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  • 1.
    Bennike, Søren
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ottesen, Laila Susanne
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Football Fitness – a new version of football?: A concept for adult players in Danish football clubs2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, nr Suppl. 1, s. 138-146Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores a new Danish football‐based activity for health called Football Fitness (FF). Data are from quantitative and qualitative methods, and the theoretical framework for the analysis of the organizational form of FF is the theory of path dependency (Mahoney) and first‐ and second‐order change (Watzlawick et al.). Theories of Pestoff concerning differences between state, market, and the civil society and theories of voluntary associations in a Danish context (Kaspersen & Ottesen; Ibsen & Seippel) are applied. This article indicates how FF is a result of the changing landscape of sport and argues that it can be beneficial to target sports organizations and include the expertise of non‐profit sports clubs if the goal is to raise the physical activity level of the local community and make these long lasting. But the organizations need to consider how this is to be done. FF, established by the Danish Football Association (FA) and managed by the voluntary clubs, is one example in a Danish context. Data indicate that FF is beneficial to the clubs involved in a number of ways. Among other things, it attracts new user groups and improves the club environment, including social activities and parental environment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 2.
    Bremander, A B
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Dahl, L L
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Roos, E M
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Validity and reliability of functional performance tests in meniscectomized patients with or without knee osteoarthritis2007Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, nr 2, s. 120-7Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Reduced functional performance and muscular dysfunction after knee injury and in knee osteoarthritis (OA) is suggested to be a factor in OA development. Validated functional performance tests applicable in the clinic and large-scale studies are lacking. The aim was to study the reliability and validity of 10 functional performance tests.

    METHODS: Two hundred and eighty-five subjects, 15-22 years post-meniscectomy, performed 10 functional performance tests. The mean age was 54 years (SD+/-11.2) and 79% were men; 52% had radiographic OA, and 48% were categorized as symptomatic. The tests were evaluated for test-retest reliability, discriminative ability (younger vs older age, men vs women, symptom-free vs symptomatic) and floor and ceiling effects.

    RESULTS: Two of the 10 tests, maximum number of knee bendings in 30 s and one-leg hop for distance, had good test-retest reliability (ICC 0.92, 95% CI 0.86-0.96 and 0.93, 95% CI 0.87-0.97) and were able to discriminate with regard to age, gender and symptoms, and had acceptable floor effects (9% and 3%, respectively).

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests the use of two functional performance tests: knee bendings/30 s and one-leg hop for distance, easy to use for evaluation of interventions due to knee injury and knee OA and when attaining long-term data of natural disease history.

  • 3.
    Clement, Damien
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United Kingdom.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Investigating the influence of intra-individual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, nr 4, s. 1461-1466Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that high levels of stress and stress responsivity can increase the risk of injuries. However, most of the research that has supported this notion has focused on between-person relationships, ignoring the relationships at the within-person level. As a result, the objective of this study was to investigate if within-person changes in perceived stress symptoms over a 1-month time period could predict injury rates during the subsequent 3 months. A prospective design with two measurement points (Time 1—at the beginning of the season and Time 2—1 month into the season) was utilized. A total of 121 competitive soccer players (85 males and 36 females; Mage = 18.39, SD = 3.08) from Sweden and the United States completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (KPDS) and a demographic sheet at Time 1. The KPDS was also completed at Time 2, and all acute injuries that occurred during the subsequent 3-month period were recorded. A Bayesian latent change scores model was used to determine whether within-person changes in stress symptoms could predict the risk of injury. Results revealed that there was a credible positive effect of changes in stress symptoms on injury rates, indicating that an increase in reported stress symptoms was related to an increased risk for injury. This finding highlights the importance of creating caring and supportive sporting environments and relationships and teaching stress management techniques, especially during the earlier portion of competitive seasons, to possibly reduce the occurrence of injuries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  • 4.
    Clement, Damien
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, United States.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Profiles of psychosocial factors: Can they be used to predict injury risk?2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 32, nr 4, s. 782-788Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The creation of risk profiles using the model of stress and athletic injury1 represents a proposed shift from the reductionism paradigm to the complex sport approach in an attempt to formulate prevention strategies to combat the increasing number of injuries being reported in sporting populations. As a result, the primary purpose of this study was to: a) identify different risk profiles based on psychosocial factors associated with the Williams and Andersen’s model of stress and athletic injury model; and b) examine potential differences in the frequency of injuries across these risk profiles. A prospective research design was utilized with a sample of 117 competitive soccer players (81 males and 36 females) from Sweden and the United States of America. Data was collected at two time points over the course of three months. At time 1 (beginning of the season) - a demographic information sheet, the Life Event Survey for Collegiate Athletes (LESCA), Sport Competitive Anxiety Test (SCAT), and Brief Cope were administered. At time two (T2), three months after the initial data collection, participants’ traumatic injuries were recorded. Latent profile analysis (LPA) showed that 3 profiles solution showed best fit to data. Players in profile 1 and 2 reported fewer injuries compared to players in profile 3. However, whereas individuals in profile 1 had a lower predictive risk of sustaining an injury when compared to those in profile 3, both profiles had similar anxiety levels and use of coping strategies with differing stress levels. These findings suggest that the interaction between different proposed risk factors might influence injury risk. © 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 5.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Strahler, Katharina
    Institute of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stelter, Reinhard
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Experiencing flow in different types of physical activity intervention programs: three randomized studies2010Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, nr Suppl. 1, s. 111-117Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether inactive individuals can experience flow, a rewarding, psychological state, during an exercise intervention and if there are differences according to the type of intervention they perform. Furthermore, the study investigates if experiencing flow is connected to physiological improvements attained during the exercise intervention. The 12‐ to 16‐week interventions included six randomized intervention groups, two female and four male groups performing continuous running, football, interval running and strength training. The results indicate that all six randomized exercise intervention groups experience rather high levels of flow regardless of whether the intervention is a team or individual sport. Differences in experiencing flow, worry and exertion as well as physiological improvements could be found for the different types of sports and the two genders, with the male football group having the highest score for physiological improvement and the lowest score for worry. A connection between experiencing flow and physiological improvement could not be found. Future research should investigate the influence that the participant's gender and also the type of sport have on experiencing flow, worry and perceived exertion. Furthermore, it should be investigated whether experiencing flow is linked to the long‐term compliance of regular physical activity. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S

  • 6.
    Elholm Madsen, Esben
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hansen, Tina
    Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Damsgaard Thomsen, Sidsel
    University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Panduro, Jeppe
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ermidis, Georgios
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Randers, Morten B.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Hvid Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Wikman, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Can psychological characteristics, football experience, and player status predict state anxiety before important matches in Danish elite-level female football players?2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 32, nr S1, s. 150-160Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite football can make players feel nervous, and personality characteristics, as well as experience, affect how well pressure is handled before important games. Studying the psychological characteristics of female football players can provide information on how well psychological pressure is handled and generate knowledge on how to support players in order to improve performance. Based on a sample of 128 female elite football players from 8 top-level teams, the present study investigates whether psychological characteristics and football experience/player stus in elite female football players can predict state anxiety before important matches. Our results outline that high age and national team experience negatively predicted most of the trait anxiety subscales. In line with previous research, no psychological differences were found between goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders, and strikers while starting players revealed to have significantly lower trait anxiety. When measuring before important matches, we found that somatic state anxiety was negatively associated with senior national team experience and positively associated with worry trait anxiety and fear of failure. Cognitive state anxiety was negatively associated with hope for success and positively associated with somatic and worry trait anxiety. Self-confidence was positively associated with youth national team experience and negatively associated with worry trait anxiety. It can be concluded that psychological characteristics and national team experience are both important for optimal state anxiety before important matches in elite-level women's football. Implications for practice and future research are discussed. © 2020 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Linn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    Primary Health Care Research and Development, Council Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Primary Health Care Research and Development, Council Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Social physique anxiety and sociocultural attitudes toward appearance impact on orthorexia test in fitness participants2008Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 389-394Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how scores on the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS) and the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ) relate to Bratman's orthorexia test (BOT) scores with regard to age, sex, and self-reported exercise frequency and duration in a sample of Swedish participants in fitness center activities. A total of 251 participants (166 women and 85 men) completed the SPAS, the SATAQ, and a questionnaire focusing on exercise frequency and duration. The results indicated that the SATAQ subdomain internalization could itself explain the variation in BOT results. In women, the results indicated that exercise frequency, followed by SPAS score and the SATAQ subdomains internalization and awareness, could together explain the variation in BOT results. Fitness centers could make a point of emphasizing that some physical ideals are neither healthy nor realistic, thus strengthening member self-image and preventing social physique anxiety, eating disorders, and negative attitudes toward appearance.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Linn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Marklund, Bertil
    Primary Health Care Research and Development, Council Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Primary Health Care Research and Development, Council Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    On the concept of orthorexia nervosa: a rebuttal: Letter to the Editor2008Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 397-397Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 9.
    Garthwaite, Taru
    et al.
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sjöros, Tanja
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Saara
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Koivumäki, Mikko
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vähä-Ypyä, Henri
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Eskola, Olli
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Rajander, Johan
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallio, Petri
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Saarenhovi, Maria
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Löyttyniemi, Eliisa
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sievänen, Harri
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Houttu, Noora
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laitinen, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kalliokoski, Kari
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland; University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet. Turku PET Centre, Turku, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Associations of sedentary time, physical activity, and fitness with muscle glucose uptake in adults with metabolic syndrome2022Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, nr 3, s. 353-358Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the associations of sedentary time, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness with skeletal muscle glucose uptake (GU). Methods: Sedentary time and physical activity were measured with accelerometers and VO2max with cycle ergometry in 44 sedentary adults with metabolic syndrome. Thigh muscle GU was determined with [18F]FDG-PET imaging. Results: Sedentary time (β = −0.374), standing (β = 0.376), steps (β = 0.351), and VO2max (β = 0.598) were associated with muscle GU when adjusted for sex, age, and accelerometer wear time. Adjustment for body fat-% turned all associations non-significant. Conclusion: Body composition is a more important determinant of muscle GU in this population than sedentary time, physical activity, or fitness. © 2022 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 10.
    H. Fosstveit, Sindre
    et al.
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Lohne-Seiler, Hilde
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Feron, Jack
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Lucas, Samuel J. E.
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    The intensity paradox: A systematic review and meta-analysis of its impact on the cardiorespiratory fitness of older adults2024Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 34, nr 2, artikkel-id e14573Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the effect of moderate- versus high-intensity aerobic exercise on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in older adults, taking into account the volume of exercise completed. Methods: The databases MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and CENTRAL (Cochrane Library) were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two reviewers extracted data and assessed bias. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software calculated overall effect size, intensity differences, and performed meta-regression analyses using pre-to-post intervention or change scores of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2peak). The review included 23 RCTs with 1332 older adults (intervention group: n = 932; control group: n = 400), divided into moderate-intensity (435 older adults) and high-intensity (476 older adults) groups. Results: Meta-regression analysis showed a moderate, but not significant, relationship between exercise intensity and improvements in V̇O2peak after accounting for the completed exercise volume (β = 0.31, 95% CI = [−0.04; 0.67]). Additionally, studies comparing moderate- versus high-intensity revealed a small, but not significant, effect in favor of high-intensity (Hedges' g = 0.20, 95% CI = [−0.02; 0.41]). Finally, no significant differences in V̇O2peak improvements were found across exercise groups employing various methods, modalities, and intensity monitoring strategies. Conclusion: Findings challenge the notion that high-intensity exercise is inherently superior and indicate that regular aerobic exercise, irrespective of the specific approach and intensity, provides the primary benefits to CRF in older adults. Future RCTs should prioritize valid and reliable methodologies for monitoring and reporting exercise volume and adherence among older adults. © 2024 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 11.
    Hagger, M. S.
    et al.
    Risk Analysis, Social Processes, and Health Group, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Asci, F. H.
    F.H. Aşçi, Sport Sciences Department, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Hein, V.
    Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Institute of Sport Pedagogy and Coaching Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Mulazimoglu-Balli, O.
    School of Sport Sciences and Technology, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey.
    Tarrant, M.
    School of Psychology, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom.
    Ruiz, Y. Pastor
    Department of Health Psychology, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Elche, Spain.
    Sell, V.
    School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Cross-cultural validity and measurement invariance of the social physique anxiety scale in five European nations2007Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, nr 6, s. 703-719Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The cross-cultural generalizability of the social physique anxiety scale (SPAS) was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) in five European nations: Britain, Estonia, Spain, Sweden, and Turkey. Motl and Conroy's (2000) methods were used to develop modified versions of the scale within each sample based on the original 12-item version. Pending the satisfactory fit of the CFAs of the modified models within each sample, it was expected that the measurement parameters and mean values of these models would be equivalent across samples in multisample CFAs. An eight-item version of the SPAS exhibited a good fit with data from the British, Estonian, and Swedish samples, and a seven-item version fitted the data well in the Spanish and Turkish samples. The eliminated items were also influenced by a method effect associated with the item wording. Multisample analyses revealed that factor loadings were equivalent across samples. Tests of latent means revealed that British and Spanish participants reported the highest levels of SPA, with Estonian participants reporting the lowest. Results indicate that the SPAS is generalizable across these cultures, although subtle variations existed in the Spanish and Turkish samples. Researchers are advised to follow these procedures to develop a valid version of the SPAS appropriate for their sample.

  • 12.
    Haraldsen, Heidi M.
    et al.
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway & Norwegian Research Centre of Children and Youth Sports, Oslo, Norway.
    Solstad, Bård Erlend
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway & Norwegian Research Centre of Children and Youth Sports, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Halvari, Hallgeir
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway & Department of Business, Marketing and Law, University of South‐Eastern Norway, Hønefoss, Norway.
    Abrahamsen, Frank E.
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Change in basic need frustration in relation to perfectionism, anxiety and performance in elite junior performers2020Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 30, nr 4, s. 754-765Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined whether there were different growth profiles in basic need frustration in elite junior performers over a nine‐month period. Subsequently, we examined whether the identified growth profiles differed in their levels of perfectionistic strivings and evaluative concerns measured at baseline and, additionally, whether they were associated with higher or lower levels of anxiety and perceived performance level in the end of the period. A sample of 259 (Mage = 17.31; SDage = 0.97) elite junior performers from sports and performing arts completed an online questionnaire to report their self‐ratings of the study variables. The analyses were conducted using growth mixture modeling in Mplus 8.0. Two main contrasting growth profiles were identified in each of the basic need frustration. Perfectionistic strivings were overall higher than evaluative concerns, but did not differ between the growth profiles. Conversely, evaluative concerns differed significantly between the identified growth profiles. Higher levels of evaluative concerns were associated with the most maladaptive growth profiles. Indeed, elite junior performers, who experienced moderate and increasing levels of competence and autonomy frustration, reported higher levels of anxiety and lower levels of perceived performance level than those who reported low and decreasing levels of competence and autonomy frustration. Based on these findings, evaluative concerns and basic need frustration appear to play key roles in the development of maladaptive motivational processes over time. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 13.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Successful talent development in track and field: Considering the role of environment2010Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, nr Suppl.2, s. 122-132Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Track and field includes a number of high intensity disciplines with many demanding practices and represents a motivational challenge for talented athletes aiming to make a successful transition to the senior elite level. Based on a holistic ecological approach, this study presents an analysis of a particular athletic talent development environment (ATDE) in track and field, the IFK Växjö track and field club, and examines key factors behind its successful history of creating top level athletes. The research takes the form of a case study. Data were collected from multiple perspectives (in-depth interviews with administrators, coaches and athletes), from multiple situations (observation of training, competitions and meetings) and from the analysis of documents. The environment was characterized by a high degree of cohesion, by the organization of athletes and coaches into groups and teams, and by the important role given to elite athletes. A strong organizational culture, characterized by values of open co-operation, by a focus on performance process and by a whole person approach, provided an important basis for the environment’s success. The holistic ecological approach encourages practitioners to broaden their focus beyond the individual in their efforts to help talented junior athletes make a successful transition to elite senior level.

  • 14.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Coping strategies among long-term injured competitive athletes. A study of 81 men and women in team and individual sports1997Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 7, nr 6, s. 367-372Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in personality, mood and coping ability between athletes of a high competitive level with long-term injuries (n=81), with a mean age of 24.4 years, and a matched non-injured group (n=64), with a mean age of 24.2 years, were investigated. Three self-rating scales were employed: mood adjective check-list, general coping questionnaire and Karolinska scales of personality. Although no differences in basic personality traits were found, being injured was found to result in a depressed mood state and in the activation of coping strategies directed at receiving help. Comparisons were made between injured male and female athletes as well as between team-sport and individual-sport athletes. Women were found to become more anxious and tense and to have a stronger inclination to use emotion-focused coping strategies. Team-sport athletes were found to cope more in terms of 'passive acceptance' of help from others, whereas individual athletes were found to activate 'problem-solving' strategies in face of a stressor. The results suggest that social aspects of rehabilitative work are important and support the concept that rehabilitative work with long-term injured athletes should be individualized to be maximally effective. They also support the usefulness of cognitive models of the injured athlete's experience of being long-term injured. Such models, however, do not account for differences between the sexes or between individual and team athletes.

  • 15.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Psychological predictors of sport injuries among junior soccer players2011Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 129-136Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous researches have established models that specifypsychological factors that could predict sport injuries. One example is Williams and Andersen’s stress–injury modelstressing factors such as anxiety, negative life stress and few coping resources. The purpose of the current study was to find psychological factors that could lead to an increased injury risk among junior soccer players, in addition to construct an empirical model of injury risk factors for soccer players. The participants were 108 male and female soccer players (m = 17,6) studying at soccer high schools in southwest Sweden. Five questionnaires were used, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Sport Anxiety Scale, Life Events Survey for Collegiate Athletes, Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 and Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Injury record was collected by athletic trainers at the schools during a period of 8 months. The result suggested four significant predictors that together could explain 23% of injury occurrence.The main factors are life event stress, somatic trait anxiety, mistrust and ineffective coping. These findings partly support Williams and Andersen’s stress–injury model and are organized into an empirical model. Recommendations are given to sport medicine teams and coaches concerning issues in sport injury prevention.

  • 16.
    Josefsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Archer, Trevor
    y of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Physical exercise intervention in depressive disorders: Meta-analysis and systematic review2013Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 259-272Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous meta-analyses investigating the effect of exercise on depression have included trials where the control condition has been categorized as placebo despite the fact that this particular placebo intervention (e.g., meditation, relaxation) has been recognized as having an antidepressant effect. Because meditation and mindfulness-based interventions are associated with depression reduction, it is impossible to separate the effect of the physical exercise from the meditation-related parts. The present study determined the efficacy of exercise in reducing symptoms of depression compared with no treatment, placebo conditions or usual care among clinically defined depressed adults. Of 89 retrieved studies, 15 passed the inclusion criteria of which 13 studies presented sufficient information for calculating effect sizes. The main result showed a significant large overall effect favoring exercise intervention. The effect size was even larger when only trials that had used no treatment or placebo conditions were analyzed. Nevertheless, effect size was reduced to a moderate level when only studies with high methodological quality were included in the analysis. Exercise may be recommended for people with mild and moderate depression who are willing, motivated, and physically healthy enough to engage in such a program.

  • 17.
    Lind, Rune Rasmussen
    et al.
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Beck, Mikkel Malling
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Malarski, Krzysztof
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Geertsen, Svend Sparre
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise & Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Acute high-intensity football games can improve children's inhibitory control and neurophysiological measures of attention2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, nr 10, s. 1546-1562Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that a single bout of exercise can lead to transient performance improvements in specific cognitive domains in children. However, more knowledge is needed to determine the key exercise characteristics for obtaining these effects and how they translate into real-world settings. In the present study, we investigate how small-sided football games of either high-or moderate-intensity affect measures of inhibitory control in a school setting. Eighty-one children (mean age 11.8, 48 boys) were randomly allocated to three groups performing 20-minute of high-intensity small-sided real football games (SRF), moderate-intensity small-sided walking football games (SWF) or resting (RF). Behavioral measures of inhibitory control and neurophysiological measures of attention (P300 latency and amplitude) were obtained during a flanker task performed at baseline and 20 minutes following the intervention. Retention of declarative memory was assessed in a visual memory task 7 days after the intervention. Measures of inhibitory control improved more in children performing SRF compared to SWF 19 ms, 95% CI [7, 31 ms] (P = 0.041). This was paralleled by larger increases in P300 amplitudes at Fz in children performing SRF compared both to RF in congruent (3.54 mu V, 95% CI [0.85, 6.23 mu V], P = 0.039) and incongruent trials (5.56 mu V, 95% CI [2.87, 8.25 mu V], P < 0.001) and compared to SWF in incongruent trials (4.10 mu V, 95% CI [1.41, 6.68 mu V], P = 0.010). No effects were found in measures of declarative memory. Together this indicates that acute high-intensity small-sided football games can transiently improve measures of inhibitory control and neurophysiological correlates of attention. Intense small-sided football games are easily implementable and can be employed by practitioners, for example, during breaks throughout the school day. © 2019 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 18.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The role of exercise and gender for physical self-perceptions and importance ratings in Swedish university students2004Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 14, nr 6, s. 373-380Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how scores on the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP), including scores on the Perceived Importance Profile (PIP), were related to self-reported exercise frequency, duration, and gender in sample of Swedish university students. A total of 164 participants completed the PSPP, PIP, and a questionnaire focusing on frequency and duration of exercise. Exercise frequency, duration, and gender predicted best the PSPP sub-domains of Sport Competence and Physical Conditioning. Exercising more frequently, and for a longer time on each occasion was associated with higher PSPP and PIP scores. Women generally displayed lower PSPP scores than men. These results suggest that exercise professionals need to master a range of appropriate exercise strategies, since doubts concerning self-presentation may work against establishing a regular exercise routine.

  • 19.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom & Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lemyre, Nicolas
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    The temporal relations across burnout dimensions in athletes2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 1215-1226Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Burnout is a construct that has garnered considerable attention in sport psychology within recent years. Several hypothesized models regarding how the three dimen-sions (exhaustion, devaluation, and reduced sense of accomplishment) temporally relate to each other have been advanced. One proposal outlined by Maslach and Leiter suggests that exhaustion predicts devaluation which predicts reduced sense of accomplishment. However, there is no consensus among researchers as it has been argued that exhaustion predicts devaluation and reduced accomplishment separately. The aim of this study was to test multiple alternative hypotheses regarding the rela-tionships of the burnout dimensions in athletes. Two samples of Swedish youth elite athletes with differing time spans between measurements were used. Specifically, one sample involved time- intensive measures collected every week over an eight- week period, and the other sample included four measurement points across an 18- month period. Results showed that none of the previously proposed models outlining the temporal relations of burnout dimensions were supported. Statistical analysis of the models including the cross- lagged predictions of dimensions did not have any statistically significant impact except when exhaustion negatively predicted devalu-ation between time 1 (month 0) and time 2 (month 6) in the 18- month sample; this relation faded in the following time points. Further, issues regarding the stability of devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment emerged as their autocorrelation were very weak in the time- intensive sample. These findings raise a number of points for further theoretical and practical discussions about the athlete burnout construct. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 20.
    Madsen, Esben Elholm
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Krustrup, Peter
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Hansen, Tina
    Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Aggestrup, Charlotte Sandager
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten Hvid
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Pfeffer, Kristina
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Ryom, Knud
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte Nejst
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Madsen, Mads
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Madsen, Jeppe Elholm
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne Marie
    University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Motivational predictors of children's involvement in out-of-school activities: An application of a football program2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, nr 1, s. 72-83Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The “11 for Health in Denmark” in-school educational football program has shown to have numerous positive physiological and psychological effects in 10- to 12-year-old schoolchildren. A key part of the successful application of the program, however, has not yet been examined, namely the motivational processes underlying participation and behavioral changes. This study examined such motivational processes (i.e., autonomous motivation, beliefs, and intentions) using the trans-contextual model (TCM) and investigated if the 11 for Health in Denmark program increased intentions to participate in physical activity (PA) outside of school in 10- to 12-year-old schoolchildren. Using a web-based questionnaire, Danish-speaking schoolchildren (N = 276 [boys, 50.4%]; Mage = 10.44, SD = 0.35) from three schools and seven classes completed TCM-based questionnaires at three time-points (weeks 0, 1, and 5) while participating in the 11 for Health in Denmark program. Single-indicator structural equation modeling was performed to examine goodness-of-fit and parameter estimates. A path analysis using maximum likelihood estimation was used to test the direct and indirect effects of the TCM model. The results partly supported a mediation sequence, as we found significant direct effects in eight of 13 motivational variables (β = −0.25–0.83, p <0.05), indirect effects in one of nine variables (β = 0.15, p < 0.01), but no effects with regard to PA behavior. Findings provide evidence for a motivational link between Danish-speaking schoolchildren's autonomous and controlled motivation from in school to out of school, and may inform future interventions promoting motivation and participation in out of school PA. © 2022 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 21.
    Madsen, Mads
    et al.
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Institute of Sport Psychology and Physical Education, Faculty of Sport Science, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Madsen, Esben Elholm
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Department of Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and Psychomotor Therapy, University College Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ermidis, Georgios
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Department of Movement Sciences and Wellness, “Parthenope” University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Ryom, Knud
    Department of Public Health, Section of Health Promotion and Global Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Rasmussen Lind, Rune
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Malte Nejst
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster (SHSC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, Shanghai University of Sport (SUS), Shanghai, China.
    The “11 for Health in Denmark” intervention in 10- to 12-year-old Danish girls and boys and its effects on well-being—A large-scale cluster RCT2020Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 30, nr 9, s. 1787-1795Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The present study investigates the well‐being effects for 10‐ to 12‐year‐old children  who participated in the school‐based intervention “11 for Health in Denmark,” which comprises physical activity (PA) and health education. Subgroup analyses were carried out for boys and girls.

    Method: Three thousand sixty‐one children were randomly assigned to an intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG) by 5:1 cluster randomization by school. 2533 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4; 49.7% boys) were assigned to IG and 528 children (mean age 11.4 ± 0.5; 50.8% boys) were assigned to CG. IG participated in the “11 for Health in Denmark” 11‐week program, consisting of 2 × 45 min per week of football drills, small‐sided games, and health education. CG did not participate in any intervention and continued with their regular education. Before and after the intervention period, both groups answered a shortened version of the multidimensional well‐being questionnaire KIDSCREEN‐27.

    Results: The “11 for Health in Denmark” intervention program had a positive effect on physical well‐being in girls (IG: 48.6 ± 8.5 to 50.2 ± 9.3), whereas the improvement was not significant in boys. The program also had a positive impact on well‐being scores for peers and social support (IG: 50.2 ± 10.2 to 50.8 ± 10.1), though when analyzed separately in the subgroups of boys and girls the changes were not significant. No between‐group differences were found for psychological well‐being or school environment.

    Conclusion: The intervention program had a positive between‐group effect on physical well‐being in girls, whereas the change was not significant in boys. The overall scores for peers and social support improved during the intervention period, but no subgroup differences were found.

     © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 22.
    Martin, Simon
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. APERE, UPJV, Amiens, France.
    Edouard, Pascal
    Université Jean Monnet, Lyon 1, Université Savoie Mont-Blanc, Inter-university Laboratory of Human Movement Biology, Saint-Etienne, France; University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Université d'Orléans, Orleans, France; Université Paris Saclay, Orsay, France.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Overuse injury and affects in competitive sport: A prospective longitudinal study2024Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 34, nr 5, artikkel-id e14644Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Overuse injuries, which have a high prevalence in sport, are suggested to result in different affective responses in comparison to traumatic injuries. Affects may also reciprocally act as risk factors for overuse injury. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between overuse injury and affects within a longitudinal follow-up design. Competitive athletes (N = 149) of various sports and levels of competition completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Overuse injury questionnaire (OSTRC-O) once a week over 10 consecutive weeks. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to evaluate the associations within and across weeks between OSTRC-O severity score and affects. Results indicated that OSTRC-O severity score and positive affects (PA) had a statistically significant negative within-week relation (r = −24.51, 95% CI = [−33.9, −15.1], p < 0.001). Higher scores of overuse injury were significantly related to lower levels of PA across weeks (ß = −0.02, 95% CI = [−0.04, −0.001], p = 0.044), while the reciprocal effect of PA on overuse injury was not significant (ß = −0.13, 95% CI = [−0.52, 0.26], p = 0.51). No statistically significant association was observed between OSTRC-O severity score and negative affects, neither within nor across weeks. Our findings suggest that overuse injury may have adverse psychological consequences on the long run through lessened PA and address the need for providing sustainable psychological support focusing upon such PA when working with athletes experiencing overuse injury. © 2024 The Author(s). Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 23.
    Moesch, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hauge, Marie-Louse Trier
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Late specialization: the key to success in centimeters, grams, or seconds (cgs) sports2011Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, nr 6, s. 282-290Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A controversial question within elite sports is whether young athletes need to specialize early, as suggested by Ericsson et al., or if it is more beneficial to follow the path of early diversification proposed by Côté et al., which includes sampling different sport experiences during childhood and specializing later on during adolescence. Based on a Danish sample of 148 elite and 95 near‐elite athletes from cgs sports (sports measured in centimeters, grams, or seconds), the present study investigates group differences concerning accumulated practice hours during the early stages of the career, involvement in other sports, career development, as well as determining whether or not these variables predict membership in the elite group. The results clearly reveal that elite athletes specialized at a later age and trained less in childhood. However, elite athletes were shown to intensify their training regime during late adolescence more than their near‐elite peers. The involvement in other sports neither differs between the groups nor predicts success. It can be concluded that factors related to the organization of practice during the mid‐teens seem to be crucial for international success within cgs sports. Future research should adopt a longitudinal design with means of drawing causal inferences. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S

  • 24.
    Nielsen, Glen
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Appleton, Paul R.
    Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Bentsen, Peter
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elsborg, Peter
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Predicting adolescents' continuation in club sports: A prospective cohort study of the importance of personal and contextual motivational factors in five sports in Denmark2024Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 34, nr 4, artikkel-id e14616Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the influence of types of motivation, basic psychological needs satisfaction and of a coach-created motivational climate on continued participation in youth sports across types of sport, competitive levels, ages, and gender. Methods: Participants were 7110 adolescent (age 12–20 years) members of leisure time club organized in basketball, handball, football, badminton, and gymnastics in Denmark. Motivational regulation was measured with BRSQ-6, basic psychological needs satisfaction and frustration were measured with PNSS-S, and coach-created climate was measured with the EDMCQ-C. The participants' continuation or dropout was measured at the beginning of the following season with a short electronic questionnaire. Results: Intrinsic motivation, identified behavior regulation, experiences of competence, relatedness, and autonomy, as well as a coach-created empowering motivational climate, were associated with continuation both in the sport and in the club the following season across different sports, genders, age groups, and competitive levels. Introjected and external behavior regulation, frustrations with the need to experience competence, relatedness, and autonomy, as well as a disempowering coach-created climate, were associated with dropout. Conclusion: In Danish youth sports, autonomous motivation, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and an empowering coach-created motivational climate have a positive impact on the continuation of the sport and the club the following season. In contrast, controlled types of motivation, needs frustration, and a disempowering coach-created climate are associated with dropout. This is the case at both elite and recreational levels, for boys and girls, adolescents, and youth. © 2024 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 25.
    Nielsen, Glen
    et al.
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jensen, Christian Jais
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schmidt, Jakob Friis
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gliemann, Lasse
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Thomas Rostgaard
    Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Health promotion: The impact of beliefs of health benefits, social relations and enjoyment on exercise continuation2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, nr Suppl. 1, s. 66-75Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how and why participants in structured exercise intervention programs continue or stop exercising after the program is finished. We conducted four focus group interviews with four groups of middle-aged and elderly men (total n=28) who had participated in exercise interventions involving playing either a team sport (football) or a more individually focused activity (spinning and crossfit). Our results show that different social, organizational and material structures inherent in the different activities shape the subjects' enjoyment of exercise participation, as well as their intention and ability to continue being active. In conclusion, team sport activities seem to be intrinsically motivating to the participants through positive social interaction and play. They are therefore more likely to result in exercise continuation than activities that rely primarily on extrinsic motivation such as the expectation of improved health and well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 26.
    Norha, Jooa
    et al.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sjöros, Tanja
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Garthwaite, Taru
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laine, Saara
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Saarenhovi, Maria
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kallio, Petri
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Laitinen, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Houttu, Noora
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Vähä-Ypyä, Henri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
    Löyttyniemi, Eliisa
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Vasankari, Tommi
    Ukk Institute For Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland; University Of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Knuuti, Juhani
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kalliokoski, Kari K.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet. University Of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Effects of reducing sedentary behavior on cardiorespiratory fitness in adults with metabolic syndrome: A 6-month RCT2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, nr 8, s. 1452-1461Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with adverse health outcomes. Previous observational and cross-sectional studies have suggested that reducing sedentary behavior (SB) might improve CRF. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a 6-month intervention of reducing SB on CRF in 64 sedentary inactive adults with metabolic syndrome in a non-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Materials and Methods:

    In the intervention group (INT, n = 33), the aim was to reduce SB by 1 h/day for 6 months without increasing exercise training. Control group (CON, n = 31) was instructed to maintain their habitual SB and physical activity. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was measured by maximal graded bicycle ergometer test with respiratory gas measurements. Physical activity and SB were measured during the whole intervention using accelerometers.

    Results:

    Reduction in SB did not improve VO2max statistically significantly (group × time p &gt; 0.05). Maximal absolute power output (Wmax) did not improve significantly but increased in INT compared to CON when scaled to fat free mass (FFM) (at 6 months INT 1.54 [95% CI: 1.41, 1.67] vs. CON 1.45 [1.32, 1.59] Wmax/kgFFM, p = 0.036). Finally, the changes in daily step count correlated positively with the changes in VO2max scaled to body mass and FFM (r = 0.31 and 0.30, respectively, p &lt; 0.05).

    Discussion:

    Reducing SB without adding exercise training does not seem to improve VO2max in adults with metabolic syndrome. However, succeeding in increasing daily step count may increase VO2max. © 2023 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 27.
    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen
    et al.
    Section of Integrated Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Vorup, Jacob
    Section of Integrated Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Nistrup, Anne
    Section of Members of Sport, Individual & Society, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Wikman, Johan Michael
    Section of Members of Sport, Individual & Society, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Alstrøm, Joachim Meno
    Section of Integrated Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Sandfeld Melcher, Pia
    Section of Integrated Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Pfister, Gertrud Ursula
    Section of Members of Sport, Individual & Society, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Section of Integrated Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Effect of team sports and resistance training on physical function, quality of life, and motivation in older adults2017Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, nr 8, s. 852-864Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of team sports and resistance training on physical function, psychological health, quality of life, and motivation in older untrained adults. Twenty‐five untrained men and forty‐seven untrained women aged 80 (range: 67‐93) years were recruited. Fifty‐one were assigned to a training group (TRG) of which twenty‐five performed team training (TG) and twenty‐six resistance training (RG). The remaining twenty‐one were allocated to a control group (CG). TRG trained for 1 hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Compared with CG, TRG improved the number of arm curls within 30 seconds (P<.05) and 30‐seconds chair stand (P<.05) during the intervention. In TRG, participation in training led to higher (P<.05) scores in the subscales psychological well‐being, general quality of life, and health‐related quality of life, as well as decreased anxiety and depression levels. No differences between changes in TG and RG were found over the intervention period, neither in physical function tests nor psychological questionnaires. Both TG and RG were highly motivated for training, but TG expressed a higher degree of enjoyment and intrinsic motivation mainly due to social interaction during the activity, whereas RG was more motivated by extrinsic factors like health and fitness benefits. In conclusion, both team training and resistance training improved physical function, psychological well‐being, and quality of life. However, team sport training motivated the participants more by intrinsic factors than resistance training. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 28.
    Piussi, Ramana
    et al.
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center (SSMC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krupic, Ferid
    Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center (SSMC), Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Senorski, Carl
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svantesson, Eleonor
    Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center (SSMC), Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundemo, David
    Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center (SSMC), Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Hamrin Senorski, Eric
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center (SSMC), Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychological impairments after ACL injury – Do we know what we are addressing? Experiences from sports physical therapists2021Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 31, nr 7, s. 1508-1517Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological impairments can follow an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and can impact the rehabilitation process. Our aim was to investigate experiences of sports physical therapists (PTs) in addressing psychological impairments in patients after ACL injury. We conducted four focus group interviews with fourteen sports PTs. The PTs’ experiences of working with psychological impairments after ACL injury were summarized in four main categories: (1) “Calling for a guiding light”, where PTs stated that the most common method of acquiring knowledge on addressing psychological impairments was through discussions with colleagues, and, at the same time, PTs expressed an insufficient knowledge of how to address psychological impairments; (2) “Meeting the burden of psychological impairments” where PTs stated that psychological impairments are greater than physical; (3) “Trying to balance physical and psychological aspects” where patient education and assessments were reported to be important in order to understand psychological impairments during rehabilitation; and (4) “Goal setting: a helpful challenge” where sports PTs expressed a need for specific knowledge of the rehabilitation of psychological impairments following ACL injury. To help provide the current best practice, we encourage researchers to develop psychologically centered interventions for rehabilitation after an ACL injury, and PTs to stay up-to-date with the literature published on the subject, including to implement eventual interventions. © 2021 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 29.
    Simonsson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Cajsa
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Piussi, Ramana
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kaarre, Janina
    Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Center For Sports Medicine, Pittsburgh, United States.
    Thomeé, Roland
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. University Of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; Swedish Olympic Committee, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kristian
    Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hamrin Senorski, Eric
    Sportrehab, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Sports Medicine Center, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Olympic Committee, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To achieve the unachievable—Patients' experiences of opting for delayed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction after trying rehabilitation alone as primary treatment: A qualitative study2024Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 1-14, artikkel-id e14569Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: About 50% of patients who sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are treated without ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). A significant proportion of these patients opt for late ACL-R. Patients' experience of changing treatment has not yet been investigated and presented in the scientific literature. Aim: To explore patients' experiences before and after changing treatment from ACL rehabilitation alone to ACL-R. Method: Fifteen patients were interviewed in semi-structured interviews, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed with qualitative content analysis, based on the method described by Graneheim and Lundman. Patients were between 26 and 58 years old, and had tried rehabilitation for a minimum of 9 months prior to ACL-R. Results: Two themes, “Expecting what could not be achieved: the struggle to recover and not becoming stable”, and “Internal completeness: expectations can be achieved”, emerged from the analysis. Each theme was supported by three main categories and 5–6 subcategories. The first theme represents the journey before ACL-R, where patients experienced getting stronger, but perceived the knee as unstable. The second theme represents the journey after ACL-R, where patients expressed that they felt whole after their ACL-R, and where able to achieve their expections. Patients experienced a greater support from the healthcare system, and ultimately expressed a feeling of having achieved the unachievable after ACL-R. Summary: Patients who cross over from ACL rehabilitation to ACL-R experienced rehabilitation alone as insufficient to achieve the desired outcomes, which resulted in a need to opt for delayed ACL-R. Healthcare providers need to support patients, who primarily choose to undergo rehabilitation alone and later opt for ACL-R, throughout the whole rehabilitation process. © 2024 The Authors. 

  • 30.
    Sivaramakrishnan, Hamsini
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Quested, Eleanor
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Cheval, Boris
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Gucciardi, Daniel F.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för företagande, innovation och hållbarhet. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Predictors of intentions of adults over 35 years to participate in walking sport programs: A social-ecological mixed-methods approach2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 33, nr 8, s. 1412-1430Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing need to identify acceptable and feasible opportunities to engage adults over 35 years in physical activity. Walking sports may be a potential means to engage adults in sport; however, there is limited evidence regarding appeal and feasibility to support its implementation and delivery. Using a two-step mixed-methods approach, we aimed (1) to quantitively identify significant predictors of intentions of adults over 35 years to participate in walking sports and (2) to understand why and how these identified predictors may be contextually relevant to the target group. In phase one, 282 adults over 35 years (Mage = 46.08, SD = 9.75) without prior experience of walking sports completed an online questionnaire assessing personal, psychosocial, program-related, and environmental predictors, and intentions to participate in walking sports. Hierarchical multiple linear regressions showed that perceived health status, attitudes, subjective norms, and distance of venue were significant predictors of intentions. In phase two, interviews with a subset of 17 participants indicated that, when implementing walking sport programs, program labeling, fear of the unknown, and individual differences in the appeal of walking sport warrant consideration. Together, these findings offer insight into the complex interplay of personal, psychosocial, program-related, and environmental predictors of adults' intentions to participate in walking sports. Addressing these elements of a walking sport program would make such programs more appealing to potential participants, and ultimately, more feasible and sustainable to conduct in the long run. © 2023 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 31.
    Tranaeus, U.
    et al.
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heintz, E.
    Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, Stockholm, Sweden & Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Forssblad, M.
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Werner, S.
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injuries in Swedish floorball: a cost analysis2017Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, nr 5, s. 508-513Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiology of sport injuries is well documented. However, the costs are rarely discussed. Previous studies have presented such costs in specific sports or localization. No study has investigated the costs related to injuries in elite floorball. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate cost of injuries in Swedish elite floorball players. During 1year, 346 floorball players were prospectively followed. All time-loss injures were recorded. The injured players were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their costs tied to the injury. Mean costs were calculated by multiplying the total resource use with the collected unit costs and dividing these total costs with the number of injuries as well as players. The results showed that the average cost per injury increased with the level of severity and ranged from 332 to 2358 Euros. The mild and moderate overuse injuries were costlier than the corresponding traumatic injuries. However, the severe traumatic injuries were associated with higher costs than overuse injuries. Knee injuries were the costliest. Our results indicate that there are costs to be saved, if floorball injuries can be avoided. They should be of interest to decision makers deciding whether to invest in preventive interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 32.
    Western, Benedikte
    et al.
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Vistad, Ingvild
    University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Sørlandet Hospital, Kristiansand, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    University Of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; Department Of Public Health And Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aaronson, Neil K.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Radcliffe, Gillian
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    van Beurden, Marc
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Bohus, Martin
    Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; University Of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium.
    Courneya, Kerry S.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Daley, Amanda J.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Galvão, Daniel A.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Garrod, Rachel
    King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Goedendorp, Martine M.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Griffith, Kathleen A.
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., United States.
    van Harten, Wim H.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands; University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands.
    Hayes, Sandi C.
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Herrero-Roman, Fernando
    Fundación Giafys Cancer, Miranda de Ebro, Spain.
    Hiensch, Anouk E.
    University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Irwin, Melinda L.
    Yale University, New Haven, United States.
    James, Erica
    The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
    Kenkhuis, Marlou Floor
    Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kersten, Marie José
    Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Knoop, Hans
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lucia, Alejandro
    European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    May, Anne M.
    University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    McConnachie, Alex
    University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    van Mechelen, Willem
    Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; University Of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Mutrie, Nanette
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Newton, Robert U.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Nollet, Frans
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Oldenburg, Hester S.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Plotnikoff, Ron
    The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
    Schmidt, Martina E.
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schmitz, Katie H.
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, United States.
    Schulz, Karl Heinz
    University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Short, Camille E.
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sonke, Gabe S.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Steindorf, Karen
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Stuiver, Martijn M.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Taaffe, Dennis R.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Thorsen, Lene
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Velthuis, Miranda J.
    Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Wenzel, Jennifer
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States.
    Winters-Stone, Kerri M.
    Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, United States.
    Wiskemann, Joachim
    German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Berntsen, Sveinung
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Buffart, Laurien M.
    Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Dropout from exercise trials among cancer survivors—An individual patient data meta-analysis from the POLARIS study2024Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 1-10, artikkel-id e14575Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of exercise among cancer survivors has increased in recent years; however, participants dropping out of the trials are rarely described. The objective of the present study was to assess which combinations of participant and exercise program characteristics were associated with dropout from the exercise arms of RCTs among cancer survivors. Methods: This study used data collected in the Predicting OptimaL cAncer RehabIlitation and Supportive care (POLARIS) study, an international database of RCTs investigating the effects of exercise among cancer survivors. Thirty-four exercise trials, with a total of 2467 patients without metastatic disease randomized to an exercise arm were included. Harmonized studies included a pre and a posttest, and participants were classified as dropouts when missing all assessments at the post-intervention test. Subgroups were identified with a conditional inference tree. Results: Overall, 9.6% of the participants dropped out. Five subgroups were identified in the conditional inference tree based on four significant associations with dropout. Most dropout was observed for participants with BMI &gt;28.4 kg/m2, performing supervised resistance or unsupervised mixed exercise (19.8% dropout) or had low-medium education and performed aerobic or supervised mixed exercise (13.5%). The lowest dropout was found for participants with BMI &gt;28.4 kg/m2 and high education performing aerobic or supervised mixed exercise (5.1%), and participants with BMI ≤28.4 kg/m2 exercising during (5.2%) or post (9.5%) treatment. Conclusions: There are several systematic differences between cancer survivors completing and dropping out from exercise trials, possibly affecting the external validity of exercise effects. © 2024 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science In Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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