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  • 1.
    Bökberg, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Janlöv, Ann-Christin
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    Professional care providers and stakeholders’ views of best practice in the care for persons with dementia in Sweden2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. S369-S370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Dementia implies progressive loss of mental and physical functions during the trajectory of the disease (Porter & Kaplan, 2012). Persons with dementia need involvement of various and several care providers throughout the stages of dementia, and more knowledge is needed about best practice strategies in this complexity of care (Gurner, 2001). The aim of the study was to explore professional care providers and stakeholders’ views of best practice in concepts of information, collaboration and communication in the care for persons with dementia in Sweden.

    Method: The study had a qualitative approach based on three focus group interviews with a variation among participants regarding professions and workplaces to represent different types of care for persons with dementia from diagnosis to end of life care. The transcribed verbatim was analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Preliminary results: In early stages primary health care specialized in dementia had close collaboration, training and mentoring, with memory clinic and home care. In the later stages the person with dementia had less frequent contacts with primary health care. Day care played an important role in information delivery of the disease, in collaboration with home and institutional care. In the latest stage the family had an important role as a proxy for the person with dementia about desires in the care.

    Conclusion: A well-functioning network in professional care seems to have an impact on persons with dementia to remain at home despite loss of mental and physical functions.

    On the behalf of RightTimePlaceCare consortium. http://www.righttimeplacecare.eu.

  • 2.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    et al.
    The Pufendorf Institute of Advanced Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    Challis, David
    Personal Social Services Research Unit, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Hamers, Jan
    Health Services Research, Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Meyer, Gabriele
    School of Nursing Science, Witten/Herdecke University, Germany.
    Saks, Kai
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Soto, Maria
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Toulouse University Hospital, France.
    Zabalegui, Adela
    Fundacio Privada Clinic per la Recerca Biomedica, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    The dementia care system in the eight RTPC European countries2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. S212-S212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Exploring the care and service activities offered throughout the trajectory of dementia is an opportunity for countries to learn from each other. As part of the RightTimePlaceCare project’s general objective to develop best practice strategies this presentation describes development, content and application of a template to explore the dementia health, social care and welfare systems from early sign, diagnosis, intermediate and moderate stage and to the late stage of the disease. It also describes some of the findings with regard to the chain of care and service for people with dementia.

    Method: A step-wise consensus procedure was applied to identify, define and develop a template covering care and service throughout the disease trajectory. In addition the professionals involved were identified and defined as for their educational level.

    Results: In total 50 care and service activities compiled in seven groups were identified: 1) Screening, diagnostic procedure, treatment of dementia and complications; 2) Outpatient care facilities; 3) Care at home; 4) Institutional care; 5) Palliative care; 6) Informal caregiving and support; 7) Civic activities. The largest differences in terms of availability were found for care activities specifically for people with dementia. Non-pharmacological treatment was not commonly utilized in whilst pharmacological treatment for BPSD was common. Also education and social support to family caregivers was sparsely utilized.

    Conclusion: The care and service offered to people with dementia and family caregivers covers a wide range of activities. Facilities specifically for dementia varies among countries.There are more similarities among countries than differences.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lethin, Connie
    Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Emilsson, Ulla M.
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Institutional care for older people with dementia in an European perspective2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. S419-S419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cognitive impairment has been found to be a main predictor for institutionalization. Various types of institutional care are available for persons with dementia, but knowledge is sparse about how the institution should be designed and scaled, and if it should be specialised in dementia or mixed with other older people. To explore various types of institutional care for older people with dementia in eight European countries.

    Method: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and UK were included in the study. A template was developed for collecting data among other areas also about various institutional care. Terminology was reviewed by experts and agreed between the countries. The template covers 50 types of care provided in relation to the dementia trajectory, from diagnosis to end of life stage. Questions about various types of institutional care were analysed. Each question covered estimation of availability, utilization and professionals involved.

    Results: In the description of the care system, preliminary results showed that residential home or nursing home not specifically organised for persons with dementia was the most common institution through all stages. Institutions more specialised in dementia care was less common and mostly available for those in moderate to end of life stage. The professionals were more educated in dementia in the specialised institutions compared to non specialised institutions.

    Conclusion: For people with dementia disease, institutions not specific for those with dementia were common in all eight countries, while institutions more specialised were available for few. 

    On the behalf of RightTimePlaceCare consortium. http://www.righttimeplacecare.eu

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Nam, Sangyo
    Department of Health Services Administration, Yuhan University, Korea.
    The study of Care Quality in nursing homes for older persons with dementia in Sweden, in relation to characteristics of the inhabitants and facility2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. S424-S425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Older people with dementia admitting to nursing homes are vulnerable persons and in need of extensive care and service. To develop strategies for improvements in nursing homes for people with dementia it is important to provide knowledge about factors that will have an impact on care quality. The aim of this study was to investigate comparisons and correlations between care quality and, the characteristics of the inhabitants and the nursing home facilities.

    Method: Data was collected from 51 nursing homes and 115 newly admitted persons 65 years or older with dementia. Statistical analysis included comparisons and correlations between characteristics of the nursing homes, inhabitants’ condition and the rating of care quality called CLINT( Vaarama 2009).

    Results: The people were in mean 85 years old and those living in nursing homes specialised in dementia were more depended in activities of daily living (ADL) and had more often defined dementia diagnosis than those living in an ordinary nursing homes. Less number of older people per ward and higher staff ratio were found in specialised nursing homes or group dwellings compared to ordinary nursing homes. Preliminary results indicated that low rate of care quality was associated with dependency in ADL and living in group dwelling.

    Conclusion: The dementia diagnosis is more often made in nursing homes specialized in dementia. When improving care quality in nursing homes it is important to consider the inhabitants dependency of ADL.

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