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  • 1.
    Fleischer, Siegfried
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Bauhn, Lovisa
    Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Patrik
    Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ödegaard-Jensen, Arvid
    Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering/Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dark oxidation of water in soils2013In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 65, no 1, article id 20490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the release of oxygen (O2) under dark conditions in aerobic soils. This unexpected process is hidden by respiration which constitutes the dominating reversal O2 flux. By using H218O in different soils, we confirmed that 16O18O and 18O2 released under dark soil conditions originated from added H218O. Water is the only large-scale source of electrons for reduction of CO2 in soils, but it has not been considered as an electron donor because of the very strong oxidation system needed. A high share of soil inorganic material seems to favor the release of O2. © 2013 S. Fleischer et al.

  • 2.
    Fleischer, Siegfried
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Bouse, Ivo
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Nitrogen cycling drives a strong within-soil CO2-sink2008In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 782-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For about three decades, it has not been possible to completely balance global carbon emissions into known pools. A residual (or 'missing') sink remains. Here evidence is presented that part of soil respiration is allocated into an internal soil CO2-sink localized to the saprophytic subsystem (roots excluded). The process occurs in forest, agricultural and grassland soils and is favoured by high N-deposition. Chemoautotrophic nitrification has a key role, and the most efficient internal CO2-sequestration occurs concurrently with lowest soil nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, despite considerable N-loading. Not until drastic N-supply occurs, does the CO2-sink successively breakdown, and nitrate concentrations increase, leading to NO3--leaching. Within-soil CO2-uptake seems to be of the same magnitude as the missing carbon sink. It may be gradually enforced by the ongoing input of nitrogen to the biosphere.

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