hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Meesters, Jorit J.L.
    et al.
    1ERC Syd, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden & Department of Orthopaedics, Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands & Research and Development, Sophia Rehabilitation Center, The Hague, The Netherlands.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Primary Health Care Unit, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart Th
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Section of Orthopedics, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Prognostic factors for change in self-reported anxiety and depression in spondyloarthritis patients: data from the population-based SpAScania cohort from southern Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Anxiety and depression symptoms are more common in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) than in the general population. This study describes prognostic factors for change in self-reported anxiety and depression over 2 years in a well-defined SpA cohort.

    METHOD: In 2009, 3716 adult patients from the SpAScania cohort received a postal questionnaire to assess quality of life (QoL) and physical and mental functioning. A follow-up survey was performed in 2011. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale indicated 'no', 'possible', and 'probable' cases of anxiety and depression. Transitions between the three different categories were analysed and logistic regression analysis determined prognostic factors (patient-reported outcomes and characteristics) for improvement or deterioration.

    RESULTS: In total, 1629 SpA patients responded to both surveys (44%) (mean ± SD age 55.8 ± 13.1 years, disease duration 14.6 ± 11.7 years); 27% had ankylosing spondylitis, 55% psoriatic arthritis, and 18% undifferentiated SpA. The proportion of patients reporting possible/probable anxiety decreased from 31% to 25% over 2 years, while no changes in depression were seen. Factors associated with deterioration or improvement were largely the same for anxiety as for depression: fatigue, general health, QoL, level of functioning, disease activity, and self-efficacy. However, reporting chronic widespread pain (CWP) at baseline increased the risk of becoming depressed and decreased the probability of recovering from anxiety.

    CONCLUSION: Self-reported anxiety and depression is common and fairly stable over time in SpA patients. The association between mental health and CWP indicates that both comorbidities need to be acknowledged and treated in the clinic. © 2018 The Author(s).

  • 2.
    Simonsson, M.
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden & Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Hertig Knut Health Care Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, L. T.
    Unit of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Petersson, I. F.
    Spenshult's Hosp. for Rheum. D., Halmstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, B.
    Spenshult's Hosp. for Rheum. D., Halmstad, Sweden.
    The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 340-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Swedish general adult population. A questionnaire about chronic pain was mailed to a total of 3928 subjects who were chosen as a random sample of the population in two communities in the county of Halland. All persons answering affirmatively to questions intended to identify patients with RA were invited to a clinical examination. X-rays of hands and feet, and analyses of rheumatoid factor and C reactive protein were performed provided that the patients fulfilled two or more of the five clinical items of the 1987 ARA criteria. Furthermore, non-participants were searched for in a patient register and in medical records from the local rheumatology unit in an attempt to identify further cases. Using the modified 1987 ARA criteria for population studies the prevalence rate of RA was calculated to 0.51% (95%, CI = 0.31-0.79).

  • 3.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Gällivare Hospital, SE-98282 Gällivare, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, K.
    Department of Medicine/Rehabilitation, Kiruna Hospital, Sweden.
    Hagfors, Linda
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ankylosing spondylitis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 359-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids on disease variables and drug consumption in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

    METHODS: Twenty-four patients were randomized to either a low-dose (1.95 g omega-3/day) or a high-dose (4.55 g omega-3/day) supplement. Disease activity, functional impairment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and drug consumption were assessed during visits at baseline and at weeks 7, 14, and 21.

    RESULTS: Eighteen patients completed the study, nine patients from each group. The patients in the high-dose group exhibited a significant decrease in disease activity according to the Bath Ankylosing Disease Activity Index (BASDAI; p = 0.038), which was not seen in the low-dose group. Significant differences were not found on drug consumption or in functional capacity in either of the groups. No significant differences were found when comparing the results between the high- and low-dose groups.

    CONCLUSION: Omega-3 fatty acids in adequate doses may have the capacity to decrease the disease activity of AS. However, larger and better controlled studies are needed before any further conclusions can be made on the extent of this capacity.

  • 4.
    Söderlin, M. K.
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Petersson, I. F.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Svensson, B.
    Department of Rheumatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Smoking at onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its effect on disease activity and functional status: Experiences from BARFOT, a long-term observational study on early RA2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 249-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of smoking on disease outcome in a large cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    METHODS: Between 1996 and 2004, 1787 adult patients (disease duration ≤ 1 year) were included in the BARFOT early RA study in Sweden. Smoking status was recorded at inclusion in the study. Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), general health (GH) and pain visual analogue scales (VAS), and drug treatment were registered at inclusion and at follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response and remission criteria were applied at 3, 6, and 12 months.

    RESULTS: The proportion of patients who smoked at inclusion in the study fell from 29% in 1996 to 20% in 2004. There were no significant differences in disease activity at inclusion stratified according to smoking status. At 12 months of follow-up, 18% of current smokers at inclusion, 12% of previous smokers, and 11% of never smokers had high disease activity (DAS28 > 5.1, p = 0.005). Significantly fewer current smokers were in remission at 12 months (33%) compared to never smokers (36%) and previous smokers (42%) (p = 0.013). Current smoking at inclusion independently predicted poor EULAR response up to 12 months of follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: The present study gives some support to earlier data indicating that RA patients who smoke have a more active disease but further studies are needed to confirm this.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf