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  • 1.
    Koinberg, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Surgery, Varberg Hospital, Varberg, Sweden & Division of Nursing, Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Engholm, G.-B
    Department of Oncology, Örebro, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmberg, L.
    Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurse-led follow-up on demand or by a physician after breast cancer surgery: A randomised study2004In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of routine follow-up with frequent visits to a breast cancer specialist - both in terms of detection of recurrence and patient satisfaction - has been questioned. The aim of this study was to compare nurse-ted follow-up on demand versus physician follow-up after breast cancer treatment with regards to patients’ well-being, satisfaction, access to medical care and medical safety. Two hundred and sixty-four consecutively selected women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, classified as UICC stage I or stage II, were randomised to follow-up at two hospitals in Sweden, either by routine medical follow-up, the physician group (PG, n = 131), or on demand by a specialist nurse, the nurse group (NG, n = 133). Measures were done at baseline and twice a year over a period of 5 years by means of a questionnaire containing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), and the Satisfaction and Accessibility (SaaC) scale. Number of contacts with the health care services, number of diagnostic procedures, and time to recurrence or death were monitored. The ratings of HAD and SaaC did not show any statistically significant differences between the groups. The levels of anxiety and depression were generally low and levels of patient satisfaction high. There were no differences between the groups concerning time to recurrence or death. This study indicates that women with breast cancer in stages I to II can be followed up by a specialist nurse with high patient satisfaction and good medical safety. © 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 2.
    Koinberg, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The usefulness of a multidisciplinary educational programme after breast cancer surgery: A prospective and comparative study2006In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 273-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to compare and evaluate a multidisciplinary educational programme with traditional follow-up visits to a physician after breast cancer surgery in terms of well-being, aspects of self-care and coping ability 1 year after diagnosis. A reduction in the intensity of follow-up after breast cancer surgery is recommended. New follow-up models are being debated and could be of interest. The study design was non-randomised and comparative. Ninety-six consecutively selected women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, classified as stage I or stage II, participated in either a multidisciplinary educational programme (n = 50), or traditional follow-up by a physician (n = 46). Three questionnaires were used: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), a study specific questionnaire regarding self-care aspects (SCA) and Sense of Coherence (SOC). With the exception of physical well-being at baseline there was no significant difference between the groups. The women in the multidisciplinary educational programme increased their physical and functional well-being (P < 0.01). The women in traditional follow-up by a physician increased their functional well-being while social/family well-being (P < 0.01) decreased over time. There was a statistically significant difference in SOC (P < 0.001) in the traditional follow-up by a physician between baseline (mean = 74.4, SD = 12.4) and the 1-year follow up (mean = 67.7, SD = 11.4). Thus, women in the traditional follow-up by a physician scored lower in the area of SOC 1 year after diagnosis. A multidisciplinary educational programme may be an alternative to traditional follow-up by a physician after breast cancer surgery, but more research is needed about the financial benefits and effectiveness of such a programme. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Sjöberg, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Creating a shielding place for children with leukaemia during sedation for intrathecal chemotherapy: A grounded theory study2020In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 44, article id 101711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Childhood cancer invades the child's daily life and has a strong influence on their living conditions and lifestyle. The treatment is an unpleasant experience and the children often perceive the treatment as worse than the actual disease. The aim of the present study was thus to explore the process of how healthcare professionals improved care for children undergoing sedation for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    Method: A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied and qualitative interviews with paediatricians (n = 2), anaesthetists (n = 2), paediatric nurses (n = 3) and nurse anaesthetists (n = 5).

    Results: The theory of creating a shielding place emerged and conceptualized the pattern of behavior of healthcare professionals throughout the procedure of sedation for intrathecal chemotherapy for pediatric leukaemia. The theory explains the core category ‘shielding’ and the process of how healthcare professionals developed strategies to resolve their main concern: a striving to reduce discomfort and suffering induced by the procedure and the treatment. These strategies, used throughout the procedure, were; de-dramatizing, de-exposing and minimizing trespassing.

    Conclusions: The theory of creating a shielding place offers a greater understanding of how healthcare professionals included the child's perspective in their work and thereby enabled a more sensitive and supportive care that had an impact on both quality of care and patient safety. The results from the study contributes with theoretical knowledge that can be used for developing evidence-based care guidelines for the procedure of sedating a child with leukaemia for intrathecal chemotherapy. © 2019 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 4.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Stigmar, Jennie
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Castor, Anders
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Support from healthcare services during transition to adulthood – Experiences of young adult survivors of pediatric cancer2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 21, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Improved survival rates of pediatric cancer have drawn attention on how to best facilitate long-term follow up and transition from pediatric to adult care. The transition process is multifactorial and necessitates the joint involvement of the patient, the family and the healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of support from healthcare services during the transition from adolescence to adulthood described by young adult survivors of pediatric cancer.

    Methods: A mixed method with a convergent parallel design was used to evaluate the experiences of receiving support from healthcare services (eg pediatric oncology and pediatric clinic) during transition from adolescence to adulthood described by young adult survivors of pediatric cancer (n = 213) in a nation wide cross-sectional survey.

    Results: A quantitative assessment of the experienced extent and satisfaction of support from healthcare services to handle physical, mental and social changes to continue life after the disease showed that a majority of the participants had received insufficient support. The qualitative analysis indicated a need for equal roles in healthcare to promote participation, a need to manage and process consequences of the disease, and a need for continuous support.

    Conclusions: During transition to adulthood, there's a need for a personalized care plan that takes a holistic approach towards supporting the young cancer survivor in managing life in the best way. Identifying and handling the individual needs of pediatric cancer survivors is important for providing the resources and support required to increase the likelihood of successful transition to adulthood. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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