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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Factors influencing nurse supervisor competence: a critical incident analysis study2005In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 231-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to identify factors related to critical incidents that influence the competence of nurse supervisors. Nurse supervisors require considerable competence in order to help supervisees to reflect on their clinical work and to interpret the needs of the patient. A qualitative approach involving the critical incident technique was used. Critical incidents were collected by means of self-reports from 25 nurse supervisors. Two main areas emerged: a professional and a personal stance. The professional stance described the nurse supervisors’ awareness of the importance of creating a secure learning environment and facilitating reflection. The supervisors structured the material and created awareness of fundamental nursing values. The second main area, personal stance, described the nurse supervisors’ behaviour when they gave the participating nurses the opportunity to work through the experiences gained in the daily provision of nursing care. Although they experienced lack of self-assurance during the supervision session, they also expressed security regarding their own performance as nurse supervisors. Nurse supervisors need to include more nursing theory and focus on the nursing process as well as being aware of their own shortcomings and resources. One way for the supervisior to scrutinize his/her actions is to discuss and examine them with a more experienced nurse supervisor colleague.

  • 2.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Löfgren, H.
    Department of Educational and Psychological Research, School of Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how a group supervision programme in nursing care influences their professional competence: a 4-year follow-up study2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to describe, after 4 years, psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how a 2-year group supervision programme within nursing care had influenced their professional competence.

    BACKGROUND: The intention of group supervision in nursing care is to understand nurses' experiences within real care settings and to structure these in a professional and personal context.

    METHODS: Ten psychiatric nurses participated in a 2-year group supervision programme. They were interviewed 4 years after the group supervision was ended. Data were analysed according to the phenomenographic method.

    FINDINGS: Six description categories emerged: a feeling of job satisfaction; gaining knowledge and competence; gaining a sense of security in nursing situations; a feeling of personal development; realizing the value of supervision; and a sense of professional solidarity.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the 4-year follow-up showed that a group supervision programme in nursing care had lasting influences on the psychiatric nurses' professional competence in the form of a pronounced professional identity and an integrated nursing care perspective. Group supervision contributes to maintaining the strength and energy needed to carry on working, which makes continuing supervision necessary.

    IMPLICATIONS: An important research implication could be to investigate the type of knowledge that ought to be developed within group supervision in nursing care.

    © 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Löfgren, H.
    Department of Educational and Psychological Research, School of Education, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how group supervision in nursing care influences their professional competence2000In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to describe, after 1 and 2 years respectively, psychiatric nurses' conceptions of how group supervision within nursing care influenced their professional competence.

    BACKGROUND: The intention of group supervision in nursing care is to understand nurses' experiences within real care settings and to structure these in a professional and personal context.

    THE STUDY: Ten psychiatric nurses participated in the group supervision. They were interviewed on two occasions: after 1 and 2 years, respectively.

    FINDINGS: The data analysis was influenced by the phenomenographic approach and provided four description categories: a feeling of job satisfaction; acquiring knowledge and competence; gaining a sense of security in nursing situations; and a feeling of personal development.

    CONCLUSIONS: In supervision, practice and theory are integrated, resulting in enhanced nursing competence among the participants. Supervision should be an integrated part of nursing work and regarded as a means of quality assurance. A long-term follow-up could give valuable proof that group supervision in nursing care has a lasting effect on nurses' professional competence.

  • 4.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Process-oriented group supervision implemented during nursing education: nurses’ conceptions 1 year after their nursing degree2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 868-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the variation in how nurses conceive process-oriented group supervision, implemented during nursing education, 1 year after their nursing degree. BACKGROUND: Process-oriented group supervision can be an effective support system for helping nursing students and nurses to reflect on their activities. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative design was chosen for the study. Conceptions were collected through interviews with 18 strategically selected Swedish nurses in 2005. RESULTS: Three descriptive categories comprising seven conceptions were emerged. Supportive actions comprised: a sense of security, belonging and encouragement. Learning actions involved: sharing and reflecting while developmental actions described: enabling professional identity and facilitating personal development. CONCLUSIONS: Process-oriented group supervision has a lasting influence on nurses' development. The possibility to reflect over new stances during nursing education was a prerequisite for the provision of high-quality care. Process-oriented group supervision can make an important contribution to nursing education. IMPLICATIONS: for Nursing Management Process-oriented group supervision provides nurses with the strength to achieve resilience to stress in their work. It may lead to autonomy as well as clarity in the nurse's professional function. This indicates the need for nurse managers to organize reflective group supervision as an integral part of the nurse's work.

  • 5.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Hinic, Hansi
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lundberg, Dag
    Dept. of Anaesthiol./Intensive Care, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pain and health-related quality of life among cancer patients in final stage of life: a comparison between two palliative care teams2003In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A two-centred descriptive study was performed in order to describe and compare pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among cancer patients, in their final stage of life. The patients were cared for by either a nurse-led palliative care team I (PCT I) or a physician-led palliative care team II (PCT II). Forty-six consecutive, stratified patients (PCT I, n = 21 and PCT II, n = 25) participated. The medical outcomes study short form 36 (SF-36) was used for evaluating HRQOL and the Pain-O-Meter for assessing pain. Patients' pain intensity, pain quality and HRQOL showed no significant difference between the two groups PCT I and PCT II. The patients from PCT I had significantly longer survival time (P = 0.017) than those from PCT II. The different composition of the teams being led by nurses or physicians is worth further research; both from the patient's and staff's viewpoint, there may also be cost-benefits worth examining.

  • 6.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Ramberg, T.
    Pain Clinic, Varberg Hospital, Varberg, Sweden.
    Davies, B.D.
    Dean of Nursing Studies, School of Nursing Studies, University of Wales, Cardi , UK.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Survey of post-operative patients' pain management1997In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although effective pain treatment is available for both cancer-related pain and acute post-operative pain, many patients suffer unnecessarily. The aim of this study was to evaluate post-operative patients' pain management. A descriptive survey study was conducted in a 460-bed acute hospital in the southwestern part of Sweden. One hundred post-operative inpatients, on their second post-operative day, took part in the study. They were consecutively selected from six surgical wards. Data were collected using an interview questionnaire designed by the American Pain Society and analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics. At the time of the interview, 29 of the patients reported moderate to severe pain. Regarding the patients' worst pain experienced during the last 24 h, 79 of them reported moderate to very severe pain. Significant correlations were found between reported poor pain relief after pain medication and high intensity of pain both within the last 24 h and at the time of the interview. Eighty-three patients were satisfied with the way nurses treated their pain, while 64 patients were satisfied with the way physicians treated their pain. However, the higher the pain intensity experienced by the patients the less satisfied they were. The fact that patients do not know what kinds of relief are available may be one reason for the patients expressing satisfaction despite being in pain, another that the patients judge the kindness of the staff rather than their way of treating the pain. The field of pain management is rapidly changing requiring professional knowledge and experience in order to ensure pain management of good quality.

  • 7.
    Jensen Lundqvist, Margareta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Axelsson, Åsa
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nurses’ perceptions of quality assurance2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe nurses’ perceptions of quality assurance. Methods: A qualitative approach using phenomenography was adopted in this study. Data were collected by open and semi-structured interviews from a strategic sample of nurses (N = 10) from a hospital in the south-west of Sweden. Findings: The nurses showed 10 different perceptions of the phenomena, which were summarized into four description categories: controlling, development, cooperation and demands. The perceptions described show that nurses can perceive quality assurance both as an asset and as a burden. Conclusion: The expressed perceptions show that nurses use quality assurance as a way of keeping a certain level of caring. It also gives nurses an opportunity for professional growth as well as a possibility for rewards. Working together as a team, even though there are different staff grades, to find joint standpoints, has a positive effect not only on qualitative assurance but also for the patient, as he/she often meets different categories during hospital stay. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Hosp Varberg, Dept Internal Med, Varberg, Sweden..
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Mats
    Vastra Vall, Dept Gen Med, Varberg, Sweden..
    Health-care professionals' documentation of wellbeing in patients following open heart surgery: a content analysis of medical records2013In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore health-care professionals' documentation of patient wellbeing in the first five months after open heart surgery. Background Open heart surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting or heart valve replacement) is an intervention aimed at relief of symptoms and increased wellbeing. It is a complex procedure with deep experiences encompassing physiological, psychological and social aspects. Health-care professionals' documentation of expressions of decreased wellbeing related to open heart surgery is an important basis for decisions and for the understanding of patients' overall health situation. Method Eighty medical records were examined by means of qualitative and quantitative methods in order to explore documentation of patient wellbeing at four points in time. The analysis was performed by content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results Documentation of physical wellbeing was dominant on all occasions, while psychological wellbeing was moderately well documented and social aspects of wellbeing were rarely documented. Conclusion The medical records did not adequately reflect the complexity of undergoing open heart surgery. Hence the holistic approach was not confirmed in health-care professionals' documentation. Implications for nursing management Managers need to support and work for a patient-centred approach in cardiac care, resulting in patient documentation that reflects patient wellbeing as a whole.

  • 9.
    Persson, Maria
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Development Unit for Primary HealthCare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Situations influencing habits in diet and exercise among nurses working night shift2006In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 414-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the investigation was to describe situations with a significant influence on healthy diet and exercise habits among nurses working night shift. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design with a Critical Incident Technique approach was used. Situations were collected by means of interviews with 27 registered/enrolled community nurses. Results: A total of 143 situations were identified comprising two main areas: coping ability at work and coping ability during leisure hours. Coping ability at work included 81 critical incidents grouped into two categories: the nurses’ diet and exercise habits were influenced by social interaction with colleagues at work and by the disruption to their circadian rhythm. Coping ability during leisure hours included 62 critical incidents grouped into two categories: the diet and exercise habits were influenced when the nurses recovered from the disruption to their circadian rhythm and when they took advantage of the freedom of action offered by night work. Conclusions: By identifying the factors that influence diet and exercise habits among nurses working night shift, strategies can be developed in order to strengthen the factors with a positive influence. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 10.
    Strandmark, K. Margaretha
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    The origin of workplace bullying: experiences from the perspective of bully victims in the public service sector2007In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 332-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Workplace bullying has attracted increased attention during the last decade due to its severe consequences on health. However, the origin of bullying has, so far, been insufficiently described.

    AIM:

    This study investigates the manner in which bullying is initiated at workplaces in the public service sector.

    METHOD:

    Twenty-two bully victims were interviewed in-depth and data were analysed according to grounded theory methodology.

    RESULTS:

    The findings of this study demonstrated that bullying was preceded by a long-standing struggle for power. This power struggle emanated from conflicts of values caused by organizational conditions, leadership styles and the involved parties' work expectations. In particular, individuals who perceived themselves as strong and competent or as vulnerable and sensitive persons were targeted in these types of power struggles.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In these cases, if values conflicts were solved, the power struggle ebbed. When values conflicts remained unsolved, the gap widened between the targeted individual and that person's opponents. Thereby, the conflict escalated and grew into one characterized by systematic and persistent bullying.

  • 11.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Central Hospital Halmstad, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Conceptions of life situation among next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of renal disease in a family is a strain on both the patient and the next-of-kin, affecting their life situations. Surprisingly, few studies dealing with the ways that the next-of-kin experience their situation are available. The aim of this study was to describe how the next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients conceive their life situation. Data were collected by interviewing 12 people who live with someone with dialysis-treated renal disease and analysed according to a qualitative method inspired by the phenomenographic approach. Six description categories of how the subjects construed their life situation emerged: a feeling of confinement; a feeling of social isolation; a feeling that the way of life has changed; a feeling of security in life; a feeling of a threatening future; and promoting health. The next-of-kin generally expressed a large degree of commitment to and concern for the sick person. In spite of their life situation having been dramatically changed, the next-of-kin described an ability to adapt. With the help of society the feelings of confinement and social isolation can be dispersed, enabling the next-of-kin to promote the health of the sick person. A suggestion for further research is to study what adaptation strategies next-of-kin use in their life situation.

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