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  • 1.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Bäcklund, Berit
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hjort-Telhede, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Virtual patient cases for active student participation in nursing education2018In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 63-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A didactive method which promote a more active student participation (ASP), Virtual Patient (VP) cases  may be a valuable intervention. VP cases are defined as interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios for healthcare education. VP cases are excellent for training clinical reasoning skills.

    The aim of the study was to investigate utilization of VP cases for ASP in nursing education, regarding student’s learning experience.

    The design was an intervention study, 58 students in the third semester of six in the nursing program were included in the study. In 2016-2017, interventions have been conducted in the Human Biomedicine course with the purpose to develop a course concept that included didactic methods that promoted ASP. The students performed four VP cases individually at home. Before solving  the VP cases, the students had lectures in medicine science for example concerning chest organs diseases. In order to be a complement to that lecture the VP case was about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The lectures were followed up with seminars where the students were able to ask questions regarding conducted VP cases. After each performed VP case, the student answered a self -evaluation form with open ended questions.  Data was conducted using content analysis.

    The result showed that the students found the VP cases challenging and motivational. The VPs taught them to think wide and stimulated to search for more knowledge. Finally they thought it was a good way to test themselves and appreciated the direct feedback, lack of knowledge became visible at once. © 2018 OMICS International

  • 2.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Rasmusson, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Using academic reflection for examination in simulated environment2018In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 53-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nursing education, in semester four of six, in the course of 10 weeks clinical practice the final individual exam has developed. The aim was to deepen the clinical reasoning and make it more visible. The aim was also to give the student the possibility to reflect on the learning objectives, to identify additional knowledge needs and progression, which is a kind of learning recommended by higher education in Sweden. The academic reflection should have a clear purpose and show evidence of learning. Such a reflection requires that the student can use theory from the education to describe, explain and discuss critical events and their importance to future professional practice.

     Two classes with 75 nursing students participated in the study. One pair of students conducted a complex scenario in simulated environment during one hour including feedback. Another pair observed the scenario for identifying clinical reasoning, patient safety and team work. Then the pairs changed roles. Afterwards the students were instructed to make an academic reflection on their learning and progression based on seven open questions in a learning platform survey. Qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis.

    Students expressed that the scenarios trained the ability to manage acute situations, team communication, plan and prioritize nursing actions and prepare for future profession.

    The students felt that it was an excellent form of examination as the academic reflection forced the student to be aware of individual strengths and weaknesses and on the basis of this identify lack of knowledge.© 2018 OMICS International

  • 3.
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Healthy aging and self-management: Visual ability as a risk factor of falling among independently living seniors – What methods are to be used?2016In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 5, no 4 (Suppl), p. 145-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Injuries among seniors such as fall injuries are one major problem today even though various actions are taken in promoting healthy ageing and self-management. However age is one of the most important independent fall predictors since the body does change with age. A decline of visual ability is one of the natural changes and it is known that affected visual ability is one of the most predictive risk factor of falling both independently and in combination with other risk factors. In a population of independently living seniors 70 years and older (n=212) 43%, 36 men and 55 women, reported at least one fall. Both perceived and performance-based visual ability and its association to falls were investigated. The National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) was used assessing various dimensions of self-reported vision functioning in daily life activities such as going down steps or curbs, and difficulties in noticing objects off to the side while walking along. Significant associations with falling (p<5%) were found for nine out of eleven NEI VFQ- 25 vision-related subscales for men, but none for women. However regarding performance-based visual ability such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereopsis and visual field no associations were found with falls(p<5%). The majority of the seniors presented normal performance- based visual ability even though falls were common. One reason may be that at an eye clinic the conditions are optimal and standardized and do not agree with the conditions in the seniors’ daily life where difficulties may occur. The results shows that when planning fall prevention actions it is of importance investigating seniors’ perceived visual ability when performing various daily life activities.

  • 4.
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perceived functional visual ability and risk of falling among independently living seniors2014In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 125-125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The bright side of life - Emotional support in elderly care2014In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 75-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: When older patients are in need of care the desire for help is often related to practical duties, but they also express a preference for support with the emotional difficulties that disease and illness cause. The concept of support in nursing is widely used and in nursing practice it is seldom specified which kind of support that has been performed.

    Aim: Aim was to explore and describe which supportive intervention registered nurses use in municipal elderly home care settings and if it is in agreement with the patient’s preferences.

    Methods: One retrospective descriptive study (I) were conducted and followed up by three qualitative studies using Grounded Theory as a method (II-IV). Grounded Theory allowed to explore actions/interactions and processes that occur between complex social phenomena. A process is seen as a continuous action in relation to a determinate purpose to reach a goal with a problem or a situation and actors can choose actions to influence the course of events.

    Data collection and sampling: I/Using a web based form describing 7053 interventions given to patients 80 years or older during the months of April and October 2004-2008. II/ Observation of 12 registered nurses supportive interventions during the home visit of 36 patients between 80 and 102 years. III/ Interviews with 16 registered nurses. IV/Interviews with 18 patients between 80 and 96 years.

    Results: Combined, the four studies show in a substantive theory that supportive interventions were based on patient’s preferences and guided by their emotions. The emotional support resulted in that the patient could experience serenity. Serenity is a state of relief and the moment required for the patient to be able to move forward. Patients lost or reduced ability to process their emotions makes that they get stuck in a state, which fatigue them with additional experience of disease and illness. To get out of their state the patient searched the registered nurse whose mission is to identify their needs in order that they could find relief. The theory also shows the strengths and weaknesses in the process. Emotional support should be developed as a nursing intervention and be integrated as a part of nursing. 

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