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  • 1.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Wennberg, Siri
    ENT Department, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir
    Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Why do some individuals with objectively verified hearing loss reject hearing aids?2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated, in new hearing aid candidates, whether or not the use of coping strategies and the life situation, in terms of activity limitation, participation restriction and psychological well-being, were associated with the outcome of audiological counselling, i.e. the patients’ acceptance or rejection of a hearing aid (HA). The study included 173 consecutive adult patients (104 men and 69 women) with a need for audiological rehabilitation including HA-fitting. Use of communication strategies (Communication Strategies Scale, CSS), experience of activity limitation and participation restriction (Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale, HDHS), and general psychological well-being (Psychological General Well-being scale, PGWB) were assessed by self-report inventories. The hospital records, reviewed 1.5years after the first consultation, showed that 39 patients (25 men and 14 women, 23%) had not accepted a hearing aid. In crude and adjusted logistic regression analyses a low report (high scores) of maladaptive behaviour in communication was associated with a three-times higher odds for rejecting a hearing aid, while a highly perceived activity limitation and participation restriction were related to lower odds for rejection. Patients who felt they had few problems with their hearing or overlooked or repressed their shortcomings, rejected HAs more often.

  • 2.
    Helvik, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Wennberg, Siri
    Department St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Geir W.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Coping ability and everyday life situations in relation to audiological rehabilitation2007In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between the reported use of coping strategies and experience of everyday life prior to audiological rehabilitation and the number of rehabilitation consultations needed, were studied in a group of adults. The study took place at St. Olav's University Hospital, Norway and included 132 adult patients (77 men and 55 women) with no previous audiological rehabilitation or experience with hearing aid (HA) use. Hearing impairment was assessed by pure tone audiometry, while use of communication specific coping strategies and daily life situations were obtained using self-report inventories. The latter concerned activity limitation, participation restriction, and psychological well-being. The patients' hospital records were reviewed approximately 18 months after their first consultation. In total, 41 patients (31%) needed no more than the required minimum number of three consultations to complete rehabilitation including HA fitting, while 91 patients needed more than this. Logistic regression was used to study coping and everyday life in relation to the need for three versus more consultations. Little experienced participation restriction was related to the need for only three consultations. Use of communication specific coping strategies, activity limitation, or psychological well-being was not associated with the number of consultations needed. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

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