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  • 1.
    Behrns, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hartelius, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Aphasia and Computerised Writing Aid Supported Treatment2009In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1276-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Individuals with aphasia often experience difficulties in writing. Word processors with a spell checker and a grammar checker can compensate for some of the writing difficulties associated with aphasia.

    Aims:

    To determine if writing difficulties associated with aphasia may be reduced by the use of a computerised writing aid when training patients.

    Methods & Procedures:

    The writing aids used in this study were originally designed specifically for persons with developmental reading and writing difficulties and are based on statistics of frequent misspellings and phonotactic rules. Three participants with aphasia selected one of two offered writing aids. Written production during treatment and evaluation was recorded and analysed by keystroke logging. The study had a single-subject ABA design replicated across three participants. The baseline (A) was established by measuring four dependent variables. During a 9-week intervention phase (B) the dependent variables were measured once a week. A follow-up (A) was done 10 months after the training was finished. The dependent variables were: total number of words in a writing task; proportion of correctly written words; words per minute; proportion of successful edits. The results were analysed both visually and by statistical calculations.

    Outcomes & Results:

    All participants experienced a positive improvement in their writing ability. Results showed individual differences; after completed training the first participant made more successful edits, the second wrote more words, had a larger proportion of correctly written words, and made more successful edits. The third participant's results did not show any improvement that could be statistically supported.

    Conclusions:

    This study showed that the computerised training facilitated the generating process and made the revision process more efficient for the participants. The results are important in that they indicate possible ways of designing writing treatment. However, they also show the need for careful analyses when evaluating different treatment strategies and in discussing what improved writing ability may be.

  • 2.
    Saldert, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Backman, Ellen
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hartelius, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Conversation partner training with spouses of persons with aphasia: A pilot study using a protocol to trace relevant characteristics2013In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 271-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Conversation partner training can be effective in improving communication in aphasia. However, there is a need for further research about effects of specific training programmes as well as about the relevant characteristics of the conversation partners who are to be candidates for training.

    Aims: This pilot study explores the applicability of an adaptation of a conversation partner training programme. In addition, a protocol for assessment of variables relating to the person with aphasia and the conversation partner that may be involved in changes in conversational interaction is examined.

    Methods & Procedures: Three dyads with persons with aphasia and their spouses participated in this explorative study with a case-series design. The training outcome was monitored with measures of perceived functional communication and analysis of multiple video-recorded natural conversations obtained at baseline, post intervention, and at a 12-week follow-up. Repeated measures of comprehension, word fluency, and psychological well-being were obtained as well as descriptive measures of the executive function and a profiling of attitudes and behaviour in communication in the spouses.

    Outcomes & Results: All three persons with aphasia and two of the spouses reported a slight improvement in the measure of perceived functional communication. This perception of improvement was also reflected in blinded, independent assessments of ability to support communication in conversations for the two spouses who reported improvement. The profiling of the third spouse indicated problems in attitudes to communication and also in aspects of executive function, and may account for the lack of intervention effects seen in the third dyad.

    Conclusions: The results show that intervention with the adapted training programme may be effective. It might be argued that the outcome measures as well as other measures fulfil their purpose. The profiling of relevant traits in the conversation partner may be useful, although the prognostic validity of the instruments needs to be further evaluated. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 3.
    Taubner, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Hallén, Malin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Department of Swedish, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Still the same? – Self-identity dilemmas when living with post-stroke aphasia in a digitalised society2020In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 300-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-identity construction through “stories of self” is highly relevant for people with aphasia, not only because the onset entails a “biographical disruption” but also since their ability to keep their “stories of self” going is reduced. Three dilemmas (constancy/change, sameness/difference and agency/dependency) are known to be central to identity. In a digitalised society like Sweden, self-identity construction, including the navigation of these dilemmas, takes place both online and offline. Nevertheless, research combining aphasia, identity and online issues is scarce.

    Aim: This qualitative study aims, in terms identity dilemmas, to investigate self-identity construction in working-age persons living with post-stroke aphasia in a digitalised society (i.e. Sweden). Are the dilemmas relevant to the participants, and if so, how do they navigate them online and offline?

    Methods and Procedures: Nine individuals (three men and six women, aged 24–54 at onset) with mild or moderate post-stroke aphasia participated. The data comprises nine individual audio-recorded interviews and 1,581 screenshots from online observations. Qualitative analyses were performed (vertically and horizontally), combining inductive and deductive approaches.

    Outcomes and Results: All three dilemmas are relevant to the participants. They construct their self-identity as both the same as they were pre-stroke and changed. They are both the same and different in relation to other stroke survivors (with or without aphasia), i.e. both “disabled” and “normal”. They display both dependency and agency. Thus, they navigate the dilemmas by constantly negotiating what to include in their stories of self. In addition, telling one story of self offline does not imply telling the same story online.

    Conclusion: The dilemmas are intertwined and highly relevant to the participants. Offline and online settings evoke different ways for them to navigate the dilemmas. Increased awareness of the possible struggle with self-identity dilemmas in people with aphasia, and the possible difference between their online and offline self-identities, should be of value to family members, clinicians and researchers. Further research based on a larger sample is suggested. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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