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  • 1.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Hosp, Ctr Res & Dev, Oskarstrom.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-10401 Stockholm.
    Berglund, Anita
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-10401 Stockholm.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Petersson, Ingemar
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, S-22185 Lund.
    Patterns of background factors related to early RA patients conceptions of the cause of their disease2011In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify patterns of background factors related to the early RA patients' conceptions of the cause of the disease. Conceptions from a qualitative study formed the basis for the stratification of 785 patients from the Swedish EIRA study answering a question about their own thoughts about the cause to RA. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the associations between patients' conceptions and relevant background factors: sex, age, civil status, educational level, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) and smoking habits. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A conception of family-related strain was strongly associated with being young (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.78 for age 58-70 vs. 17-46), female (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25-0.60 for male vs. female) and having a high level of education (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.54-3.01 for university degree vs. no degree). A conception of being exposed to climate changes was associated with being male (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.24-3.22 for male vs. female), having a low level of education (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.58 for university degree vs. no degree) and positive Anti-CCP (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.87 for positive vs. negative Anti-CCP). Linking patients' conceptions of the cause of their RA to background factors potentially could create new opportunities for understanding the complexity of the aetiology in RA. Furthermore, this information is important and relevant in the care of patients with early RA.

  • 2.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine. Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T. H.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine. Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Löfvendahl, Sofia
    Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Smoking is associated with a worse self-reported health status in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from a Swedish population-based cohort2015In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 579-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to study possible associations between smoking habits and self-reported clinical features in a large population-based cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All subjects with PsA who had sought health care in the period 2003-2007 were identified using a regional health-care register. In 2009, all those identified who were 18 years of age or more (n = 2,003) were sent a questionnaire with questions on smoking, health-related quality of life [EuroQol five-dimension (EQ-5D)questionnaire], function [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)], pain, fatigue, and global health. We performed age- and sex-adjusted regression analysis to compare health status outcomes in never and ever smokers. Altogether, 1,185 subjects (59 %) returned the questionnaire. Mean age was 57 years (SD 13.5), and 58 % were women; 38 % were never smokers and 62 % were ever smokers. Mean age at disease onset was 38.2 years (SD 13.2) and 41.2 years (SD 13.6), respectively (p = 0.001). In age- and sex-adjusted data, ever smokers reported worse EQ-5D (p = 0.009); worse reports of global health (p = 0.01), pain (p = 0.01), and fatigue (p = 0.04); and a higher number of painful body regions (p = 0.04) compared to never smokers. In this population-based PsA cohort, patients who were ever smokers reported worse health status than never smokers. Besides being a possible result of a worse PsA in ever smokers, impaired health status could also be an effect of unstudied comorbidities. Further longitudinal studies are needed to gain a better understanding of cause and effect. However, smoking cessation should be recommended because of general health considerations as well as disease-specific issues.

  • 3.
    Meesters, Jorit J. L.
    et al.
    Epi-centre Skåne, Skåne University Hospital, Medicon village, Lund, Sweden & Department of Orthopaedics, Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Epi-centre Skåne, Skåne University Hospital, Medicon village, Lund, Sweden & Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult, Research and Development Center, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult, Research and Development Center, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T. H.
    Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult, Research and Development Center, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Sociodemographic and disease-related factors are associated with patient-reported anxiety and depression in spondyloarthritis patients in the Swedish SpAScania cohort2014In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1649-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety and depression are common among patients with rheumatic diseases. This study aims to explore which factors are associated with self-reported anxiety and depression in a well-defined cohort of spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients. In 2009, 3,711 patients from the SpAScania cohort were sent a postal questionnaire to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and physical and mental functioning. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale measured anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D), subscales 0-21, best-worst. HADS ≥8 indicates possible cases of anxiety or depression. One-way ANOVA (p < 0.05) tested for differences among the SpA subtypes in HADS scores. Linear regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and disease duration was used to test for associations between HADS and independent variables. In total, 2,167 (58 %) patients (52 % females, mean age 55.4 years) returned the questionnaire. In total, 683 (32 %) cases were classified as "possible anxiety" and 305 (14 %) as "possible depression" cases with mean (SD) HADS-A 5.9 (4.3) and HADS-D 4.4 (3.6). There were no differences among the SpA subtypes in HADS-A and HADS-D. HADS-A and HADS-D were associated with lower education, lower physical activity (HADS-D only), chronic pain problems, more fatigue, lower general health, lower HRQoL, lower level of functioning, higher disease activity, and lower self-efficacy. Associations with anxiety and/or depression appear multifactorial in patients with SpA including both personal and disease-related factors. Since these comorbidities are increased in SpA and treatable, they should be screened for in clinical practice, possibly with instruments like the HADS. © 2014, Clinical Rheumatology

  • 4.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with ankylosing spondylitis2013In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, e.g.atherogenic blood lipids, hypertension and lifestyle-related factors such as smoking, diet and physical inactivity, differ among patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in comparison to the general population. Eighty-eight patients diagnosed with AS were identified by analysis of the databases of a previous community intervention programme, the Västerbotten intervention programme. The patients were compared with 351 controls matched for age, sex and study period. These databases include the results of blood samples analysed for cholesterol, triglycerides and plasma glucose, as well as data on hypertension, height, weight, smoking and dietary habits and physical activity. No significant differences were found between patients and controls regarding hypertension, body mass index, physical activity, diet or smoking. Levels of serum triglycerides (p <0.01) and cholesterol (p <0.01) were significantly lower in the patient group. Among the patients, the level of triglycerides correlated inversely with the intake of total fat (r s=0.25, p <0.05), monounsaturated fats (r s= 0.29, p <0.05) and positively correlated to the intake of carbohydrates (r s=0.26, p <0.05). These associations were not apparent among the controls. In the cohort of AS patients studied, no differences were found regarding the modifiable risk factors for CVD compared with the general population. Hence, the increased presence of CVD in patients with AS may be caused by other factors such as differences in metabolism and medication such as NSAID or the chronic low-grade inflammation present in the disease. © 2013 Clinical Rheumatology. © 2013 Clinical Rheumatology.

  • 5.
    Sundström, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Diet, disease activity, and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with ankylosing spondylitis2011In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate, firstly, the relationship between diet and disease activity and, secondly, the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and their relationship to diet among patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using a cross-sectional design. One hundred sixty-five individuals diagnosed with AS were invited to complete a self-administered postal questionnaire regarding demographic data, diet, medication, and gastrointestinal symptoms in addition to two established disease assessment questionnaires, i.e., the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). No significant correlation between diet and disease activity was found. Overall, 27% of the patients reported aggravating gastrointestinal problems when consuming certain foodstuff(s). The 30% of patients who reported suffering from gastrointestinal pain had significantly greater disease activity and poorer functional status according to their BASDAI and BASFI scores (p < 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). Patients who reported gastrointestinal pain had a significantly higher consumption of vegetables (p < 0.01) and lower consumption of milk and soured milk (p = 0.04). No significant correlation was found between the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and gastrointestinal symptoms. In multiple regression models, BASDAI and the consumption of vegetables were independent and statistically significant predictors of gastrointestinal pain. To conclude, in a group of Swedish AS patients, no correlation between diet and disease activity could be detected. There were, however, correlations between diet and gastrointestinal pain. Gastrointestinal problems were also found to be prevalent in AS, independent of NSAID usage.

1 - 5 of 5
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