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  • 1.
    Jacobsson, Anna
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    Pihl-Lindgren, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    Malnutrition in patients suffering from chronic heart failure; the nurse's care2001In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 449-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic heart failure is associated with a bad prognosis with considerably shortened survival and repeated hospitalisations. Patients suffering from heart failure also have symptoms that can affect their food intake, for example, tiredness when strained, breathing difficulties and gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, loss of appetite and ascites. Pharmacological therapy can lead to a loss of appetite, which will make the intake of food inadequate to fill the required energy and nutritional needs. The nurse's interest in and knowledge of diet issues can improve these patients' nutritional status, The aim of this literature review was to describe the nurse's interventions regarding malnutrition in patients suffering from chronic heart failure. The literature search gave 13 articles, which were analysed, and sentences whose content was related to the aim were identified. Three areas of content appeared; drug treatment and consequences, gastrointestinal effects, and information and education. The results show that the nutritional status of these patients can be significantly improved by means of simple nursing interventions. Future research should focus on controlled experimental studies to evaluate differences in body weight, body mass index and quality of life between patients suffering from chronic heart failure, who are taking part in a fully enriched nutrition intervention, and patients suffering from chronic heart failure, who are eating their normal diet.

  • 2.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Strömberg, A.
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, U.
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital Linköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, J. E.
    Department of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov Jönköping S-551 85, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patients with heart failure in primary health care: effects of a nurse-led intervention on health-related quality of life and depression2005In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 393-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To determine the effects of a nurse-led intervention designed to improve self-management of patients with heart failure in a primary health care setting regarding health-related quality of life and depression.

    Methods:

    Patients at eight primary health care centres were screened by the Diagnosis Related Groups registry for the diagnosis of heart failure and eligibility for a cluster randomised study. A total of 153 patients were included (n = 78 in the intervention group, 54% males, mean age 79 years, 59% in New York Heart Association class III-IV). The intervention involved patient and family education about heart failure and self-management and monthly telephone follow-up during 12 months by a primary health care nurse.

    Results:

    The effects of the nurse-led intervention were limited. Significant differences were found in the physical dimension measured by the SF-36 health survey, and in depression measured by the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale. In comparison within groups at the 3 and 12-month follow-up, the intervention group significantly maintained their health-related quality of life measured by the SF-36 health survey, and their experience of depression measured by the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale to a greater extent than in the control group, especially among women.

    Conclusion:

    A nurse-led intervention directed toward patients with heart failure in a primary health care setting resulted in limited effects between the groups, although the physical and mental status were retained during 12 months of follow-up to a greater extent than in the control group.

  • 3.
    Pihl, Emma
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jacobsson, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Depression and health-related quality of life in elderly patients suffering from heart failure and their spouses: a comparative study2005In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 583-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Little is known about the factors that influence the health outcome of elderly patients suffering from heart failure or the health of their spouses. The aim of this comparative study was to determine if older patients suffering from heart failure and their spouses experience similar levels of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and depression. The aim was also to identify those factors that contribute to HRQOL and depression in patient-spouse pairs.

    Methods:

    Data were collected from 47 couples, using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) questionnaires.

    Results:

    Patients suffering from heart failure and their spouses differed significantly in their experience of the physical, but not the mental, health-related quality of life, with patients experiencing significantly worse physical functioning. Physical symptoms of heart failure seemed to dominate the experience of the patient and was positively related to mental health and inversely related to the New York Heart Association classification (NYHA class) and patients' depression. Depressive symptoms as reflected in SDS showed no significant difference between patients and spouses. Patients' depression was positively related to high NYHA class, while spouse depression was positively related with higher age of the patient.

    Conclusion:

    Physical symptoms seem to dominate the experience of heart failure.

  • 4.
    Strömberg, A.
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, J.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dahlström, U.
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nurse-led heart failure clinics in Sweden2001In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aim of this study was to describe the nurse-led heart failure care in Sweden.

    Methods:

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all 86 hospitals in Sweden treating heart failure patients. All hospitals completed the questionnaire, which contained 20 questions about heart failure nurses, patient education, heart failure clinics, co-operation with primary healthcare and care programmes.

    Results:

    Sixty-nine percent of all hospitals (n = 86) had nurses specialised in taking care of heart failure patients, in total 148 heart failure nurses. The nurses were involved in patient education and follow-up. There were nurse-led heart failure clinics in 66% of the hospitals. The clinics provided follow-up after hospitalisation, telephone counselling and drug titration. The majority of the heart failure nurses had been delegated the responsibility for making protocol-led changes in medications. Most clinics registered the number of annual visits to the clinic, and the largest clinic had up to 1000 visits, Approximately half of the hospitals had a special care plan for patients with heart failure and an organised co-operation with primary healthcare.

    Conclusion:

    The first nurse-led heart failure clinic started in Sweden in 1990 and since then the model has been spread to two-thirds of the Swedish hospitals. (C) 2001 European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved.

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