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  • 1.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Patients' experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing.

    Methods: This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results: The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process of lifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged, the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions: This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self-reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed. © 2014 Brobeck et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 2.
    Bökberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Significance of quality of care for quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission: a cross-sectional study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quality of life in persons with dementia is, in large part, dependent on the quality of care they receive. Investigating both subjective and objective aspects of quality of care may reveal areas for improvement regarding their care, which information may ultimately enable persons with dementia to remain living in their own homes while maintaining quality of life. The aim of this study was to 1) describe self-reported quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission. 2) describe subjective and objective aspects of quality of care, 3) investigate the significance of quality of care for quality of life.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional interview study design was used, based on questionnaires about quality of life (QoL-AD) and different aspects of quality of care (CLINT and quality indicators). The sample consisted of 177 persons with dementia living in urban and rural areas in Skåne County, Sweden. Descriptive and comparative statistics (Mann-Whitney U-test) were used to analyse the data.

    Results

    Based upon Lawton’s conceptual framework for QoL in older people, persons with pain showed significantly lower quality of life in the dimensions behavioural competence (p = 0.026) and psychological wellbeing (p = 0.006) compared with those without pain. Satisfaction with care seemed to have a positive effect on quality of life. The overall quality of life was perceived high even though one-third of the persons with dementia had daily pain and had had a weight loss of ≥4% during the preceding year. Furthermore, 23% of the persons with dementia had fallen during the last month and 40% of them had sustained an injury when falling.

    Conclusion

    This study indicates need for improvements in home care and services for persons with dementia at risk for nursing home admission. Registered nurses are responsible for nursing interventions related to pain, patient safety, skin care, prevention of accidents, and malnutrition. Therefore, it is of great importance for nurses to have knowledge about areas that can be improved to be able to tailor interventions and thereby improve quality of care outcomes such as quality of life in persons with dementia living at home. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 3.
    Regber, Susann
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårild, Staffan
    Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson Hanse, Jan
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barriers to and facilitators of nurse-parent interaction intended to promote healthy weight gain and prevent childhood obesity at Swedish child health centers2013In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 12, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity in preschool children have increased worldwide in the past two to three decades. Child Health Centers provide a key setting for monitoring growth in preschool children and preventing childhood obesity.

    METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 nurses working at Child Health Centers in southwest Sweden in 2011 and 2012. All interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim and imported to QSR N'Vivo 9 software. Data were analyzed deductively according to predefined themes using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Findings resulted in 332 codes, 16 subthemes and six main themes. The subthemes identified and described barriers and facilitators for the prevention of childhood obesity at Child Health Centers. Main themes included assessment of child's weight status, the initiative, a sensitive topic, parental responses, actions and lifestyle patterns. Although a body mass index (BMI) chart facilitated greater recognition of a child's deviant weight status than the traditional weight-for-height chart, nurses used it inconsistently. Obesity was a sensitive topic. For the most part, nurses initiated discussions of a child's overweight or obesity.

    CONCLUSION: CHCs in Sweden provide a favorable opportunity to prevent childhood obesity because of a systematic organization, which by default conducts growth measurements at all health visits. The BMI chart yields greater recognition of overweight and obesity in children and facilitates prevention of obesity. In addition, visualization and explanation of the BMI chart helps nurses as they communicate with parents about a child's weight status. On the other hand, inconsistent use and lack of quality assurance regarding the recommended BMI chart was a barrier to prevention, possibly delaying identification of overweight or obesity. Other barriers included emotional difficulties in raising the issue of obesity because it was perceived as a sensitive topic. Some parents deliberately wanted overweight children, which was another specific barrier. Concerned parents who took the initiative or responded positively to the information about obesity facilitated prevention activities.

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