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  • 1.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    What is a healthy Nordic diet? Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    What is a healthy Nordic diet? Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, article id 18189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR).

    DESIGN: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53±8 years, BMI 26±3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks.

    RESULTS: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI.

    CONCLUSIONS: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

    © 2012 Viola Adamsson et al.

  • 3.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Lantmännen R and D, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, I.-B.
    Bollnäs Heart Clinic, Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Eskil
    Bollnäs Heart Clinic, Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Riserus, U.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolaemic subjects: a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET)2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on cardiovascular risk factors.

    Design and subjects:

    In a randomizedcontrolled trial (NORDIET) conducted in Sweden, 88 mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects were randomly assigned to an ad libitum ND or control diet (subjects' usual Western diet) for 6 weeks. Participants in the ND group were provided with all meals and foods. Primary outcome measurements were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure (BP) and insulin sensitivity (fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance). The ND was rich in high-fibre plant foods, fruits, berries, vegetables, whole grains, rapeseed oil, nuts, fish and low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars and saturated fats.

    Results:

    The ND contained 27%, 52%, 19% and 2% of energy from fat, carbohydrate, protein and alcohol, respectively. In total, 86 of 88 subjects randomly assigned to diet completed the study. Compared with controls, there was a decrease in plasma cholesterol (-16%, P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (-21%, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (-5%, P < 0.01), LDL/HDL (-14%, P < 0.01) and apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA1 (-1%, P < 0.05) in the ND group. The ND reduced insulin (-9%, P = 0.01) and systolic BP by -6.6 ± 13.2 mmHg (-5%, P < 0.05) compared with the control diet. Despite the ad libitum nature of the ND, body weight decreased after 6 weeks in the ND compared with the control group (-4%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for weight change, the significant differences between groups remained for blood lipids, but not for insulin sensitivity or BP. There were no significant differences in diastolic BP or triglyceride or glucose concentrations.

    Conclusions:

    A healthy ND improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure at clinically relevant levels in hypercholesterolaemic subjects. © 2010 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  • 4.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Reumark, Anna
    MSc Kostvetenskap Lantmännen Food R&D, Stockholm.
    Fredriksson, Ing-Britt
    SSK Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs.
    Hammarström, Eskil
    SSK Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Riserus, Ulf
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Effects of a Nordic diet on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in hypercholesterolemic subjects: a randomized controlled study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Apart from lipid-lowering drugs, dietary changes can also reduce plasma LDL-C concentrations. No studies have been conducted to investigate the clinical effects of a diet with traditional foods originating from the Nordic countries. Method: In a randomised, controlled parallel-group intervention study 88 mildly hypercholesterolemic men and women were randomized to either an ad libitum Nordic diet (ND) or a control diet (CD) for 6 weeks. All meals and foods were provided to the participants in the ND group. Primary outcome measure was LDL-cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure, plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. The ND was a high-fibre diet rich in plant foods (fruit, berries, vegetables, root vegetables, whole grain cereals and legumes), vegetable fats (rapeseed oil and nuts) and fatty fish, low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars, saturated fats and red meats. Result: 86 subjects completed the study. Distribution of carbohydrates, fat and protein (E%) in ND was 54, 27, 19, respectively. ND lowered plasma total cholesterol 0.98±0.75 mmol/l (-16%), LDL-C by 0.83±0.67 mmol/l (-21%), HDL-C 0.08±0.23 mmol/l (-5%), including reduced LDL/HDL ratio by -0.42±0.57 (-14%) (all p<0.01 versus controls). Insulin concentrations decreased by 0.51± 2.25 (-9%, p=0.01) and systolic blood pressure by 7±13 mmHg (-5%, P<0.01) compared to controls. Despite diets were eaten ad libitum, body weight decreased by 3.0 kg in the ND (P<0.001). No significant differences were found for diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides or plasma glucose. Conclusion: A Nordic diet improves blood lipid profile, and insulin sensitivity as well as lowering blood pressure to a clinically significant extent in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

  • 5.
    Afifi, Mustafa
    et al.
    Department of Non-Communicable Diseases Control, Ministry of Health (HQ), Muscat, Oman.
    von Bothmer, Margareta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Egyptian women's attitudes and beliefs about female genital cutting and its association with childhood maltreatment2007In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 270-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to establish Egyptian women's attitudes and beliefs about female genital cutting (FGC) or mutilation by applying a questionnaire module about violence to a subsample of 5249 married women from a total of 19 474 women who participated in the 2005 Egypt Demographic Health Survey. Women were interviewed to determine if they had been exposed to marital violence in the year prior to the survey, their attitudes and beliefs about FGC, and if they physically abused their children. The association of beliefs about FGC with maternal physical abuse was examined, adjusting for exposure to marital violence and other socio-demographic variables. Of the women surveyed 16.4% and 3.4% had been exposed to physical and sexual violence, respectively, during the year prior to the survey. Around 76% of the women surveyed intended to continue the FGC practice, and 69.8% had slapped or hit their children during the year prior to the survey. Holding positive beliefs about the practice of FGC or intending to continue it was associated with maternal physical abuse and this has significant implications for health and welfare workers in Egypt and for society in general.

  • 6.
    Ahlborg, Mikael
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Morgan, Antony
    Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Socioeconomic inequalities in health among Swedish adolescents - adding the subjective perspective2017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health predict future inequalities in adult health. Subjective measures of socioeconomic status (SES) may contribute with an increased understanding of these inequalities. The aim of this study was to investigate socioeconomic health inequalities using both a subjective and an objective measure of SES among Swedish adolescents.

    Method

    Cross-sectional HBSC-data from 2002 to 2014 was used with a total sample of 23,088 adolescents aged 11–15 years. Three measures of self-rated health (dependent variables) were assessed: multiple health complaints, life satisfaction and health perception. SES was measured objectively by the Family Affluence Scale (FAS) and subjectively by “perceived family wealth” (independent variables). The trend for health inequalities was investigated descriptively with independent t-tests and the relationship between independent and dependent variables was investigated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Gender, age and survey year was considered as possible confounders.

    Results

    Subjective SES was more strongly related to health outcomes than the objective measure (FAS). Also, the relation between FAS and health was weakened and even reversed (for multiple health complaints) when subjective SES was tested simultaneously in regression models (FAS OR: 1.03, CI: 1.00;1.06 and subjective SES OR: 0.66, CI: 0.63;0.68).

    Conclusions

    The level of socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health varied depending on which measure that was used to define SES. When focusing on adolescents, the subjective appraisals of SES is important to consider because they seem to provide a stronger tool for identifying inequalities in health for this group. This finding is important for policy makers to consider given the persistence of health inequalities in Sweden and other high-income countries. ©  The Author(s). 2017

  • 7.
    Ahlborg, Tone
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dahlöf, Lars-Gösta
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Quality of the Intimate and Sexual Relationship in the First-Time Parents Six Months After Delivery2005In: Journal of Sex Research, ISSN 0022-4499, E-ISSN 1559-8519, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe the quality of the intimate relationship among parents six months after the birth of their first child. The Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) has been modified and used on 820 responding first-time parents, of which 768 were couples. The results reveal that most parents were happy in their relationship, but both mothers and fathers were discontented with the dyadic sexuality. "Being too tired for sexual activity" was a problem, especially for the mothers, and the most common frequency of intercourse was once or twice per month. The result does not support the assumption that the couples compensate the lacking sexuality with sensuality. Good communication within the couple was associated with higher levels of several dimensions of the intimate relationship, especially dyadic consensus and satisfaction. Thus, one way to stabilize and strengthen a relationship when dyadic sexual activity is low would be to emphasize dyadic communication and sensual activity.

  • 8.
    Ahlborg, Tone
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health.
    Persson, Lars-Olof
    University of Göteborg.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Assessing the Quality of the Dyadic Relationship in First-Time Parents: Development of a New Instrument2005In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 19-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research was to psychometrically evaluate the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), modified for use with new, first-time parents by extending the items of communication, sensuality, and sexuality. A total of 820 Swedish respondents, 6 months after the birth of their first child, participated in the study. Psychometric evaluation was conducted with factor analysis. The obtained factor structure was tested with multitrait analysis program. Thirty-three itemswere found to fit into a five-factor solution, explaining 50% of the total variance. Descriptive data revealed thatmost new parentswere satisfied with their intimate relationship in general, but dissatisfied with their sexual lives. Themodified DAS, now called the Quality of Dyadic Relationship Instrument includes 33 items and seems to be a useful, updated measurement for assessing quality of the intimate relationship in new first-time parents.

  • 9.
    Ahlbäck, Annie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Kvarnsäter, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    En av 36,7 miljoner: Att få en HIV diagnos2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although HIV is a well-known disease and millions of people worldwide are affected, it is still one of the world's most stigmatized diseases. Stigmatization causes the disease to be associated with both prejudice and shame, affecting the people who suffer from the disease annually. The purpose of this qualitative literature study was to highlight patients' experiences of getting an HIV diagnosis. The results of the literature study were based on nine scientific articles that resulted in the following six themes: Experiences of shock, experiences of anger and guilt, experiences in fear of dying, experiences of difficulty whit disclosure to friends and family, experiences of acceptance, and experiences of the diagnosis as a positive turning point. In the results, it was clear that the diagnosis raised many strong emotions and that the people who are affected are in urgent need of assistance and support from healthcare professionals to handle the diagnosis. Hence, it is important that nurses get an insight into the experiences regarding an HIV diagnosis and receive more education in the subject so that the right information can be given.

  • 10.
    Ahlstav Mårtensson, Ulrica
    et al.
    Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Erling-Hasselqvist, Nann
    Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Boström, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Differences in pain and nausea in children operated on by Tonsillectomy or Tonsillotomy – a prospective follow-up study2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 782-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the differences in postoperative pain, nausea and time of discharge in children 3–12 years old after Tonsillectomy or Tonsillotomy at the postanaesthetic care unit, children’s ward and at home. 

    Background: Tonsillectomy involves risk of bleeding, severe postoperative pain and nausea. Tonsillotomy is a less invasive method with lower risk of bleeding, postoperative pain and nausea according to previous studies.

    Design: A prospective, comparative follow-up study design.

    Method: From December 2008–April 2009 following parental agreement, 87 children in the ages 3–12 undergoing Tonsillectomy or Tonsillotomy participated. Visual analogue scale was used for children’s pain and nausea reports.

    Result: Significantly, fewer children operated on by the Tonsillotomy reported postoperative pain ‡ 3 according to the visual analogue scale than children operated on by the Tonsillectomy at the postanaesthetic care unit and the children’s ward. A statistically significant difference of postoperative nausea was only present during the care at the postanaesthetic care unit and children’s ward with fewer Tonsillotomy children reporting nausea ‡ 3. The time of postoperative care was shorter among the Tonsillotomy children in both the postanaesthetic care unit and the children’s ward. Postoperative pain and pain related difficulties in eating after discharge was significantly more present among the Tonsillectomy children compared with the Tonsillotomy children.

    Conclusion: The results of our study showed duration of postoperative pain and nausea in both groups, but indicated that Tonsillotomy is a more favourable alternative than Tonsillectomy in children. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 11.
    Ahmadi, Nasser S.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Breathlessness in everyday life from a patient perspective: A qualitative study using diaries2014In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Breathlessness is a subjective symptom, which makes it difficult to define and understand. The aim of the present study was to illuminate how patients suffering from breathlessness experience their everyday life. Method: The study was a qualitative study, and the focus of the analysis was the patients' descriptions of their experiences of breathlessness using a diary with two unstructured questions for a period of 7 consecutive days. Sixteen participants: 7 men, mean age 65 ± 7 (range 55-73 years old), and 9 women, mean age 65 ± 9 (range 50-72 years old) participated in the study. Results: Two themes emerged from the analysis: 1) Impaired quality of life and 2) symptom tolerance and adaptation. The theme "impaired quality of life" included the categories limited physical ability, psychological burdens, and social life barriers. The theme "symptom tolerance and adaptation" included importance of health care, social support, hobbies and leisure activities, and coping strategies. Significance of results: The findings in our study showed that patients, in spite of considerable difficulties with shortness of breath, found relief in several types of activities, in addition to drug therapy. The result indicates that the "biopsychosocial model" is an appealing approach that should be discussed further to gain a better understanding of breathlessness. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013.

  • 12.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden & FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, p. 87-87, article id OP0072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If localised pain represent one end of a pain spectra, with overall better general health, chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia represent the other end of the spectra with worse general health and more comorbidities with other somatic diseases and mental illness. Sleep problems and fatigue are common among individuals reporting CWP and previous research indicate that sleep problems may be an important predictor for pain prognosis.

    Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate if sleep problems and fatigue predict the onset of CWP 5 and 18 years later.

    Methods: In order to get more stable baseline classifications of CWP, a wash-out period was used, including only individuals who had not reported CWP (according to ACR 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia) at baseline (−98) and three years prior baseline (−95). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5 year follow-up (−03) and 791 entered for the 18 year follow-up (−16). Four parameters related to sleep (difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and non-restorative sleep), and one parameter related to fatigue (SF-36 vitality scale) were investigated as predictors for CWP. Binary logistic regression analysis were used for analyses.

    Results: All investigated parameters predicted the onset of CWP five years later (problems with initiating sleep (OR 1.91; 1.16–3.14), maintaining sleep (OR 1.85; 1.14–3.01), early awakening (OR 2.0; 1.37–3.75), non-restorative sleep (OR 2.27; 1.37–3.75) and fatigue (OR 3.70; 1.76–7.84)) in a model adjusted for age, gender, socio-economy and mental health. All parameters except problems with early awakening predicted the onset of CWP also 18 years later. In all, 785 individuals did not report any of the sleeping problems at baseline (fatigue not included), 268 reported one of the problems, 167 two, 128 three and 117 subjects reported to have all four sleep problems. Reporting all four sleep problems was significantly associated with CWP at follow-up at both time points when adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and mental health (OR 4.00; 2.03–7.91 and OR 3.95; 1.90–8.20); adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and number of pain regions (OR 2.94; 1.48–5.82 and OR 2.65; 1.24–5.64) and in a model adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and pain severity (OR 2.97;1.53–5.76; and OR 3.02;1.47–6.21) for the 5 year and 18 year follow-up respectively, compared to not reporting any of the sleep problems at baseline.

    Conclusions: Both sleeping problems and fatigue predicts the onset of CWP 5- and 18 years later. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality in the clinic.

  • 13.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden & University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Syddansk Universitet, Graasten, Danmark.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that sleep problems may be an important predictor for chronic widespread pain (CWP). With this study we investigated both sleep problems and fatigue as predictors for the onset of CWP over a 5-year and an 18-year perspective in a population free from CWP at baseline.

    Methods: To get a more stable classification of CWP, we used a wash-out period, including only individuals who had not reported CWP at baseline (1998) and three years prior baseline (1995). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5-year follow-up and 791 entered for the 18-year follow-up. Difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue were investigated as predictors separately and simultaneously in binary logistic regression analyses.

    Results: The results showed that problems with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early awakening and non-restorative sleep predicted the onset of CWP over a 5-year (OR 1.85 to OR 2.27) and 18-year (OR 1.54 to OR 2.25) perspective irrespective of mental health (assessed by SF-36) at baseline. Also fatigue predicted the onset of CWP over the two-time perspectives (OR 3.70 and OR 2.36 respectively) when adjusting for mental health. Overall the effect of the sleep problems and fatigue on new onset CWP (over a 5-year perspective) was somewhat attenuated when adjusting for pain at baseline but remained significant for problems with early awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue. Problems with maintaining sleep predicted CWP 18 years later irrespective of mental health and number of pain regions (OR 1.72). Reporting simultaneous problems with all four aspects of sleep was associated with the onset of CWP over a five-year and 18-yearperspective, irrespective of age, gender, socio economy, mental health and pain at baseline. Sleep problems and fatigue predicted the onset of CWP five years later irrespective of each other.

    Conclusion: Sleep problems and fatigue were both important predictors for the onset of CWP over a five-year perspective. Sleep problems was a stronger predictor in a longer time-perspective. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality and fatigue in the clinic. © The Author(s). 2018

  • 14.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Women’s experiences of coping with chronic widespread pain: – a qualitative study2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, p. 1815-1815, article id FRI10737-HPRArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Approximately ten percent of the population report chronic widespread pain (CWP), the condition is more common among women than men. For most people, the pain interferes with many aspects of every-day life and implies large consequences. However, the group reporting CWP is heterogeneous and there is a need for better understanding of the different strategies used for coping with pain in every-day life.

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe women’s experiences of how to cope with CWP.

    Methods: The study had a descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Individual interviews were conducted with 19 women, 31–66 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016. CWP was defined according to the 1990 ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. To be considered chronic, the pain should have persisted for more than three months during the last 12 months. A manifest qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the main question “How do you cope with your chronic widespread pain?” The analysis resulted in four categories.

    Results: Women described their coping with CWP in four different ways; to take control, to continue as usual, to follow instructions and to rest. To take control meant to make deliberate decisions to handle everyday day life. It also meant to take care of oneself, to think positive and to exercise at an adequate level. To continue as usual meant not to listen to body signals and either to ignore or accept the pain. To follow instructions meant listening to the health professionals and following advices, but without taking any part of the responsibility for the treatment outcome. To rest meant to perceive an unreasonable need for recovery, to resign and let the pain set the terms for the daily living.

    Conclusions: Women expressed different ways of coping with CWP including both active and passive strategies. The coping strategies included two dimensions, where one ranged from actively taking control over the pain, to passively following instructions and the other from actively continue as usual by either accepting or ignoring the pain to passively rest and being mastered by pain.

  • 15.
    Akerö, Emma
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Zetterström, Linda
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Inblick i en annan livsvärld: Att belysa omvårdnadsåtgärder vid positiva symtom hos patienter med schizofreni.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease including positive symptoms, such as for example delusions and auditory hallucinations. This group of patients can be difficult for nurses to reach. The condition entails patient exclusion and stigmatization, also an increased risk of suicide. People with schizophrenia have shown insufficient compliance in drug treatment, which in turn can negatively affect care. Previous research shows a need for increased knowledge to achieve better efficacy in the treatment of these patients. Therefore, the specific aim of this study is to illustrate the care activities in case of positive symptoms in schizophrenia. Four databases were searched and the searches resulted in 18 articles. The results showed that individualized care, based on the patient's life-world, is essential to reach the patient and thus to identify the most beneficial care activities. Patients with positive symptoms need support from nurses to find strategies to cope with these. With the support of this study, nurses can support patients to find these coping strategies. Behavior that is commonly considered destructive is not necessarily negative, it can also be a coping strategy for patients with positive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  • 16.
    Alfermann, D.
    et al.
    Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). The P.F. Lesgaft State Academy, St Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Zemaityte, A.
    University of Vilnius, Vilnius, Lithuania & Department of Pyschology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.
    Reactions to sport career termination: A cross-national comparison of German, Lithuanian, and Russian athletes2004In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess the cognitive, emotional, and behavioural consequences of sport career termination of national and international level athletes in three nations.

    Design and methods: Athletes of Germany (n=88), Lithuania (n=65), and Russia (n=101) were asked to describe in retrospect their reactions to career termination. The Athletic Retirement Questionnaire developed by the first two authors and presented in three corresponding languages was used. Planning of retirement and national identity served as independent variables. Dependent variables were reasons and circumstances for career termination, participants’ emotional reactions, coping reactions, athletic identity during and after sport career, and adjustment to life after career termination.

    Results: Analyses of variance revealed significant main effects of retirement planning and national identity on most dependent variables. Planning of retirement contributed to significantly better cognitive, emotional, and behavioural adaptation. In addition, high athletic identity contributed to less positive reactions to retirement and to more problems in the adaptation process. The emotional reactions of Russian and Lithuanian athletes were similar, but differed from the German athletes who, in general, showed more positive and lesser negative emotions after retirement. Though accepting the reality of retirement was the most often used coping strategy among all participants, Lithuanian athletes showed more denial and Russian athletes more distraction strategies after retirement than the other nations.

    Discussion: The results are discussed with regard to athletes’ readiness for career transition in different social and cultural environments. Recommendations are given on how to help athletes to prepare for and to cope with career termination. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Tyskland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Career transitions and career termination2007In: Handbook of sport psychology / [ed] Gershon Tenenbaum and Robert C. Eklund, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2007, 3, p. 712-733Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to comprehensively overview this research area and expand the perspectives provided in the two earlier editions of this Handbook. In this chapter, we first define and explain the key concepts of athletic career, career transition, and career termination. In subsequent sections, we discuss the theoretical background, the empirical research, and intervention approaches as they are concerned with career transitions and termination. We close the chapter with suggestions for future research in the career transition area.

  • 18.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Sport psychology in Europe – Women’s perspective2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 55-55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to other disciplines of psychology, sport and exercise psychology is a very young field. Sport psychology associations were founded in a variety of countries (particularly in Europe and North America) in the 1960es and later, after the first World Congress of Sport Psychology had taken place in Rome in 1965. Despite the fact that even in those ages quite a few women were studying psychology and afterwards starting a scientific career, females in sport psychology were extremely underrepresented. One of the reasons could lie in the fact that sport, much more than psychology, was a stereotypically male field, with only a few opportunities available to women. Making a career in sport psychology was then a double contradiction for women. First, making a career in general contradicted the typical female role, and second, making a career in sport meant an untypical field for women.

    The presentation will be structured as a dialogue between the two presenters – female sport psychologists working in the field for more than 30 years. Both were born and started their careers during the period of the Cold War: Dorothee Alfermann in the Federal Republic of Germany, and Natalia Stambulova in the Soviet Union. Both countries do not exist on the European map any more reflecting dramatic political, social and economic changes in Europe during the last two decades. All the changes in the European context put their impacts on the development of sport and exercise psychology in Europe including overall organizational development, as well as female careers and their contributions to European Federation of Sport Psychology (FEPSAC), other international sport psychology organizations (e.g., ISSP, AASP) and international sport psychology events (e.g., Congresses). The dialogue will be structured around the following three themes: (a) the presenters’ own careers analyzed from the point of gender issues (e.g., female professional role models and mentors), (b) history of European sport and exercise psychology, foundation of FEPSAC and contribution of its first President Ema Geron (1969-1973), and (c) female sport psychology professionals’ role in today’s European sport psychology and their contributions to FEPSAC, ISSP, AASP, national sport psychology associations, the editorial board of Psychology of Sport and Exercise, the European Forum of Applied Sport Psychologists, the European Master’s Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMSSEP), and the recent European Master’s (Mundus) Program in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMPSEP).

  • 19.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Zemaityte, Aiste
    University of Vilnius, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Causes and consequences of career termination: A comparison of German, Russian and Lithuanian athletes2001In: International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) 10th World Congress of Sport Psychology: organized by Democritus University of Thrace, University of Thessaly, Hellenic Society of Sport Psychology : in the dawn of the new millennium : May 28-June 2, 2001, Skiathos, Hellas : programme and proceedings: vol. 4 / [ed] Athanasios Papaioannou, Marios Goudas, Yannis Theodorakis, Thessaloniki, Greece: Christodoulidi Publications , 2001, p. 26-28Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and Usage of Different Kind of Support among Young Informal Carers of Persons with Mental Illness2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of mental illness among young person’s means that their relatives and close friends are exposed to stress by having to take on the responsibility for the support of family members or friends in difficult situations of life when suffering from mental illness. Young informal carers have shown to be exposed to a great burden in which they put their own daily tasks aside in order to stay close to the person who suffers from mental illness. Objective: Explore how young (16–25) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use different kind of support, such as web-support, counseling, and group counseling, friends, family, relatives support societies, health care services etc. Method: In a mixed method approach, we first interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. Results: The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. The results also showed that the young informal carers’ safety net is their social network and the person who suffer from mental illness. Conclusion: Young informal carers are in need of a combination of web-based and face-to-face person-centered support, but they do not receive it. Professional support is required. Further studies about the needs of young informal carers of persons with mental illness especially those supporting friends, is necessary to gain before planning to start support interventions for them.

  • 21.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and Usage of Different Kind of Support among Young Informal Carers of Persons with Mental Illness2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of mental illness among young person’s means that their relatives and close friends are exposed to stress by having to take on the responsibility for the support of family members or friends in difficult situations of life when suffering from mental illness. Young informal carers have shown to be exposed to a great burden in which they put their own daily tasks aside in order to stay close to the person who suffers from mental illness. Objective: Explore how young (16–25) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use different kind of support, such as web-support, counseling, and group counseling, friends, family, relatives support societies, health care services etc. Method: In a mixed method approach, we first interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. Results: The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. The results also showed that the young informal carers’ safety net is their social network and the person who suffer from mental illness. Conclusion: Young informal carers are in need of a combination of web-based and face-to-face person-centered support, but they do not receive it. Professional support is required. Further studies about the needs of young informal carers of persons with mental illness especially those supporting friends, is necessary to gain before planning to start support interventions for them.

  • 22.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and usage of support among young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a mixed-method study2013In: Horatio, European Psychiatric Nursing Congress 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Neslihan Keser Özcan, Hülya Bilgin, 2013, p. 94-94Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Gothenburg University.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Support for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a mixed-method study2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 611-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how young (16-25 year old) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use support. In a mixed method approach, we interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. Young carers are greatly in need of support and it should be provided.

  • 24.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Effectiveness of web-based versus folder support interventions for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a randomized controlled trial2014In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 362-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Compare the impact of two interventions, a web-based support and a folder support, for young persons who care for people who suffer from mental illness. 

    Methods: This study was a randomized control trial, following the CONSORT statements, which compared the impact of two interventions. Primary outcome variable was stress, and secondary outcome variables were caring situation, general self-efficacy, well-being, health, and quality of life of young informal carers (N = 241). Data were collected in June 2010 to April 2011, with self-assessment questionnaires, comparing the two interventions and also to detect changes. 

    Results: The stress levels were high in both groups at baseline, but decreased in the folder group. The folder group had improvement in their caring situation (also different from the web group), general self-efficacy, well-being, and quality of life. The web group showed increase in well-being. 

    Conclusion: Young informal carers who take on the responsibility for people close to them; suffer consequences on their own health. They live in a life-situation characterized by high stress and low wellbeing. This signals a need for support. 

    Practice implications: The non-significant differences show that each intervention can be effective, and that it depends upon the individual's preferences. This highlights the importance of adopting person-centered approach, in which young persons can themselves choose support strategy. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Centre for Person-Centred Care Research (GPCC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Vårdal Institute – The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The impact of a person-centred web-based intervention on young informal carers of people with mental illness2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 4-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research show that young person’s often take responsibility and offer care and support for significant others who suffer from mental illness. This adoption of responsibility has consequences not only for the mentally ill, but also for the carer. A person-centred support approach to provide the young informal carers of what they are in need of is according to previous research essential, and in need of. As the internet becomes increasingly fundamental to young people in their daily lives, person-centred web-based interventions may be effective in supporting those caring for a person with mental illness.

    Objective: To analyze (according to stress, burden, quality of life, and self-efficacy) the impact of a person-centred web-based intervention (information, education, and support) for young persons who support family members or close friends with mental illness.

    Methods: The study design was prospective and randomized. The sample consisted of young informal carers (N = 241; 16–25 y), where N = 241 completed structured questionnaires at baseline and were allocated to person-centred web-based support (N = 121) respectively folder support (n =120) regarding available support in the society for young persons who support someone suffering from mental illness.

    Results: Data show that the stress levels were high in both groups at the start of the intervention, but decreased in the folder group, who also showed improvements in their caring situation (also different from the web-support group), general self-efficacy, well-being and their quality of life. The group who received person-centred web-based support showed significant increase in their well-being.

    Conclusion: It is of great importance to measure the stress and caring situation of young informal carers of persons with mental illness in order to understand their situation. One type of support could be person-centred web-based, however our results indicate that individuals seek support depending on their individual preferences. Since the responsibility of care has shifted from the health care services to the family and friends of the person suffering from a mental illness, more person- centred care/support interventions should be investigated for further development.

  • 26.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16–25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 27.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Att använda internet vid datainsamling2017In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod: från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Maria Henricson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 2, p. 217-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    eHälsa2017In: Vårdpedagogik / [ed] Margret Lepp & Janeth Leksell, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, p. 190-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Växjö University, School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Vaxjo Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Primary Health Care, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jogre, J.
    Växjö University, Centre for Acute and Critical Care (CACC), Vaxjo Sweden.
    Lyrström, L.
    Växjö University, Centre for Acute and Critical Care (CACC), Vaxjo Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences Jonkoping, School of Health Sciences, Jonkoping Sweden.
    Acute coronary syndrome: social support and coping ability on admittance2008In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare social support and coping ability in acute coronary syndrome patients at the time of the cardiac event with a healthy community-based sample, with regard to age, sex, education and marital status.

    Method: The study comprised 241 patients and 316 healthy controls. The participants answered a self-administered questionnaire that included three well-established scales. Multiple logistic regression was used in the analysis to compare the health situation between the patients and controls.

    Results: Persons suffering from acute coronary syndrome rated emotional support significantly lower than the healthy controls. However, there were no differences between the two groups in terms of socio-demographic variables.

    Conclusion: This study indicates that social support may be a predictor of acute coronary syndrome.

  • 30.
    Almqvist-Tangen, Gerd
    et al.
    Child Healthcare Team, Region Halland, Sweden & Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Alm, Bernt
    Child Healthcare Team, Region Halland, Sweden & Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Research and Development Centre Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Roswall, Josefine
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & County Hospital, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nevonen, Lauri
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden & Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What makes parents act and react? Parental views and considerations relating to ‘child health’ during infancy2017In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 415-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle factors and behaviours are adopted very early in life and tend to persist throughout life. Considering that the parents are the primary gatekeepers for their child’s health, there is a need to gain more knowledge and deeper understanding about what causes parents to act and react in order for early preventive efforts to have any effect. The aim was to explore the parental views and considerations concerning ‘child health’ among parents with infants 8–10 months old. The sample was strategic and 16 parents (aged 23–41) were recruited from three child health centres in Sweden. Open-ended interviews were conducted and a qualitative, manifest content analysis approach was utilized. The parents described the subject ‘child health’ as a large, multifaceted concept. Three categories emerged during data analysis: developing a sixth sense, being affected by perceptions and believing health and ill health as a continuum. The parents perceived food and feeding issues as one of the most worrying aspects and a significant indicator of ‘child health’. In order to meet the parents on their turf, the ‘healthy health message’ conveyed needs to take the parental perspective into consideration rather than attempting to educate the parents from predetermined assumption, belief and values. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 31.
    Almqvist-Tangen, Gerd
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Considerations of the concept of infant health: a literature review2006In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 176, no 6, p. 575-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined a wide range of literature in order to describe factors associated with the concept of infant health. The design of the study is a literature review examining 21 research studies, written in the English language. The study explored which factors were found to exert an influence on the concept of infant health. The result showed that the concept infant health is dependent on many factors but what seems to exert an influence are foremost maternal health and well-being, the family's health care utilization and the parental assessment of their own health. Additional studies are needed to fully understand the concept of infant health. The need for an infant definition that empowers infant health arises because, if a common ground is not clearly established, miscommunication may arise. Furthermore, there is a need to initiate a model for infant health.

  • 32.
    Alvarsson, Evelina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lorentzson, Moa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Mobbning på arbetsplatsen: En litteraturstudie om mobbningens konsekvenser ur ett folkhälsoperspektiv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Eftersom det inte finns någon riktig benämning på vad vuxenmobbning innefattar är detta område inte särskilt belyst. Det som på senare år tagits fram är att mobbing som förekommer på arbetsplatsen är orsaken till många sjukskrivningar. 

    Syftet: Syftet med studien var att beskriva hälsokonsekvenserna av mobbning på arbetsplatsen.     

    Metod: Studien genomfördes som en litteraturstudie där 15 vetenskapliga artiklar utgjorde grunden. Artiklarna granskades och därefter skapades två teman. 

    Resultat: De psykiska hälsoeffekterna av mobbning kan vara kort- och långsiktiga. De psykiska hälsoproblemen som ångest och depression kan övergå till fysiska åkommor så som sömnproblem, muskelsmärta och infektioner. 

    Implikation: Kunskap om mobbning kan användas till att utveckla trygga arbetsmiljöer för att motverka mobbning. 

  • 33.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Working with an anxious and psychologically abused athlete: A mindful, neuropsychotherapy approach2014In: Neuropsychotherapy: Theoretical concepts and clinical applications / [ed] Rossouw, Pieter J., Brisbane: Mediros , 2014, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Hanrahan, Stephanie J.University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Doing exercise psychology2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    A methodology of loving kindness: how interpersonal neurobiology, compassion, and transference can inform researcher–participant encounters and storytelling2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns some central aspects of methodology in qualitative research: the participants’ and investigators’ storytelling, and the main instruments in many interview-based qualitative studies, the researchers themselves. We discuss several ethical and interpersonal aspects of qualitative research encounters between investigators and their interviewee participants. Interviewing research participants is a fundamentally exploitative process, and we make suggestions for how we can temper that exploitation by giving something of value back to our participants and to make sure the well-being of the participant is not compromised by our actions. Many research topics in qualitative studies concern experiences of stress, distress and trauma, and interviewees re-telling their stories may become retraumatised. Such retraumatisation constitutes abuse on the part of the researcher. To counter potential abuse and exploitation, we discuss how researchers, as the central instruments in interview-based investigations, can use knowledge of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic theory and mindful practice to enable them to hold their participants (and their participants’ stories) in loving care and maybe even help in healing processes. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 36.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Barney, Steve T.
    South Utah University, Cedar City, Utah, USA.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, Cambridge, Waikato, New Zealand.
    Mindfully Dynamic Meta-Supervision: The Case of AW and M2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 330-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Andersen, Mark
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, North Dunedin, New Zealand.
    A brief impressionistic history of paying attention: The roots of mindfulness2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 5-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Andersson, Gunvor
    et al.
    Socialhögskolan, Lunds universitet.
    Linge, Else Charlotte "Lotta"
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tioåringars kompetens och levnadsförhållanden1998Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Luthra, Renee
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Hurtig, Peter
    Research and Development, Misa AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Employer attitudes toward hiring persons with disabilities: A vignette study in Sweden2015In: Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, ISSN 1052-2263, E-ISSN 1878-6316, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with disabilities are often far removed from the labour market and research shows that employers’ negative attitudes toward persons with disabilities create a barrier to attaining employment. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate Swedish employers’ experiences and attitudes toward hiring persons with various disabilities. METHODS: A vignette method with accompanying questions was used. A total of 212 employers, who were actively seeking to hire, were recruited via an online employment site and participated in the study. RESULTS: The results indicated that there is some interest for employers to hire persons with disabilities and that this depended on the type of disability a person has. Other results demonstrated that previous experience of employing persons with disabilities was linked to greater interest in hiring, that employers had greater interest to hire than they thought other employers had, and that openness about the disability was deemed as an important factor in the hiring process. CONCLUSION: The novelty of this study is its use of a vignette design to investigate employers’ attitudes in Sweden. Moreover, the results are much in line with international research. This contributes to knowledge and development of increasing employment for persons with disabilities. © 2015 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Twum-Antwi, Akwasi
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
    Nyman, Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    van Rooyen, Dalena
    Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    Prevalence and socioeconomic characteristics of alcohol disorders among men and women in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa2018In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 26, no 1, p. e143-e153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing concern about alcohol problems in low- and middle-income countries. More research is required, particularly among the younger generation. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alcohol disorders and associated socioeconomic characteristics among young men and women living in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. This was a cross-sectional population-based study of 977 participants (52% male and 48% female) aged 18–40, the majority of whom lived in low-income areas. Data collection was carried out in 2012 by trained fieldworkers. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (DSM-IV) was used to investigate the prevalence of alcohol dependence (increased tolerance to alcohol, failed attempt to cut down, risk of physical and mental effects) and alcohol abuse (harmful use, consistent intoxication, risk behaviour, physically hazardous, social problems). A high 12-month prevalence of alcohol dependence was found (26.5% in total; 39.0% among men and 19.1% among women) as well as of alcohol abuse (9% in total; 19.0% among men and 6.0% among women). Few socioeconomic differences emerged among the men, except older men (OR 1.94, CI 1.11–3.42) and those supported by social grants (OR 2.28, CI 1.06–4.93), who presented higher odd ratios for alcohol dependence than the reference groups. Among the women, more differences emerged: women who were widowed/single (OR 2.35, CI 1.20–4.62), had no education (OR 3.41, CI 1.04–11.21), had a low income (OR 3.26, CI 1.55–6.80) and had no social support from friends when ill presented higher odd ratios (OR 1.73, CI 1.07–2.80). In the adjusted model, marital status and low income remained statistically significant. With regard to alcohol abuse, fewer socioeconomic differences emerged. Interventions need to address the early onset of alcohol misuse in order to meet both current needs and long-standing mental and physical illness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 41.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Conspiracy theories and critical thinking2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Interventionist Aesthetics: Critical Interventions in Television and the Idea of Subversion through Disruption2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a discussion about the prospects and theoretical challenges that interventionist aesthetics have to face in the contemporary media culture. By “interventionist aesthetics” I mean a cultural form that builds on the idea of subversion through disruption. The aim is to reach a more informed understanding of what makes interventions an attractive and widely spread form of expression in contemporary culture. With artistic interventions in the TV medium as its empirical example, the paper argues that interventionist aesthetics often build on more or less spontaneous theories of the media, and in order to understand the critical potential and attraction of contemporary interventions, there are reasons for considering an update of its media theory.

  • 43.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    No Digital “Castles in the Air”: Online Non-Participation and the Radical Left2016In: Media and Communication, ISSN 2083-5701, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents results from a study of online presence in activist milieus associated with the radical left in Sweden discussed from a perspective of non-participation. With the aim to further the understanding of digital non-participation as communicative strategy in activism, it builds upon empirical findings and argues that the online practices and use of social media, as could be observed in milieus associated with the radical left, indicates active non-participation and that this, in turn, is related to the ambition to claim autonomy. The article draws from existing scholarship on critical perspectives on protest movements and social media as well as empirical examples of online content published by radical leftist groups. Furthermore, it analyses how these activities could be understood in terms of active and passive non-participation, abstention or adaptation to social media affordances, as well as implosion of the social in digital media. The findings suggest that much of the activities in the material could be described as active non-participation and that this media practice relates to ideological positioning and values in the milieu. © 2016 by the author

  • 44.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Understanding and analysing online conspiracy theories and communities2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    What’s left of the radical left online?: Absence of communication, political vision, and community in autonomist web milieus in Sweden2018In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 384-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents and discusses results from a study of radical left-wing activism online carried out by the Swedish Media Council, a report that suggested that the Internet (i.e. the web, web 2.0, and social media) is not a prioritized arena for propaganda and recruitment for the radical left in Sweden. The purpose of this article is to re-evaluate some of these findings and add to the discussion on online activity and connectivity in political communication online, as well as to problematize simplified notions of radicalization and recruitment to pro-violent groups. Based on a hermeneutic inquiry regarding modes of communication, representations of political visions, and community, the article shows how the sites and groups studied favor one-way communication before interactivity, that political visions are limited to short-term goals in the immediate future, and that they give very little information about their activist activities to recruit supporters. © The Author(s) 2016

  • 46.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Where Technology Goes to Die: Representation of Electronic Waste in Global Television News2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of television news stories, aired on global networks, which have been reporting on the problems with electronic waste (e-waste). The main objective is to present a perspective on how a “low-frequency” emergency (i.e. a lengthy and ongoing state of environmental emergency) is presented as a news-worthy issue. Drawing on literature on televised “distant suffering”, the paper engages in a multi-modal text-analysis that addresses three questions:  By what techniques is the e-waste-problem presented as an urgent issue? How is the issue addressed? What relations between the spectator and the problem on display are established through the representation? The findings shows how on-location reports from e-waste dumping sites make use of sublime imagery in the visual representations; how e-waste dumping sites are presented as strange spaces, with no clear and comprehensible history; and finally, that the representations suggests an ambivalence and uncertainty when it comes to agency (who’s responsible, what can be done?). It could be argued that these modes of representation favor a (passive) “aesthetic contemplation” of the waste, rather than possibilities for action and relief.

  • 47.
    Andersson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Where Technology Goes to Die: Representations of ElectronicWaste in Global Television News2017In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 263-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes how electronic waste (e-waste) gets represented in television news stories. The main objective is to present a perspective on how a “low-frequency” emergency (i.e. a lengthy and ongoing state of environmental emergency) is presented as a newsworthy issue. Drawing on literature on televised “distant suffering,” the article engages in a multimodal text analysis of four newsstories about e-waste. The findings show how on-location reports from e-waste dumping sites make use of sublime imagery in the visual representations; how e-waste dumping sites are presented as strange spaces, with no clear and comprehensible history; and finally, that the representations suggest an ambivalence and uncertainty when it comes to agency (who is responsible and what can be done?). The article ends with a discussion of the implications of this mode of representation and its effectiveness in eliciting an appropriate response to the harms caused by e-waste. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 48.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Intervention and participation: A study of children’s involvement in the design of media literacy interventions2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a review of articles about media literacy interventions, with the purpose to discuss the value of child participation in the design of such interventions. The findings indicate that while numerous studies present evaluations of media literacy interventions, it is rare that the design processes behind these interventions are described. The most popular form of media literacy intervention is a school curriculum aimed towards tweens and teens. We argue for a closer attention to the ways in which media literacy interventions are designed in order for us to better understand when child participation can be beneficial.

  • 49.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    The kids will have their say?: Child participation in media literacy interventions2017In: NordMedia 2017 – Abstracts: Division 5, Media Literacy and Media Education, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the findings from a scoping review of articles about media literacy interventions, with the purpose to discuss the value of having children to participate in the design of media literacy interventions.

    The findings indicate that while numerous studies present evaluations of media literacy interventions, it is rare that the design processes behind these interventions are thoroughly described. Furthermore, the review shows that even though child participation in the implementation of interventions is put forth as important by several studies, it is rare that participation in the design stage is discussed. Finally, the findings show that child participation in the design of media literacy interventions is not considered as a factor for successful media literacy interventions.

    The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of these findings for further research on child participation in media literacy interventions. It is argued that we need to pay closer attention to the ways in which media literacy interventions are designed in order for us to better understand what makes them succeed or fail. More specifically, the role of child participation in this respect – not only in terms of listening to their various media-related questions and needs, but also in the sense of actual co-design – must be further examined.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Voice, Decision, Responsibility: Child Participation in the Design of Media Literacy Interventions2018Conference paper (Refereed)
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