due to psychological status.

  • 25.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, 241-242 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the career literature, an injury is termed as a non-normative transition (e.g., Stambulova & Wylleman, 2014), and therefore, it is implied that there is a process behind it. But the injury transition process has never been in focus of the career researchers in sport psychology, and therefore this study is a pioneering exploration unpacking this process. The study was designed as a single subject case study based on a constructivist narrative approach with the objectives (1) to explore the athlete’s career development, injuries within the career and their impact, and (2) to explore in detail the athlete’s injury experiences. The participant was a 26 years old former handball player who had experienced two major ACL-injuries during his career. To guide the research process from formulation of the research objectives and to interpretation of narratives, the narrative oriented inquiry framework or NOI (Hiles & Čermak, 2008) was followed. Following combination of the holistic-content and the categorical content analyses allowed conceptualizing injuries as career transition processes embedded into the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made possible to identify four phases in the injury transition (i.e., pre-injury, injury and first reactions, diagnosis and treatment, rehabilitation and consequences) with distinct psychological content (e.g., demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each phase. Based on the results of the study it is possible to anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of the sport medicine teams might benefit from being aware about specific demands and barriers relevant to the different phases of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes with rehabilitation process and successful comeback to active sport involvement. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 26.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Sambanden mellan fettintag och hjärt-kärlsjukdom kan vara vilseledande i meta-analyser2014In: Dietistaktuellt, ISSN 1102-9285, Vol. 23, no 6, 30-34 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Meta-analyser formar våra kostråd och de är därför viktiga att analysera. Artikeln diskuterar rimligheten i att relatera en kostkomponent, i detta fall fettsyror, och relatera dessa till sjukdom och död. Reduktionismen och nutritionismen ifrågasätts. Ett komplement till detta synsätt bör finnas med där man studerar mat, livsmedel och kostmönster istället för att relatera sjukdom och död till en kostkomponent. En helhetssyn på livet där hela kosten finns som en del av andra levnadsvanor bör finnas med när man analyserar livsstilsrelaterade och multifaktoriella sjukdomar.

  • 27.
    Johansson, Gunvi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Periodontology and Oral Public Health, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Department of Periodontology and Oral Public Health, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    Deparment of Behavioural and Community Dentistry, Institution of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Borås, Sweden.
    Young adults' views on the relevance of three measures for oral health-related quality of life2015In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 13, no 3, 184-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to explore the views of young adults on the relevance of three measures of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL).

    Methods

    Sixteen young adults aged 21–29 years were interviewed. The selection was strategic with reference to age (21–25 years.; 26–30 years), sex and education (university degree; upper secondary school). The interview guide covered areas on the content and construction of the measures: The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP), the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) and the Oral Health-Related Quality of Life UK (OHRQoL-UK). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    A theme expressing the latent content was formulated during the data analysis: ‘young adults' own experiences were reflected in their views on the OHRQoL measures’; that is, the experiences of young adults of own oral problems and aspects that were found to be especially important for their age group influenced their view on the measures. The self-reported ability to understand and answer the questions varied and the perceived advantages and disadvantages were almost equally distributed among the three measures.

    Conclusions

    The OHIP, OIDP and OHRQoL-UK were evaluated as being equal by the young adults in this study, with regard both to their pros and cons. The clarity of the measures was regarded as the most important factor, while the length and assessment period were less significant.

    © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 28.
    Johansson, Gunvi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Behavioural and Community Dentistry, Institution of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    Department of Behavioural and Community Dentistry, Institution of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Borås, Sweden.
    Oral health-related quality of life in Swedish young adultsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The living conditions of young adults in Sweden have changed during the last decades, due to the economic and employment situation in society. Although oral health is mainly considered to be good in this age group, their use of dental care has decreased and their priorities and opportunities regarding oral health are little known. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the views of Swedish young adults on their oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The design of the study was qualitative, using content analysis. Sixteen young adults, aged 21 to 29 years, were interviewed. The findings from the interviews were summarized under the theme “The perceived control of OHRQOL of young adults is dependent on their future prospects of oral health, in relation to their perceptions of past and present own oral health,” consisting of three categories: Past experience, Present situation and Future prospects. The OHRQoL of young adults is dependent on their experiences of own oral health during childhood and their received dental care, but also on their present self-perceived oral health, oral health habits and social life together with their expectations of future oral health. The findings in the study indicate that the oral health awareness and needs of young adults, as well as their expectations of oral care, merit further follow-up.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Gunvi
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland, Borås, Sweden.
    Oral health-related quality of life in Swedish young adults2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, 27125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The living conditions of young adults in Sweden have changed during the last decades due to the economic and employment situation in society. Although oral health is mainly considered to be good in this age group, their use of dental care has decreased and their priorities and opportunities regarding oral health are little known. The purpose of this study was to describe the views of Swedish young adults on their oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The design of the study was qualitative, using content analysis. Sixteen young adults, aged 21-29 years, were interviewed. The findings from the interviews were summarized under the theme "Young adults reflected on their OHRQoL in a time perspective" consisting of three categories: "Past experiences, Present situation, and Future prospects." The OHRQoL of young adults is dependent not only on their own experiences of oral health during childhood and their received dental care but also on their present self-perceived oral health, oral health habits, and social life; together with their expectations of future oral health. The findings in this study indicate that the oral health awareness and needs of young adults, as well as their expectations of oral care, merit further follow-up. © 2015 G. Johansson & A.-L. Östberg.

  • 30.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Cultural Challenges Working with a Gymnast and His Coach in Preparation of Olympic Qualification Tournament 2004: A Swedish-Russian Case2008In: Journal of Tianjin University of Sport, ISSN 1005-0000, Vol. 23, no 3, 186-187 p.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Psychosocial antecedents and the occurrence of sport injury among competitive athletes2009In: Congrès International de Psychologie du Sport, Vincennes, 1-3 juillet 2009: Actes, Paris: Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance (INSEP) , 2009, 123-123 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulated research over the last decade has focused on psychosocial variables and its influence on injury vulnerability and resiliency. Researchers have generally found that individuals who have experienced many recent stressors and who did not have the personal resources and skills to cope with the stressors were most at risk for injuries. In this study psychosocial risk factors related to the occurrence of sport injuries for athletes were studied. Sixty competitive athletes, who earlier had received a moderate or severe injury, were interviewed. In 16 of the cases (26%) there was a potential connection between psychosocial events and the occurrence of a sport injury accident among the injured athletes. The psychosocial event occurred between 1-14 days prior to accident. The mean age of the study group was 20.8 years, including 9 men and 7 women representing 13 team and 3 individual sports. Knee and foot injuries dominated, and the average rehabilitation time was about 30 weeks. Twenty-five different psychosocial antecedents were identified through a deductive and inductive content analysis. A majority of the antecedents (76%) were related to history of stressors such as work related worry, start of a new and demanding education and a recent change of sport club and/or trainers. Most of the injuries seem to be connected to general stress and worry in life outside the sports world. In conclusion, it is vital for coaches and leaders in sport to understand the near relationship between psychosocial stressors and the occurrence of injury. A holistic perspective on preventive issues has potential to significantly decrease injury occurrence in sport.

  • 32.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Fallby, Johan
    Idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sverige & Svenska Fotbollförbundet, Utvecklingsenheten, Solna, Sverige.
    Idrottspsykologisk rådgivning – en kritisk diskussion2004In: SIPF: Svensk Idrottspsykologisk Förening, Årsbok 2004 / [ed] Peter Hassmén & Nathalie Hassmén, Örebro: Svensk idrottspsykologisk förening (SIPF) , 2004, 58-70 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Karlsson, Jón
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Waldén, Markus
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden & Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rehabilitation after first-time anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction in female football players: a study of resilience factors2016In: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2052-1847, Vol. 8, 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Most of the research in the area of psychosocial factors in rehabilitation after sports injuries has focused on risk behaviors, while relatively few studies have focused on behaviors that facilitate rehabilitation. The objective of our study was to understand the psychosocial features that characterize elite female football players who express a resilient behaviour during rehabilitation after a first-time anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction.

    Methods

    A qualitative method was used based on individual in-person interviews and video communication of players who incurred a first-time ACL tear during the 2012 season of the Swedish Women’s Elite Football League. In total, 13 players had a first-time ACL and were interviewed post-season. The interviews were followed by a thematic content analysis. Based on this, eight players were identified as showing resilient behaviors during their rehabilitation and were included in the final analysis.

    Results

    Three core themes representing psychosocial factors that help players cope successfully with rehabilitation were identified: (I) constructive communication and rich interaction with significant others; (II) strong belief in the importance and efficacy of one’s own actions; and (III) the ability to set reasonable goals.

    Conclusions

    The findings suggest three core themes of psychosocial factors that characterize first-time ACL-injured elite female football players showing resilience during rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Suggestions for medical teams about ways to support communication, self-efficacy, and goal-setting during the rehabilitation process, are provided. © 2016 The Author(s).

  • 34.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Towards removing performance barriers: Prediction of burnout in female elite soccer players2013In: International Week of Sport Psychology FEPSAC: Conference Proceedings, May 18th-19th 2013, 2013, 24-24 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the study by Stambulova and Johnson* from 2010 it is reported that applied sport psychology (ASP) literature reveals several publications on reflective practice and professional philosophies. Still, few studies focus how novice consultants make the first steps in their careers. The objective of this lecture is to discuss lessons learned by students during their one-year ASP education and supervised practice in Sweden. In total thirty-seven ASP students took part in the study. Information was gathered from the students' final reports on their six-month interventions with athlete clients. Four categories were created named professional tools, consultant & client relationship, learning process and experiences, and professional philosophy and organized into three levels reflecting the students' learning process with the shifts from analysis to synthesis and from concrete to more generalized and strategic lessons learned. In the lecture results are discussed using career development, scientist-practitioner and cultural sport psychology perspectives.

  • 35.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Kenttä, Göran
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Alvmyren, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    An ultra-runner's experience of physical and emotional challenges during a 10-week continental run2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 14, no 1, 72-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between self-report measures such as mood state, emotional recovery, and perceived exertion for a runner during a continental run. Second, the purpose was to examine psychological factors that enable an ultra-distance runner during an event. A case study report from a 49-year-old female ultra-distance runner, running a 3641 kilometre adventure event during a 10-week period was made. Data were collected during 15 weeks with three self-report questionnaires – more specifically, an initial report 3 weeks prior to the run, a weekly report during the 10 weeks of running, and, finally, a report 2 weeks after the run. In addition, a follow-up narrative interview was performed nine months after the run was completed. The main result showed that perceived exertion level had a statistically significant negative relationship with negative mood and a positive statistically significant relationship with positive mood. Results also showed a statistically significant difference between the three measurement points based on the variable perceived exertion level. In addition, the runner's narration suggested four main categories of psychologically assisting attributes: motivation, group cohesiveness, self-awareness, and mental stamina. The findings highlight the complex balance between extreme physical load and feelings of comfort and elevated mood. Another finding is that the joint effect of different psychological factors – especially the runner's high self-awareness, strong-minded attitude, and ability to use humour in problematic situations – was helpful during the run. Practical and methodological implications, as well strategies for further research, are provided. © 2015 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 36.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Editorial to the QHW Thematic Cluster “Health, Physical Activity and Lifestyle”2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, 29156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Current Status and Future Challenges in Psychological Research of Sport Injury Prediction and Prevention: A Methodological Perspective2014In: Revista de Psicología del Deporte, ISSN 1132-239X, Vol. 23, no 2, 401-409 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this critical review was to propose methodological developments in sport injury prediction and prevention research. Altogether, 24 studies (e.g., quantitative, qualitative, and prevention intervention studies) conducted from 2006 forward were analysed, related to the “stress-injury model.” The injury prediction studies were mostly based on prospective designs, using regression analysis, and studied trait anxiety and life stress. The qualitative studies used mainly thematic analysis, and the intervention studies showed some promising effects, but also inconclusive results. We proposed five specific needs for future research: (a) focus on separate research cohorts, (b) variation in preventive intervention designs, including sound protocols conducting experimental studies, (c) focus on behaviours in relation to cognition, (d) application of repeated-measure designs, and (e) use of statistics that could test complex interactions and intraindividual differences. Future research attention should also be oriented towards the psychology of overuse injuries, biopsychosocial perspectives, and health economic evaluations. While progress has been made in research on psychological antecedents of sport injury, prevention, and intervention in the last 10-15 years, several methodological issues still remain to be further developed, as outlined in this article.

  • 38.
    Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Rapportering av Projekt "Motionsbeteenden": Exercise motivation and improvement of web based health promotion services2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det övergripande syftet med projektet var att undersöka motionsbeteenden, målsättning och motivation till motion bland Tappas medlemmar. Ett delsyfte var att skapa underlag till implikationer för att kunna optimera webbtjänsten ur ett motivationsorienterat perspektiv. Deltagarna (n= 1262) var aktiva medlemmar i www.Tappa.se och datainsamling skedde i form av ett webbaserat frågeformulär bestående av flera motionsrelaterade instrument, bl.a The Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale, Barriers Self-Efficacy Scale, Physical Activity Stages of Change Questionnaire 2:1, The Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, m.fl. Resultaten visade att Tappas medlemmar generellt har en självbestämmande motivationsprofil, att de vanligaste målsättningarna är kopplade till hälsohantering och utseende och att deltagarna inte upplever någon större förändring av faktorer som kondition, självkänsla och humör efter inträdet i Tappa. Vidare visar resultaten demografiska skillnader på flera undersökta variabler. Slutsatsen är att det sannolikt vore framgångsrikt att teoribasera Tappas verksamhet och tjänster, företrädesvis utifrån självbestämmande, självtillit och stegbaserad förändringsbenägenhet. I sin nuvarande form når Tappa sannolikt inte individer som befinner sig i förnekelsestadiet vilket är en utmaning för vidare utveckling av tjänsten, likväl som för motionsfrämjande verksamhet i allmänhet. En omfokusering av Tappas tjänster från viktkontroll till hälsoupplevelser och hälsoeffekter kan ha gynnsam inverkan på medlemmarnas motivation samt locka fler män till Tappa. För att framgångsrikt implementera motionsinterventioner på arbetsplatsen krävs strategiska satsningar på motivations- och engagemangsskapande metoder. Slutligen rekommenderas bruk av kvalificerad kompetens inom beteendevetenskap för motionsfrämjande insatser.

  • 39.
    Josefsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Broberg, Anders G.
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Effects of a Short-term Mindfulness Based Intervention on Self-reported Mindfulness, Decentering, Executive Attention, Psychological Health, and Coping Style: Examining Unique Mindfulness Effects and Mediators2014In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 5, no 1, 18-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of mindfulness intervention studies do not include active control groups. To examine potential unique effects of mindfulness practice and to study the mechanism responsible for beneficial mental health effects associated with mindfulness-based interventions, the present study compared mindfulness meditation with an active control group in a randomised controlled trial. A short-term mindfulness-based intervention (n = 46) was compared with both an active control group—relaxation training (n = 40)—and an inactive wait-list group (n = 40) on self-reported mindfulness and decentering, executive attention, psychological well-being, anxiety, depression, and coping style, in an adult working population with no prior meditation experience. Analyses of covariance showed that the mindfulness group scored higher than the wait-list group on self-reported mindfulness and psychological well-being. However, no differences were found on decentering, anxiety, depression, executive attention, or coping style. Moreover, the study failed to distinguish any unique mindfulness effects since there were no differences between mindfulness and relaxation on any of the variables. Simple mediation analyses, using a bootstrap approach, revealed that decentering acted as a mediator between self-reported mindfulness and psychological well-being. The length of the intervention, the similarities between body scan exercises in MBI and relaxation, and the absence of decentering effects may partly explain the lack of distinct MBI effects, suggesting that MBIs aimed at increasing well-being and problem-focused coping whilst reducing psychological symptoms in a working population should be longer than merely 4 weeks and include more than seven sessions. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 40.
    Kentää, Göran
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Forskningsgruppen för idrottspsykologi.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletic identity as a predictor of overtraining and injury among elite Swedish athletes2015In: Proceedings, 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, 14-19 July 2015 in Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Schmid, Olivier; Seiler, Roland, Bern: University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science , 2015, 326- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overtraining syndrome (OTS) is a complex multidimensional construct encompassing alterations in biochemistry, physiology, and mental states. Evidence indicates that overtrained athletes are at an increased risk for outcomes such as injury and illness (Vetter & Symonds, 2010). Limited research however, has examined psychosocial factors associated with OTS. One psychosocial factor that has been linked to an increased likelihood of deleterious states such as burnout and injury is athletic identity (Black & Smith, 2007; Coakley, 1992). Given these findings, there is reason to believe that athletes who strongly identify with the athlete role may also be more susceptible to overtraining syndrome, which may in turn increase the risk for chronic injury. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between athletic identity, overtraining syndrome, and injury occurrence/frequency. To evaluate our study purposes, 628 Swedish athletes competing at the highest national level, completed a validated measure of athletic identity (AIMS; Brewer et al., 1993), a "training practice inventory" used in previous overtraining research (Kentta et al. 2001), and injury occurrence/frequency. Linear regression analyses revealed that athletic identity significantly predicted the physiological aspect of overtraining syndrome (β = 0.118, p = .003, adjusted R2 = .012), a greater likelihood of injury occurrence (β = 0.078, P = .05, adjusted R2 = .004), and a greater injury frequency (β = 0.119, P = .03, adjusted R2 = .013). Although the results are statistically significant, the shared variances between the variables are small (approx. 1%), suggesting caution in interpreting results from the present study. Our findings do however, provide a preliminary link between a high athletic identity, excessive training, and injury. Careful consideration by coaches and sport leaders should therefore be given in promoting too strong an identification with the athlete role.

  • 41.
    Klavina, Aija
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Sport Medicine and Adapted Physical Activity, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga, Latvia.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Hammar, Lena
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Örebro, Sweden.
    Soulie, Tine
    Danish Disability Sport Information Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cooperative oriented learning in inclusive physical education2014In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, no 2, 119-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the implementation of cooperation directed learning of peer tutoring in elementary general inclusive physical education (GPE) setting in three elementary city schools in Sweden was studied. The purpose was to assess the impact of peer tutoring on the interaction behaviours between students with and without disabilities in GPE. A design of multiple case study with elementary school age students with moderate disabilities (n = 4) was used. Peer tutors (n = 37) were students without disabilities who voluntary participated in a peer tutor training programme. The programme included the collaborative learning values, teaching instructions and communication skills served as the independent measure. Dependent measures were multiple interactions between students with and without disabilities. Data to the case studies were collected through a design of mixed methods, containing both quantitative and qualitative data. Totally 43 observation sessions of inclusive GPE settings were collected on videotapes and analysed using the Computerized Evaluation Protocol of Interactions in Physical Education (CEPI-PE). In addition, interviews with school personnel and children served as a complementary study outcome. The percentage of interactions between target students and peer tutors significantly increased (3.2–11.8%, respectively, p < .05) during peer tutor intervention. This study indicated that peer tutor arrangements can contribute the successful cooperation between students with and without disabilities in inclusive GPE in Swedish elementary school. All four students with moderate disabilities maintained high percentage of activities done independently throughout baseline and intervention phase (50.5 and 57.6%, accordingly). Qualitative data throughout field notes and interviews with school personnel and pupils confirmed a positive class climate change and improvement in peer relation culture. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  • 42.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Adapted Physical Activity in Nordic countries2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Nordiska perspektiv på Anpassad Fysisk Aktivitet och Parasport – en jämförelse mellan Danmark, Finland, Norge och Sverige2015In: Program Svebi 2015, 2015, 16-16 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Människor med funktionsnedsättning har i dag inte lika stora möjligheter att utöva idrott, fysisk aktivitet och rekreation i jämförelse med människor utan funktionsnedsättning. Det kan också noteras att fritid, rekreation och semester för många med funktionsnedsättning har en större betydelse i den enskilda situationen än andra, till exempel när det gäller inkludering och tillgänglighet i fysisk aktivitet och idrott & hälsa samt graden av välbefinnande. I de nordiska länderna finns det en enighet om funktionsnedsattas rättigheter, villkor och integration, inkludering. Det finns också en medvetenhet och ett intresse att arbeta med människor med funktionsnedsättning, som gynnar interaktion och dialog mellan länderna. Anpassad Fysisk Aktivitet (AFA) har blivit en universell term, omfattande områden som idrott och hälsa, fritid, parasport, habilitering och rehabilitering för människor med funktionsnedsättning. En av framtida utmaningar och forskningsfrågor är hur AFA-begreppet kan etableras inom skola, sjukvård, idrottsrörelse, fritid samt hur kunskapen om anpassad fysisk aktivitet kan öka inom de 4 områdena.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram

    Syftet är att presentera olika nordiska handlingssätt, forskning och utvecklingsprojekt som hänför sig till anpassad fysisk aktivitet och parasport utifrån en nyss avhållen nordisk forsknings- och utbildningskonferens i Finland. Den teoretiska ramen knyter an till Sherrills (2004) holistiska Adapted Physical Activity model som har en övergripande målsättning att stimulera till och uppnå en aktiv, hälsosam livsstil och självförverkligande för alla.

    Metod

    Metoden har en komparativ ansats genom att försöka uppmärksamma skillnader och likheter i Anpassad Fysisk Aktivitet och Parasport inom de nordiska länderna samt att pröva och förstå och förklara dessa perspektiv.

    Resultat

    Resultatet är under bearbetning och presenteras bl a utifrån följande frågeställningar:

    • Hur många Euro avsätter staten och offentlig sport administration detta år till anpassade fysiska aktiviteter?

    • Vilka organisationer är de ledande på nationell nivå (finansiering, idrott, funktionsnedsättning, forskning, idrott och hälsa i skolan och rehabilitering)?

    • Ungefär hur många deltagare finns numera i organiserad AFA-verksamhet (exklusive idrott och hälsa i skolan, vilket är obligatoriskt)?

    • Hur många idrottsorganisationer för personer med funktionsnedsättning eller kroniska sjukdomar får statligt stöd för sin verksamhet?

    • Hur organiseras samordningen på nationell nivå i AFA?

    • Vilka har varit de största förändringarna under de senaste ett eller två åren i AFA på nationell nivå?

    • Finns det några tecken på strategisk utveckling inom integrering eller inkludering?

    Diskussion

    De nordiska länderna har många likheter i sin syn på människor med funktionsnedsättning. Ett närmare samarbete inom kunskapsområdet anpassad fysisk aktivitet och parasport innebär ökade förutsättningar för människor med funktionsnedsättningar att få tillfredsställa sina rörelsebehov, uppleva rörelseglädje, rekreation och gemenskap. Sammantaget ger detta en ökad möjlighet till en hälsobefrämjande livsstil. De nordiska länderna kan dra nytta och lära av varandras erfarenheter inom kunskapsområdet, vilket gagnar ett utbyte på såväl student- som lärarnivå. I ett nordiskt perspektiv kan forskning och utbildning inom anpassad fysisk aktivitet och parasport spela en viktig roll som ett komplement till europeiska och internationella forsknings- och utbildningsprogram.

  • 44.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Challenges for Intervention Research in Health and Lifestyle Research – A Systematic Meta-literature Review2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Health and well-being are two concepts that are widely discussed within today’s society. A major perspective in health and lifestyle research is to investigate what determinants are associated with health. When it comes to the delivery of health interventions several different approaches have been suggested.

    Methods

    The meta-synthesis was chosen for synthesis of research studies using a health and lifestyle the review format and analyse meta-questions. The process included the following five phases:

    1. Literature search for articles.

    2. Selection of relevant articles after repeated reading and appraisal of the articles.

    3. Extraction of data from each article and creating a list of findings as key phrases, ideas and concepts for each individual study.

    4. Determining how the findings of the selected studies are related and translating findings into one another.

    5. Synthesizing the translations to produce a new theoretical interpretation.

    Results

    The search yielded a total of 561 unique citations and finally 24 citations remained. Of those 11 studies focused on health determinants, while 13 focused on interventions for health promotion. The meta-synthesis led to four recommendations for the design of future intervention studies. (1) scientific disciplines should collaborate in the design, implementation and evaluation of the study. (2) to use theoretical frameworks that focus on health determinants and to apply longitudinal studies with a repeated measures design.(3) involve behavioral interventions. (4) to design face-to-face intervention studies.

    Discussion

    Determinants was related to a physical active lifestyle, more specifically high quality school programs for physical education. It could be a starting point for a nationwide approach of daily physical activity in whole society. In all intervention studies physical activity behaviors were included as outcome or intervention program. It is therefore speculated that physical activity behavior could be discussed as one mediator between health determinants and health outcomes.

    References

    Bailey, R. (2006). Physical education and sport in schools: a review of benefits and outcomes. Journal of School Health, 76, 397-401.

    Dodge, R., Daly, A., Huyton, J., & Sanders, L. (2012). The challenge of defining wellbeing. International Journal of Wellbeing, 2, 222-235.

    Kahn, E. B., Ramsey, L. T., Brownson, R. C., Heath, G. W., Howze, E. H., Powell, K. E., & Corso, P. (2002). The effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity: A systematic review. American journal of preventive medicine, 22, (4), 73-107.

    Paterson, B.L., Thorne, S., Canam, C., Jilings, C., (2001). Meta-Study of Qualitative Health Research: A Practical Guide to Meta-Analysis and Meta-Synthesis. Sage, Thousand Oaks,CA.

    Södergren, M. (2013). Lifestyle predictors of healthy ageing in men. Maturitas, 75, 113-117.

    Corresponding author email: Lars.Kristen@hh.se

  • 45.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Future challenges for intervention research in health and lifestyle research: A systematic meta-literature review2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, 27326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this systematic meta-literature review was to (1) summarize the findings of review studies focusing on health determinants, (2) give an overview of intervention studies that have been used to facilitate health and lifestyle, and (3) provide recommendations for future studies in health promotion. A literature review, using a meta-method, was conducted to identify health and lifestyle research based on research articles related to health changes. The search yielded a total of 561 unique citations and finally 24 citations remained. Of those, 11 studies focused on health determinants, whereas 13 focused on interventions for health promotion. Results from this meta-synthesis led to four recommendations for the design of future intervention studies. (1) To increase the likelihood of capturing different biopsychosocial aspects of health, researchers from different scientific disciplines should collaborate in the design, implementation, and evaluation of the study. (2) It is recommended to use theoretical frameworks that focus on health determinants in longitudinal studies with a repeated measures design. (3) Studies should involve behavioral interventions. (4) Design face-to-face intervention studies where the participant can interact with other persons.

  • 46.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Göteborgs Universitet: Idrottshögskolan: Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnéuniversitetet: Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och socialt arbete.
    Benefits of sport activities for disabled children and youth. / Die Bedeutung des Sports fuer behinderte Kinder und Jugendliche2003In: Towards a society for all through adapted physical activity: Proceedings. Kongressbericht Wien 3-7 juli 2001 / [ed] Maria Dinold ... et.al., Wien: Institut für Sportwissenschaft , 2003, 394-398 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Describes a phenomenography-based study that attempted to show how children and adolescents with disabilities felt about the consequences of taking part in sports activities. Provides information about the sports program involved, informants, interviews, and results.

  • 47.
    Liljebjörn, Niklas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Mattsson, Mattsson
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Unga vuxnas upplevelse av mobilapplikationer som medel för att främja hälsan2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Idag har smartphones har vuxit fram till att bli nyckelkomponenter inom utbildning och underhållning, samtidigt som det är ett bra verktyg för att kommunicera med vänner och på så sätt främja den psykiska hälsan. Smartphones har också utvecklats så de kan användas som medel för att främja den fysiska hälsan hos individer.

    Syfte : Syftet var att beskriva hur unga vuxna (18-25 år) upplever hälsofrämjande

    mobilapplikationer som medel för att främja hälsan.

    Metod : För att besvara studiens syfte valdes en kvalitativ forskningsdesign med intervjuer. Informanterna bestod av åtta studenter från en Högskola i sydvästra Sverige. Informanterna fick besvara ett tiotal frågor utifrån en frågeguide. Datan samlades in genom snöbollsteknik och det färdiga resultatet framställdes i kategorier med tillhörande underkategorier.

    Resultat : Resultatet presenterades utifrån följande kategorier: Ökad motivation till  hälsofrämjande aktiviteter , Ointresse för teknik och media och Bristande kunskap och behov med tillhörande underkategorier; Inre motivation samt Yttre motivation. Ointresse och För komplicerat , och slutliget Kunskapskälla och Bristande behov. Informanterna uppgav att det fanns ett ointresse för mobilapplikationer som medel för att främja hälsan, istället fick de motivation och kunskap från sin sociala omgivning samt internet.

    Implikation : Genom att applicera användarnas åsikter om att förenkla innehållet samtidigt som vidare forskning sker, kan också användandet av mobilapplikationer som hälsofrämjande medel, öka om applikationsutvecklarna lyckas möta användarnas behov.

  • 48.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    From the Swedish dual career model to a national digital system of dual career support services2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, 241-241 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sport and educational systems in Sweden have a long history (since the 1970s) of cooperating on a high school level. Recently steps have been taken by the Swedish Sport Confederation to initiate cooperation in higher education (i.e., university level). Swedish research on athletes’ dual careers has mainly focused on the high school level (e.g., Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014; Uebel, 2006), with Fryklund (2012) as the only one who targeted the university level. Stambulova et al. (2014) presented the Swedish dual career model to set up an agenda for future dual career research in Sweden. The model aligns the stages in the Swedish educational system with related age markers and stages in athletic as well as vocational development illustrating possible dual career pathways and related transitions. Outlined by the Swedish dual career model a new project has been initiated.  Demands and challenges as well as the relevant needs in psychological support of Swedish university student-athletes are investigated through mixed-method qualitative and quantitative explorations. Based upon findings and in collaboration with researchers in health innovation and embedded intelligent systems a national digital system of dual career support services is going to be developed and tested. The digital service can be explained as an online national career assistance program including dual career education, networking and training from a preventive-supportive perspective. That is, helping university student-athletes to develop knowledge, competencies and skills to become more competent and (with time) autonomous in managing their own careers. In a broader sense, the system is seen as facilitating implementations of the Swedish dual career philosophies of “winning in the short-run”(i.e., obtaining an optimal dual career balance) and “winning in the long-run”, that is, proactively preparing student-athletes for athletic career termination (Stambulova et al., 2014). © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 49.
    Minniti, Antoinette
    et al.
    Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Life Skills for Junior Soccer Players2012In: 2nd Dubai International Symposium of Sport Psychology: Mental Training. Strategies and Methods: 19-20 September 2012, Dubai: Dubai Sports Council , 2012, 26-28 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Poczwardowski, Artur
    et al.
    University of Denver, Denver, USA.
    Haberl, Peter
    United States Olympic Committee (USOC), Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.
    Diehl, Robert
    Mental Health Partners, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    O'Neil, Adam
    Sport Concussion Institute, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    Transitions of Young Swedish Athletes and American Olympians to Elite Training Settings2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, 132-133 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 121
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