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  • 1.
    Chan, Derwin
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Human Development, The Education University of Hong Kong, New Territories, Hong Kong, China; The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China & Faculty of Education and Human Development, The Education University of Hong Kong, New Territories, Hong Kong, China & The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China & Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Stenling, Andreas
    University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand & Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yusainy, Cleoputri
    Department of Psychology, Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia.
    Hikmiah, Ziadatul
    Department of Psychology, Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hagger, Martin
    University of California, Merced, CA, United States & Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Rhodes, Ryan
    Health and Physical Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.
    Beauchamp, Mark
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Consistency tendency and the theory of planned behavior: a randomized controlled crossover trial in physical activity2020In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 665-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study examined the effects of consistency tendency on the predictive power of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in relation to physical activity behavior.

    Methods: In this randomized controlled cross-over trial, we recruited 770 undergraduate students from Indonesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. Participants completed physical activity versions of TPB measures at T1 (baseline) and T2 (post 1 week), and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at T3 (post 1 month). At T1 and T2, the TPB questions were either presented in ensemble-order (i.e., consistency tendency supressed) or alternate-order (i.e., consistency tendency facilitated).

    Results: The parameter estimates of the model (CFI > .92, TLI > .90, SRMR < .08, RMSEA < .08) aligned with the tenets of TPB. As compared to ensemble-order, a TPB measured in alternate-order yielded stronger cross-sectional relationships, but this pattern did not appear in the prospective relationships in TPB (i.e., intention/perceived behavioral control and behavior).

    Conclusions: Consistency tendency inflated the factor correlations of cross-sectionally measured TPB variables, but the inflation was not observed in the prospective prediction of behavior. Health psychology questionnaires with items presented in ensemble order may represent a viable means of reducing the confounding effect of consistency tendency. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 2.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sweden | University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Höglind, Sten
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden | Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study2021In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 43-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate (a) if daily physical activity at the within-person level is related to four different core affects the same evening, (b) if core affects in the evening predict physical activity the following day, and (c) if physical activity predicts core affects the following day.

    Design: A total of 166 university students were asked to complete the affect and physical activity measures once a day (in the evening), for seven days. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to investigate the relations within days and across days between the core affects and physical activity.

    Main outcome measures: Core affects and physical activity.

    Results: Physical activity had positive within-day associations with pleasant-activated and pleasant-deactivated core affects and a negative within-day association with unpleasant-deactivated affective responses. There were, however, no statistically significant relations between core affects and physical activity across days.

    Conclusion: These results highlight that the measurement interval might be an important factor that influences the association between core affects and physical activity behaviors. © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 3.
    Kritz, Marlene
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; University Of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Mullan, Barbara
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Stathi, Afroditi
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Curtin University, Perth, Australia; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    How can older peer leaders best support motivation for walking in physically inactive older adults? A self-determination theory perspective2023In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 38, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We aimed to determine what older adults perceive to be need-supportive behaviours of peer walk leaders, drawing primarily from Self-Determination Theory (SDT). Design: Experienced peer leaders (n = 13; Mage = 73.23, SD = 6.55) and walkers (n = 17; Mage = 72.88, SD = 5.79) were recruited from existing walking groups. Individuals who expressed an interest in becoming a peer leader (n = 18; Mage = 72.72, SD = 4.99) or walker (n = 20; Mage = 78.90, SD = 10.45) were recruited from retirement villages. Main Outcome Measures: We conducted semi-structured interviews to identify leader behaviours that support autonomy, competence, and relatedness and analysed the data using framework analysis. Results: We identified eight main themes: eliciting walker interest, acknowledging and adapting to walkers’ requirements, ensuring walkers feel comfortable, cared for, and socially integrated, supporting walker confidence, and promoting success experiences. Inexperienced leaders differed from other sub-groups in what they perceived to be supportive behaviours. Conclusion: Future peer leaders could use the identified behaviours to help older adults feel motivated during group walks. New peer leaders can be educated about potential differences between what they describe as supportive and what walkers and experienced leaders perceive as need-supportive behaviours. © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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