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  • 1.
    Aronsen-Torp, Jenny
    et al.
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Berggren, Vanja
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Somali Women's Experiences of Cooking and Meals after Immigration to Sweden2013Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 146-159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elucidates Somali women's experiences of cooking and meals after immigration to Sweden. Six Somali women participated in repeated focus group interviews. Content analysis of the interviews resulted in four themes: change in routines and content of the daily meals, changed experiences related to cooking and shopping for groceries, the social dimensions in food-related occupations, and change of identity and roles. According to the women, variety of factors related to their life in Sweden had led to changes in their food occupations and meals: environmental changes, societal factors and the fact that the women secured employment. Although their new focus on employment led to altered responsibility and time for the cooking, foodrelated occupations remained important for the creation of identity and the maintenance of the family. This study may inform the development of strategies to restrict the negative impacts of immigration on Somali women's health. Future research will increase understandings of the relationships between food-related occupations and women's roles, identity and health. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Temporal patterns of daily occupations related to older adults' health in northern Sweden2014Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 127-145Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify characteristics of temporal patterns of daily occupations that could be related to high and low subjective health among older adults in Northern Sweden. A cross-sectional design imprinted by time-geographic methodology was used and participants 70 years and older were purposively selected and divided into groups of high and low health using the SoC-29 and SF-36 questionnaires. Daily occupations data were registered and analysed using VISUAL Time-PAcTS and related to health conditions using SPSS. The results showed that the participants in the high- and low-health groups showed similar patterns of participation in occupations during the 24-hour sequences describing their daily routines. Some differences in patterns of frequency and duration of occupations were shown between health groups during the 24-hour sequences as well as within six intervals. The low-health group showed higher frequencies and longer durations for “care for oneself” and “reflection and recreation” occupations and lower for “house-keeping” and “procure and prepare food” occupations compared to the high-health groups. There were few significant differences between the high- and low-health groups' mean durations for occupations. The results of this study could contribute to the support and assistance of occupations of older adults in society. © 2014 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 3.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    JOS Special Issue: Occupational Science in Europe2012Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 2s. 91-92Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Time use in relation to valued and satisfying occupations among people with persistent mental illness: Exploring occupational balance2010Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 17, nr 4, s. 231-238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how temporal occupational patterns, operationalized as time use and daily rhythm, are related to occupational balance, in terms of the value and satisfaction that people with persistent mental illness derive from daily occupations. The respondents, 103 individuals visiting an outpatient psychosis unit, completed a time-use diary and questionnaires targeting occupational value and satisfaction. Spending more total time in non-rest occupations (TTNR), in the categories of self-care/maintenance, work/education and play/leisure, was related to perceiving more concrete value, such as making something or learning new things. TTNR was also related to symbolic and self-reward value and to having satisfying daily occupations. A subgroup with a daily rhythm that meant being active during the day and sleeping at night time perceived more symbolic value and greater satisfaction with their daily occupations than another characterized by low activity during the day and having turned the clock around by mostly sleeping and resting during the day. Temporal occupational patterns seemed important for perceived occupational value and satisfaction with daily occupations, seen as facets of occupational balance, and a spiral type of relationship was assumed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 5.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Levels of Complexity in Patterns of Daily Occupations: Relationship to Women's Well-Being2006Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 27-36Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study builds on a previous study of the everyday occupations of 100 women who worked at home and in the paid workforce. Their pattern of daily occupations was depicted using time-occupation graphs inspired by the time geography method, whereby the women’s pattern of occupations were categorised and clustered according to complexity. For each woman, the level of complexity was operationalised as the frequency of shifting between three categories of occupation (main, hidden, and unexpected) and sleep, along with the frequency of unexpected occupations and whether shifts in type of occupation were concentrated in limited parts of the day, e.g., the mornings. The study had two aims. First, to test the hypothesis that among women who work at home and in the paid workforce, those with low-complex patterns of daily occupations would rate their health and well-being higher than women having medium-complex patterns. As well, those with medium-complex patterns would rate their health and well-being better than women with highcomplex patterns. Secondly, the study aimed to investigate differences among these subgroups in relation to sociodemographic factors. The hypothesis was partly confirmed. Increasing complexity was associated with lower levels of self-rated health, but not with lower levels of sense of coherence and well-being. With respect to sociodemographic factors, the women in the three subgroups differed in terms of level of education. The results tentatively confirm theoretical assumptions of a link between patterns of daily occupations and experiences of health, and provide an incentive for further research on this relationship. © 2006, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för informationsteknologi, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Recognition of Similarities: A Methodological Approach to Analysing and Characterising Patterns of Daily Occupations2004Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 3-13Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proposed that it should be possible to identify patterns if daily occupations that promote health or cause illness. This study aimed to develop and to evaluate a process for analysing and characterising subjectively perceived patterns of daily occupations, by describing patterns as consisting if main, hidden, and unexpected occupations. Yesterday diaries describing one day if 100 working married mothers were collected through interviews. The diaries were transformed into time-and-occupation graphs. An analysis based on visual interpretation of the patterns was performed. The graphs were grouped into the categories low, medium, or high complexity. In order to identify similarities the graphs were then compared both pair-wise and group-wise. Finally, the complexity and similarities perspectives were integrated, identifying the most typical patterns of daily occupations representing low, medium, and high complexity. Visual differences in complexity were evident. In order to validate the Recognition of Similarities (ROS) process developed, a measure expressing the probability if change was computed. This probability was found to differ statistically significantly between the three groups, supporting the validity of the ROS process. © 2004, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meaningfulness in daily occupations among individuals with persistent mental illness2008Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 15, nr 1, s. 27-35Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how people with persistent mental illness who work or study, attend a community‐based activity centre or have no regular activities, experience and describe the meaningfulness of their daily occupations. Data were gathered from 102 randomly selected individuals who were interviewed regarding their daily occupations and perceived meaningfulness using a ‘yesterday activity diary’. Content analysis revealed five main themes of meaningfulness: 1) Connection with others and the world around them, 2) Enjoyment and fun in life, 3) Being productive and having a sense of achievement, 4) Being occupied and having routines and projects in the stream of time and 5) Taking care of oneself to maintain health. Their connections, enjoyment and fun, and taking care of oneself were the aspects of meaningfulness that occurred most frequently. Participants who worked or studied more frequently identified connections, and made fewer statements about taking care of their health. The findings contribute to the knowledge of perceived meaningfulness in daily occupation, showing that despite different occupational structures and settings, all themes of meaningfulness were represented in the three groups. Thus, people with persistent mental illness create and find meaning within their daily occupations, although the occupations that generate these aspects of meaningfulness may differ. Copyright © 2018 Informa UK Limited

  • 8.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meaningfulness in daily occupations among individuals with persistent mental illness2008Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 15, nr 1, s. 27-35Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how people with persistent mental illness who work or study, attend a community-based activity centre or have no regular activities, experience and describe the meaningfulness of their daily occupations. Data were gathered from 102 randomly selected individuals who were interviewed regarding their daily occupations and perceived meaningfulness using a ‘yesterday activity diary’. Content analysis revealed five main themes of meaningfulness: 1) Connection with others and the world around them, 2) Enjoyment and fun in life, 3) Being productive and having a sense of achievement, 4) Being occupied and having routines and projects in the stream of time and 5) Taking care of oneself to maintain health. Their connections, enjoyment and fun, and taking care of oneself were the aspects of meaningfulness that occurred most frequently. Participants who worked or studied more frequently identified connections, and made fewer statements about taking care of their health. The findings contribute to the knowledge of perceived meaningfulness in daily occupation, showing that despite different occupational structures and settings, all themes of meaningfulness were represented in the three groups. Thus, people with persistent mental illness create and find meaning within their daily occupations, although the occupations that generate these aspects of meaningfulness may differ. © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    The Parker Institute, Hospital Fredriksberg, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark & Institute of Rehabilitation and Nutrition, Department of Occupational Therapy, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Experience of Occupational Deprivation in an Asylum Centre: The Narratives of Three Men2013Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 20, nr 3, s. 212-223Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations and a profound sense of occupational deprivation. One of the participants had been subjected to torture and he experienced occupational deprivation to a greater extent. The findings suggest that further research should include exposure to torture as a key component when examining the occupational deprivation of asylum seekers. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 10.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Vårdalinstitutet and the Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Department of Technology and Social Change, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Shared patterns of daily occupations among parents of children Aged 4-6 years old with obesity2012Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, nr 3, s. 241-257Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing and is associated with how families manage their daily occupations. Previous studies suggest that it should be possible to identify patterns of daily occupations that promote health and prevent illness. However, it is unknown how family members' patterns are shared. This study aimed at gaining knowledge about parents' shared patterns of daily occupations. Thirty parents enrolled in a randomized controlled trial involving parents of children aged 4–6 years old with obesity, were included. The study used a mixed methods design. Data from time-geographical diaries describing daily occupations on one ordinary weekday were collected. A sequential exploratory strategy design was used, with qualitative and quantitative data analysis. Four main groups of family types were identified: the togetherness focused family, the child focused family, the individual focused family and the parent-child focused family. These groups' shared patterns of daily occupations differed in terms of divisions of household work, paid work and the amount of time spent together as a family. The results highlight and generate a new understanding of how parents' shared patterns of daily occupations are shaped in families. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Health Sciences Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Health Sciences Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ecopation: connecting sustainability, glocalisation and well-being2014Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 12-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the current perspective of sustainability and explores its relation to occupation. An elaborated version of the concept of ecopation, originally developed in 2002, which melds together eco-ethics and knowledge about occupation, is used as a tool to address sustainability issues in relation to future occupations for well-being. The concept of glocalisation is introduced as a means by which to capture the interconnectedness of personal, local and global perspectives. A core proposition in the article is that doing, if guided by ecopation, could start promoting well-being on individual and population levels if it takes into account the personal as well as the local and global contexts. Current planetary economic and ecological crises and the increasing call for humane global solutions are discussed in relation to how ecopation and a deepened knowledge of the human as an occupational being, might contribute to such solutions. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 12.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Time to Reevaluate the Machine Society: Post‐industrial Ethics from an Occupational Perspective2002Ingår i: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 93-99Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the ethics underlying the occupational repertoire of the post-industrial citizen, giving attention to lifestyle phenomena such as increased tempo and quantity of occupations; manipulation of time, organisms and environments; decreases in sleep, rest and play etc. In trying to understand human behavior in the 21st century, an ethical perspective is delineated and some starting points for a discussion of ethics from an everyday occupational perspective are investigated. Using examples from contemporary Western society, human occupational behavior is described as imprinted by machine-ethical values. It is argued that since behavior arising from such values has been little formulated or observed, it constitutes a substantial risk factor for ill health and stress. An alternative eco-ethical perspective of occupation, inspired by Skolimowski the Polish professor of eco-philosophy, is proposed. The concept of “ecopation” is introduced as an optional choice denoting occupations that are performed with concern for the ecological context at a pace that gives room for reflection and experience of meaning. The questions raised in this paper may be important for occupational scientists to more fully understand the implicit guidelines of contemporary and future occupation and for occupational therapists taking an active part in future healthcare. © 2002 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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