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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Faculty of Nursing Science, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Health predicting factors in a general population over an eight-year period in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 6, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many factors are proposed to be associated with health-related quality of life. Knowledge of health factors associated to development of a good health-related quality of life could be of use in clinical practice and public health work. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health factors and health-related quality of life at baseline and in an eight-year follow up in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain in a cohort from a general population.

    Methods: The study was designed as a longitudinal study in a Swedish general population (N = 1 849) with a postal questionnaire at baseline 1995 and at follow up 2003. Subjects were divided into two groups, according to their response about chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and suggested health factors were estimated by OR and 95% CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions, with adjustment for all health factors, age, sex and baseline SF-36 values.

    Results: Although subjects without chronic musculoskeletal pain reported better health-related quality of life than subjects with chronic pain, similar health factors were found to be associated to higher scores in SF-36 at baseline and predicted a better outcome in the eight-year follow up. The most consistent finding was a better health outcome in the eight-year follow up for subjects that were feeling rested after sleep. Other factors that in some aspects predicted a better outcome were belonging to higher socioeconomic group, being a native Swede, having emotional support, having good sleep structure, never being or being a former smoker, and regularly drinking alcohol.

    Conclusion: The most important health factor in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain was feeling rested after sleep, but also emotional support, sleep structure, smoking and alcoholic habits appears to be important components. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with painful musculoskeletal disorders. Since several health factors are common in both subjects with and without pain there could be a common strategy to be formed in public health programmes.

  • 2.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kadrija, Ibadete
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Brunt, David
    Institutionen för Hälsa och Vårdvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Minneapolis-Manchester quality of life-youth form and adolescent form2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has become important to measure long-term effects and quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. The Minneapolis- Manchester Quality of Life (MMQL) instrument has been proven to better capture the quality of life (QoL) perspective of health than other instruments. The instrument has age appropriate versions and is therefore favourable for longitudinal studies of QoL of children surviving from cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of MMQL-Youth Form and the Adolescent Form focusing on: 1) face and content validity 2) the internal consistency and 3) the test-retest reliability. Methods: The sample consisted of 950 pupils (11–16years old) from 7 schools in the western Sweden who completed the questionnaire. For the test-retest evaluation 230 respondents completed the questionnaire two weeks later. Results: Face and content validity was supported and internal consistency was found to be acceptable for the total scale for both the MMQL-Youth Form (8–12years of age) and the Adolescent Form (13–20years of age). Test-retest reliability for the MMQL-Youth Form was moderate for 50% of the items and good for the remaining. For the MMQL-Adolescent Form the test-retest showed moderate or good agreement for 80% of the items and fair for 20%. Conclusions: The result indicated that the Swedish version of the MMQLYouth Form and Adolescent Form was valid and reliable in a sample of healthy children in a Swedish context. It is recommended to test the instrument among diverse samples of children such as survivors of childhood cancer in order to validate its usefulness in research and clinical settings. © 2013 Einberg et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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