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  • 1.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Associations between general self efficacy, barriers to care and self-reported mental illness—a population-based study2010In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. 69-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Mental illness is an increasing health problem globally. However, many individuals do not seek health care although evidence-based care is available. Research has shown that self efficacy is associated with various health outcomes and it is of importance to investigate if it also is associated mental illness. Early detection promotes recovery and decreases suicide risk.

    Aim

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether low levels of self efficacy is associated with a higher degree of mental illness and whether level of self-efficacy influence health seeking behaviour.

    Methods

    This is a cross-sectional study based on data from the Health Assets study, with data collected in 2008 in West Sweden. The study population is a randomly selected population sample of 4027 individuals, aged 18–65 years. Data collection was done by a postal questionnaire and the response rate was 50.4%. Bi-and multivariate analyses were employed to investigate associations and results were stratified on sex, age, civil status, education and social support.

    Results

    A total number of 1361 (36%) out of 3811 individuals answered ‘Yes’ on the question ‘Have you ever felt so mentally ill that you had (felt a need) to seek care’. A total of 33% of the women answering yes were found in the lowest quartile of the general self efficacy scale, 20% in the highest quartile. Corresponding figures for men were 30 and 23% respectively. The most common reason stated for not seeking health care was a belief that the mental health problem would disappear by itself. Others reasons mentioned were beliefs that health care would not help, they did not know were to go or they felt ashamed for showing others they suffered from mental illness.

    Conclusion

    Mental illness is a serious health problem and access to care needs to be improved. Health promotion should also include individual traits/characteristics such as self efficacy and health-seeking behaviour.

  • 2.
    Baigi, Amir
    et al.
    Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The association between socio-economic status and chest pain, focusing on self-rated health in a primary health care area of Sweden2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 420-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: The study objective was to determine, first, the association between men's and women's chest pain and their socio-economic status (occupation, smoking) and, secondly, the association between their socio-economic status and self-rated health, in a primary health care area. Design and setting: A population-based cross-sectional survey was made in a primary health care area of Sweden. Primarily based on occupation according to Swedish standards, 4,238 men and women were divided into two socio-economic groups; blue-collar and white-collar workers. Methods: Odds ratios with 95% Cl were calculated by multivariate logistic regression, controlling for the variable age as confounding factor. Student's t-test was used to compare self-rated health, and the chi (2)-test to determine any difference in smoking habits between the two groups. Main results: Both male and female blue-collar workers showed significantly more chest pain when excited than white-collar workers. In six of eight health indices, they also reported significantly worse self-rated health than the white-collar workers. Conclusions: These findings show that there are socio-economic inequalities in self-reported chest pain. Furthermore, socio-economic status has a major influence on self-rated health, acting across the working life of both sexes.

  • 3.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bergh, Håkan
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Motivational interviewing as method in health promotion practice: A Swedish study2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 207-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Science of Theory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sager, Morten
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Science of Theory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Expertise and post-normal science in the development of the Swedish sickness certification decision-support tool2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 2, no Suppl. 2, p. 98-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In Sweden, large variations were identified in sick-leave duration also in episodes with the same diagnoses. A decision support was developed to ensure more uniform assessment of sick leave. The present qualitative study aimed at examining the process of construction and development of the new decision support.

    Methods

    Qualitative analyses of data from interviews and documents were performed. Participants (n = 15) in in-depth interviews were medical and insurance experts from the Social Insurance Agency involved in the development of the decision-support. Interviews with the medical experts focused on how well their specific medical field of expertise fitted the format suggested for the decision support and how a ‘‘standard patient’’ looked like in their clinical everyday work. For both groups of interviewees, issues regarding assessment of work capacity were discussed. The documentary analysis was done reading investigations, memos, reports and minutes. Themes identified in the interviews were compared with the overall documentary analysis and constituted the basis for an epistemic analysis.

    Results

    The analyses showed that the decision-support was developed under a tight schedule and with strict templates for its format. The decision support was built around diagnostic categories and a majority of the experts that were used were specialized in medicine. A difficulty in the process was according to participants to produce standardised medical assessments of how a particular illness was expected to affect patients’ work capacity rather than how the illness affected the patient. The evidential basis for such assessments was scant. Findings show that conditions that were not somatic or could not be ‘measured objectively’ proved extra problematic, since much of the assessment in these situations hinges on physicians’ experience-based expertise combined with their understanding of the circumstances of individual patients.

    Conclusion

    The analysis indicates that ‘work capacity’ does not fall squarely within the remit of medical expertise, but is an example of ‘post-normal science’ that requires a broad range of experts from different fields both inside and outside of science coming together to pool their knowledge and build new expertise.

  • 5.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    et al.
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Kristina
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lena
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petersson, Eva-Lisa
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The impact of health problems in sickness absence might be underestimated in Sweden2010In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. 228-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the welfare systems including the sickness insurance scheme are ongoing in several countries, and better knowledge on the extent of health problems in sickness absence seems needed. The overall aim of this cross sectional study was to assess and compare self-rated health, common symptoms and mental well-being in two samples of incident sick-leave cases with the general population. The study was performed in Sweden, 2008, and three samples of individuals aged 19–64 years were selected. The final study populations consisted of 3310 consecutive new employer reported sick-leave cases, 498 consecutive new self-reported sick-leave cases and 4027 individuals from a random general population sample. A mailed questionnaire was distributed. Validated questions and instruments on health and demographic data was analysed in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Poor self-rated health, high levels of symptoms and low mental well-being was reported by a significantly higher proportion in the two sick-leave samples compared with the general population. In logistic regressions with the generalpopulation as reference we adjusted for age, income, occupational class and current sick-leave. The fully adjusted OR for poor self-rated health, high levels of symptoms and low mental well-being respectively were 1.54 (95% confidence intervals 1.24–1.91), 1.95 (1.54–2.48) and 1.41 (1.11–1.79) among the employer reported male sick-leave cases and 1.94 (1.34–2.82), 1.76 (1.14–2.70) and 2.11 (1.40–3.17) among self reported male sick-leave cases. Corresponding figures for women were 1.80 (1.56–2.08), 1.42 (1.22–1.66) and 1.21 (1.03–1.43) and 2.10 (1.60–2.75), 1.97 (1.1–2.57) and 1.78 (1.35–2.36). Differences in health problems between the groups remained significant in the fully adjusted model. We conclude that sick-listed individuals have a higher burden of illness also after control for current sick leave than the general population. Consequence analyses of more rigorous legislation and increased demands need to take this into account.

  • 6.
    Källstrand-Ericson, Jeanette
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Baigi, amir
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Buer, Nina
    Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Perceived functional  visual impairment and risk of falling in a non-institutional elderly population in Sweden2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 106-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lydell, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Söderbom, Arne
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health promotion – future challenges in occupational health services. A mixed method approach2015In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 3, p. 355-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Occupational health services (OHS) are often working from a pathogenic perspective, seeing the customer as a patient. To meet the future challenges in a more holistic way there is a need of changing perspective. The occupational health services must promote health and prevent the problems before they appear.

    The study will answer the following questions: What experiences do the employees at an OHS have regarding their daily work? What experiences do the employers have regarding the OHS? What challenges do the employers see for the future and how can OHS be supportive?

    Methods

    This study included a three-stage process; the first stage included qualitative data from diaries, collected during one and a half year, interviews with occupational health professionals (n = 12) in an occupational health service center as well as focus groups interviews with managers of the customer companies affiliated to the occupational health service center. The second stage was a quantitative part with a questionnaire to managers of the customer companies (n = 116) and the third stage will be a review of existing literature in occupational health.

    Results

    Findings from stage 1, 2 and 3 are presented in three categories:

    Balancing complex situations was e.g. about the difficulty between loyalty to the client and the company's profits and also that major changes in the workplace are leading to difficulties for many employees. Working with a proactive approach was e.g. about new approaches that are needed in the OHS. Collaborate internal and external showed e.g that more collaboration between companies, OHS and external actors was of importance.

    Conclusions

    • a. Change and apply new perspectives in occupational health services.

    • b. There is clearly a need for research in OHS using a comprehensive approach to health promotion.

    • c. There must be interactions between the occupational health services and the management of the customer companies for designing new proactive health promotion interventions.

    Key messages

    • It is significant for occupational health centers taking into account the importance of balancing complex situations, having a proactive approach and collaborating in working life

    • To change perspective and approaches in occupational health centers are of importance in order to meet future challenges in working life

    © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Morgan, Antony
    et al.
    Glasgow Caledonian University, London, United Kingdom.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Social capital as a theory of change for young people’s health: a scoping review preliminary findings2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 3, p. 85-85, article id ckx187.217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Falkenberg.
    Baigi, Amir
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Hearth Care Halland, Falkenberg.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Hearth Care Halland, Falkenberg.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    The prevalence of the use of androgenic anabolic steroids by adolescents in a county of Sweden2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 195-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The prevalence of the use of androgenic anabolic steroids has been poorly studied in Europe. This study was undertaken to examine the prevalence of the misuse - the non-medical use - of androgenic anabolic steroids among adolescents in a county of Sweden.

    Methods

    The total population of 16 and 17 year old male and female adolescents in a county on the south-west coast of Sweden was studied. The investigation was done by an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. The questionnaire was completed by 5,827 pupils and statistically analysed. The participation rate was 95%.

    Results

    Among male adolescents 16 acid 17 years old, 3.6% and 2.8% had misused androgenic anabolic steroids, respectively, These male adolescents had also misused alcohol, growth hormones and narcotic drugs more than the steroid hormone non-users. Among female adolescents there was no recorded misuse of these drugs (0.0%),

    Conclusions

    The misuse of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality in both small and large municipalities in Sweden. The prevalence figures are higher among 16 year old compared to 17 year old male adolescents. There is an association between this drug misuse and other substance misuse such as narcotic drugs, Female adolescents do not misuse steroid hormones. The findings indicate the need for preventive work among male adolescents in order to induce adolescents not to start misusing androgenic anabolic steroids.

  • 10.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Participation in pediatric day surgery, what it means for children and parents2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 1, p. 407-408Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sect Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, K
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hensing, G
    Sahlgrens Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sect Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Is there an association between strain in domestic work and sickness absence: a study of employed women in Sweden2007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 2, p. 232-232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sickness absence in women—what are the associations with domestic work?2008In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no Suppl. 1, p. 36-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Issue

    One explanation put forward for women’s higher sickness absence, is they often have the main responsibility for the domestic work. Studies on the association between health and ‘double burden’ and ‘interactions between paid and unpaid work’, respectively are common. Few have addressed the association with sickness absence and the specific impact of domestic work.

    Description of the problem

    Compared with paid work, measures on exposure to domestic work are scarce and less developed. In previous studies on association between domestic work and sickness absence, different measures, such as number and age of children at home, responsibility for household work, working hours in domestic work, and interference between paid and unpaid work have been used. Results are inconsistent and improved measures have been asked for. In a study on employed women in Sweden, a multidimensional perspective of domestic work was used in constructing different measures of domestic work. No associations were found between sickness absence and ‘domestic job strain’. ‘caring activities related to adults’, ‘caring activities related to children’ and ‘domestic life events or difficulties’ were associated with higher risk of sick-leave spells from 8 to 30 days. Lacking ‘domestic work equity and marital satisfaction’ was associated with a higher risk of a new sick-leave spell during the study period, while ‘parental responsibility’ was associated with lower risk of sick-leave.

    Lessons learned

    Domestic work combines life domains and work tasks with very different meaning and content. A multidimensional assessment of domestic work contributed to identify specific aspects of domestic work that might affect women’s sickness absence, and that might be possible to prevent. Future research needs to improve measures focusing both general and specific domestic work aspects as well as contextual factors so that the complexity of domestic work becomes better defined and operationalized.

  • 13.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Department of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Alexandersson, K
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hensing, G
    Department of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Household work and self-rated health: a comparison of two different models in a study of gainfully employed women in Sweden2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no Suppl 1, p. 84-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gender differences in self-reported health - the significance of inequality in domestic work2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no Suppl. 4, article id ckz187.201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gender difference in health is an important public health issue. Although biological factors contribute, social processes and living conditions create, maintain and exacerbate health differences between women and men. The aim of this study was to examine if lack of equality in domestic work contributes to the explanation of gender differences in self-reported mental well-being, common symptoms and persistent illness.

    Methods: Population based questionnaire data on co-habiting women and men in Sweden, aged 19-64 years (n = 2666), was used. Division of planning and performing domestic work, satisfaction with division of domestic work and equality in partner relationship, were analysed in relation to health outcomes using binary logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age, income, country of birth, occupational class, weekly hours in paid work and number of children.

    Results: Women, compared to men, showed higher odds (OR) for having low mental well-being, OR 1.35 (1.07-1.70), > 7 common symptoms, OR 1.98 (CI 1.59-2.46) and ≥ 1 persistent illness, OR 1.25 (CI 1.06-1.47). When equal partner relationship and planning and performing domestic work were included in the regression, the ORs for mental well-being and persistent illness slightly weakened and decreased to non-significance when satisfaction with division of domestic work were analysed, OR 1.14 (0.99-1.44) and OR 1.18 (0.99-1.39) respectively. Corresponding ORs for common symptoms were almost unchanged throughout the analysis.

    Conclusions: Satisfaction with division of domestic work contributed to explanation of gender differences in persistent illness and notably to differences in mental well-being.

    Key messages:

    • Inequality in domestic work could contribute to explanation of gender difference in health.

    • Satisfaction in division of domestic work is of specific relevance in gender difference in mental health.

    © Staland Nyman & Hensing 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Spak, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Multiple roles, health and sickness absence – A five year follow-up study on women in Sweden2011In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 21, no Suppl. 1, p. 275-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Labour force participation among women in Sweden is high and many women are combining a professional role with a role as partner and parent. The effect of multiple social roles on women’s health is thus an important public health issue. Multiple social roles and health is also likely to be influenced by cultural and social contexts and welfare support. Two contrasting hypotheses have been put forward; ‘role strain’ i.e. increased demands and conflicts with stress as a result and ‘role enhancement’ i.e. increased access to benefits with positive influence on health. However, few prospective studies have been performed and the aim of this study was to analyse longitudinal associations between changes in number of social roles over a five year follow-up in relation to self-rated physical health, psychological wellbeing, psychiatric disorder and long-term sickness absence.

    Methods

    Data was derived from a population-based longitudinal cohort. Women with an occupational role (gainfully employed or students) born in 1935, 1945, 1955, 1965, 1970 and 1975 (N =532) were interviewed with a five year follow-up. Occupational, partner and parental roles were assessed. Self-rated information on physical health, psychological wellbeing and long term sickness absence was used, while information on psychiatric disorder was based on structured diagnostic questions at the interviews according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-III-R and DSM-IV. Analyses were performed by multivariate logistic regression.

    Results

    An increased number of social roles was associated with lower odds for poor psychological well-being, OR 0.43 (CI 0.26–0.72), and for psychiatric disorders, OR 0.67 (0.45–0.99) at follow-up when adjusted for age, socio-economic position, alcohol dependence and abuse and health at baseline. No significant associations were found in relation to poor physical self-rated health and long-term sickness absence and changes in social roles.

    Conclusions

    This study contributed to the knowledge on longitudinal associations between multiple roles and health. The result indicated that an increased number of social roles were positive in relation to women’s mental health and gave to some extent support for the role enhancement hypothesis.

  • 16.
    Staland-Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group. Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Houkes, I.
    Social Medicine, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    de Rijk, A.
    Social Medicine, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Verdonk, P.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hensing, G.
    Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Indicators of gender equality in domestic work and sickness absence – Findings among cohabiting women and men in Sweden2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no Suppl. 2, p. 342-342Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Morgan, Antony
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The association between social capital on health quality of life among adolescents2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 3, p. 365-365, article id ckx189.162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hutton, Katrin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Self-reported objective and subjective indicators of socio-economic status and mental health between two adolescent age groups in Sweden2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no Suppl. 2, p. 31-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research has shown that socio-economic status (SES) contributes to the mental health of adolescents; however the causality of this effect is debated. SES among adolescents is methodologically difficult to assess and SES indicators differ between age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate objective and subjective indicators of SES and their relation to mental health in two adolescent age groups.

    Methods: This is a cross-sectional study based on data collected by self- report questionnaires from 11-13 years old n = 457 (younger age group) and 14-16 years old n = 462 (older age group) adolescents at schools in a rural town in south western Sweden. The Family Affluence Scale (FAS) (high, medium, low) and Perceived Wealth (PW) (high, medium, low) were used as measurement for objective and subjective socio-economic wealth. The domain psychological functioning health from the Minneapolis Manchester Quality of Life instrument (MMQL-PF) (continuous variable) was used to measure self-rated mental health.

    Results: When measuring SES using the two different scales, the proportion of adolescents in the younger age group stating a low SES was 28.1% using FAS and 12.1% using PW. In the older age group the proportion was 21.4% in FAS and 15.5% in PW. There was a positive significant relation between PW and self-rated mental health in both age groups, by 0.112 (95% CI.0.024; 0.199) in the younger age group and by 0.140 (95% CI.0.051; 0.223) in the older age group. This relation was not seen regarding FAS.

    Conclusion: In the search for SES’ relation to mental health, different aspects of adolescents’ socio-economic conditions should be considered. In this study we suggest that the subjective experiences of adolescents regarding the wealth of the family might be a stronger indicator of SES influencing mental health. This might be taken into consideration when planning for public health interventions and effective prevention programs suited for adolescents with lower SES. 

    Key message:

    • In the search for SES’ relation to mental health, different aspects of adolescents’ socio-economic conditions should be considered.

    © The Author 2014

  • 19.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Girls and boys strategies to handle and cope with school-related stress2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 1, p. 221-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A trend of increased stress and deteriorating mental health of adolescents is a global challenge (Currier et al, 2012). Research shows that many adolescents report high levels of stress associated with an increased focus on school performance (Moknes et al, 2014). These demands generally have a stronger impact on girl’s health (Låftman & Modig, 2013) due to context and social construction of norms, values and beliefs about femininity and masculinity (Connell, 2002; Butler, 1999). The aim was to get a deeper understanding of girls and boys perceptions of how they handle demands and school-related stress.

    Methods

    This study has an explorative design and was analyzed by qualitative content analysis described by Graneheim and Lundman (2004). The participants were 42 adolescents 15 years old, interviewed in five focus groups, dived by gender from five randomly selected schools. Two additional gender mixed focus groups with 14 adolescents 15 years old, were recruited from two of the randomly selected schools.

    Results

    The results show that girls and boys handle school-related stress by using similar strategies, but in different ways. Girls express that they have to prioritize to deselect activities they use to do to handle demands from school, and boys prioritize their own activities to obtain strength to cope with demands. Girls often think about their future while boys more often live in present time, and don’t worry so much about the future. Girls receive social support and recovery from friends and family, while boys do various activities with their friends and family to get energy.

    Conclusions

    This study shows that girls and boys used different strategies to handle demand and school-related stress. The results are based on adolescent’s experiences and could therefore be an important foundation for interventions that promote adolescents capabilities to cope with increasing demands and to handle school-related stress.

    Key messages:

    • This study shows that girls and boys perceived and used different strategies to handle demand and school-related stress

    • The result is an important foundation for interventions that promote adolescents capabilities to cope with increasing demands and to handle school-related stress

    © The Author 2016.

  • 20.
    Wiman, Virginia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Workplace health promotion; views from managers of small companies2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 129-129Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Workplace health promotion leads to better health, high morale, increased productivity and reduced absenteeism among employees. The role of leadership is vital when creating strategies for workplace health promotion. Small companies (less than 50 employees) have increased need for health promotion, as they often lack knowledge and resources to manage health and safety problems. Moreover, small companies have less access to occupational health service. The aim of this study was to describe how managers at small companies perceive their company as an arena for health promotion. 

    Methods: A sample of ten managers (four females) was strategically selected using maximal variation in terms of branch of industry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis comprised of both manifest and latent content and triangulation between the authors was used. 

    Results: Three main categories emerged from the analysis; sees the workplace as a possible arena, sees the opportunity to promote employees health and sees a need for external support. More in-depth analysis resulted in six subcategories. The latent content of these categories is described by the theme; Health promotion leadership in order to perceive the company as a health promotion arena. A key factor for workplace health promotion was the manager´s view of health promotion as a beneficial factor for the company. Furthermore, the managers expressed that they could promote employees´ health by organizing health promotion activities and promote a positive psychosocial work environment. The findings showed a need for easily accessible external support to assist managers in their work with health promotion. It is essential that the external support contributes with inspiration and knowledge of health promotion activities, for example by highlighting good practice from other small companies. 

    Conclusions: Using the manager´s view about the workplace as an arena for promoting health can be a step towards strategies for implementing workplace health promotion. However, for the development of healthy organizations it is necessary to have a comprehensive strategy in which employers, employees and society is pursuing the same goal.

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