hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Maria L. E.
    et al.
    R & D Center, Spenshult Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Björn
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    R & D Center, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Chronic widespread pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the relation between pain and disease activity measures over the first 5 years2013In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 1977-1985Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of chronic widespread pain (ChWP), chronic regional pain (ChRP), and fibromyalgia in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed for 5 years after inclusion, and to study the effect of pain on measures of disease activity and function.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 1910 patients participating in the Better Anti-Rheumatic Pharmacotherapy study. The responders (73%) were divided into 3 groups according to the reported pain duration and distribution - patients having no chronic pain (NChP), ChWP, and ChRP. Outcome measures were the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and C-reactive protein (CRP).

    RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of respondents reported ChWP, 46% ChRP, and 20% NChP. Patients reporting ChWP were more often women and had more pain and tender joints at inclusion. From 6 months to 5 years of followup, mean DAS28, visual analog scale (VAS) pain, VAS global health, and HAQ were significantly higher in the ChWP group than in the other groups. However, all groups showed a similar pattern in swollen joint count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and CRP. From 12 months the ChWP group was treated with prednisolone to a greater extent than the ChRP group, and it had a rate of treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs similar to that of the ChRP group.

    CONCLUSION: ChWP is a common feature in RA, more associated with high values for variables related to pain such as the DAS28 and HAQ than to indicators of ongoing inflammation such as swollen joint count, ESR, and CRP. Patients with ChWP should be identified so that adequate treatment also of the noninflammatory pain may be instituted.

  • 2.
    Bergman, Stefan
    et al.
    Primary Care Centre Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Herrström, Per
    Högström, K.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Svensson, Björn
    Jacobsson, Lennart T.
    Chronic musculoskeletal pain, prevalence rates, and sociodemographic associations in a Swedish population study2001In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1369-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of chronic regional and widespread musculoskeletal pain in a sample of the general adult population and study the association to age, sex, socioeconomic class, immigration, and housing area.

    METHODS: A cross sectional survey with a postal questionnaire to 3928 inhabitants on the west coast of Sweden.

    RESULTS: The age and sex adjusted prevalence of chronic regional pain (CRP) was 23.9% and chronic widespread pain (CWP) 11.4% among 2425 subjects who responded to the complete questionnaire. Odds ratio (OR) for CWP showed a systematic increasing gradient with age and was highest in the age group 59-74 yrs (OR 6.36, 95% CI 3.85-10.50) vs age group 20-34 yrs. CWP was also associated with female sex (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.41-2.61), being an immigrant (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.22-2.77), living in a socially compromised housing area (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.48-6.27), and being an assistant nonmanual lower level employee (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.09-3.38) or manual worker (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.65-4.49) vs being an intermediate/higher nonmanual employee. OR for CRP showed a systematic increasing gradient with age and was highest in the age group 59-74 yrs (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.62-3.05) vs age group 20-34 yrs. CRP was also associated with being a manual worker (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.19-2.23) vs being an intermediate/higher nonmanual employee.

    CONCLUSION: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common in the general population. Sociodemographic variables were overall more frequently and strongly associated with CWP than with CRP, which indicates different pathophysiology in the development or preservation of pain in the 2 groups.

  • 3.
    Bergman, Stefan
    et al.
    Primary Care Centre Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Herrström, Per
    Jacobsson, Lennart T
    Petersson, Ingemar F
    Chronic widespread pain: a three year followup of pain distribution and risk factors2002In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 818-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the change of pain reports over time in 3 cohorts derived from the general population: (1) no chronic pain (NCP; n = 1156); (2) chronic regional pain (CRP; n = 502); and (3) chronic widespread pain (CWP; n = 242). To identify risk factors that predict the development or persistence of chronic widespread pain.

    METHODS: A 3-year followup from 1995 to 1998 with postal questionnaire to 2425 subjects of both sexes aged 20-74 years on the west coast of Sweden.

    RESULTS: At followup, a larger proportion of subjects with initial CRP compared to initial NCP reported CWP (16.4 and 2.2%, respectively; p < 0.001). The majority of subjects (56.9%) who primarily reported CWP remained in that group at followup, but 26.8% had changed status to CRP and 16.3% to NCP. The number of painful regions (7-12 vs 0 regions) reported at baseline was the strongest predictor for the development of CWP with an odds ratio (OR) of 12.13 (95% CI 4.47-32.88). The development of CWP was also predicted by higher age (OR = 3.13, 95% CI 1.47-6.69, age-group 59-74 years vs age-group 20-34 years), and a family history of chronic pain (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.14-3.07). A habit of drinking alcohol weekly (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.21-0.85) compared to the habit of never or seldom drinking alcohol was protective, as well as having personal social support (OR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.28-0.85). The persistence of CWP was predicted by the number of painful regions (13-18 vs 1-6 regions) at baseline (OR = 7.56, 95% CI 2.17-26.30), and being an immigrant (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.33-7.77).

    CONCLUSION: Although the overall prevalence of CWP was stable over a 3-year period there was a considerable variation on an individual basis. This variability in expressing CWP was moderately predicted by a combination of risk factors, the most important being the number of painful regions at baseline. Future research will need to show how useful the identified factors are in clinical practice and whether intervention aimed at changing these factors will improve pain outcome. 

  • 4.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nurse-led Care and Patients as Partners Are Essential Aspects of the Future of Rheumatology Care2017In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 720-722Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Strömbeck, Britta
    et al.
    Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Englund, Martin
    Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T H
    Department of Rheumatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kedza, Ljuba
    Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Kobelt, Gisela
    Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F
    Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Klinikgatan 22, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Cost of illness from the public payers' perspective in patients with ankylosing spondylitis in rheumatological care2010In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 2348-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incremental costs to public payers for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) of working age compared with reference subjects from the general population.

    METHODS: We investigated total costs for 3 years (2005-2007) in 116 outpatients under 66 years of age with AS attending rheumatological care in Malmö, Sweden. Mean (SD) age was 46 (11) years and mean (SD) disease duration was 24 (11) years. Two subjects per AS patient matched for age, sex, and residential area were selected from the Population Register to serve as a reference group. We retrieved data concerning sick leave, prescription drugs, and healthcare consumption from Swedish health-cost registers by the unique personal identification numbers.

    RESULTS: The mean total cost for the 3-year period 2005-2007 was US $37,095 (SD $30,091) for patients with AS, and $11,071 (SD $22,340) for the reference group. The mean indirect cost was $19,618 and $5905, respectively. Mean cost for healthcare was $8998 for the AS patients and $4187 for the reference subjects, and mean cost for drugs was $8479 and $979, respectively. The patients with AS treated with biological therapy constituted 80% of the total drug cost, but just 40% of the cost for disability pension.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with AS had 3-fold increase in costs compared to reference subjects from the general population, and the drug costs were almost 10 times as high. Production losses (indirect cost) represented more than half of total cost (53%).

  • 6.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kokkonen, Heidi
    Division of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Division of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Division of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Plasma phospholipid fatty acid content is related to disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis2012In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate fatty acid composition in the diet, plasma phospholipids, and adipose tissue in a cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and to determine their correlations to disease activity and blood lipids in a cross-sectional study. METHODS: Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire in 66 patients with AS. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma phospholipids and gluteal adipose tissue were measured using gas chromatography. Disease status was quantified using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and proinflammatory cytokines. RESULTS: Diet did not correlate with disease activity assessed by the BASDAI, but there were negative correlations between the dietary intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and ESR (rs = -0.27, p < 0.05). The plasma phospholipid content of arachidonic acid correlated significantly with the BASDAI score (rs = 0.39, p < 0.01). There were correlations between the intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and high-density lipoproteins and serum triglycerides (rs = 0.26 and rs = -0.25, respectively, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: There was a positive correlation between levels of arachidonic acid in plasma phospholipids and disease activity assessed by BASDAI in patients with AS. A Western diet does not appear to influence this correlation, but seems to affect blood lipids involved in atherogenic processes.

  • 7.
    Söderlin, Maria K.
    et al.
    R and D Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    R and D Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Absent "Window of Opportunity" in smokers with short disease duration. Data from BARFOT, a multicenter study of early rheumatoid arthritis2011In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 2160-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of disease duration and smoking on outcome in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    METHODS: Between 1996 and 2004, 1587 patients were included in the BARFOT early RA (disease duration ≤ 1 year) study in Sweden. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), rheumatoid factor (RF), and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) were recorded at study start and at 3, 6, and 12 months.

    RESULTS: In total, 180 RA patients (11%) had disease duration ≤ 12 weeks. These patients achieved good EULAR response significantly more often at 3 and 12 months than patients with a longer disease duration despite having more aggressive disease [EULAR good response was achieved by 35% and 35% at 3 and 12 months, respectively, among the patients with disease duration ≤ 12 weeks, by 35% and 41% of patients with disease duration of 13-24 weeks, and by 28% and 33% of patients with disease duration of 25-52 weeks (p = 0.02 for 3 months; p = 0.02 for 12 months)]. There was a significant correlation between improvement in Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS28), its individual variables, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and disease duration up to 12 months after study start. For smokers, no such trend was seen.

    CONCLUSION: Up to 12 months after inclusion in the study, there was a significant correlation between improvement in DAS28, its individual components, and HAQ and disease duration, with patients who had a shorter disease duration improving most. Smokers had poorer EULAR response and showed no improvement with regard to disease duration. The Journal of Rheumatology Copyright © 2011. All rights reserved.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf