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  • 1.
    Osz, Katalin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydström, Annie
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Informat Technology, Monash Art Design & Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Broström, Robert
    Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Building Collaborative Test Practices: Design Ethnography and WOz in Autonomous Driving Research2018In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 37, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a novel way of performing experimental "Wizard of Oz" (WOz) User Experience (UX) research that specifically targets driving in different levels of self-driving modes. The reasons for exploring the possibilities of combining experimental and ethnographic WOz-testing have been twofold. On the one hand, this mixed-method approach responds to a growing body of critique concerning how the WOz test is biased by the claim that it explores real-life behaviour in an experimental setting. On the other hand, our approach also meets the demands for innovative research methodologies that can contribute to deeper understandings of how to better evaluate and account for human expectations and experiences when automated technologies become integrated in everyday life contexts. This knowledge is inevitable for a broader understanding of the overall user experience and expectations of autonomous driving and, more specifically, building an interdisciplinary collaborative testing approach.

  • 2.
    Tärning, Betty
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjödén, Björn
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Haake, Magnus
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Young Children’s Experience and Preference of Feedback: Sense and Sensibility2018In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 37, p. 206-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the effects of adding visual continuous feedback in the form of feedback bars to a teachable-agent based learning game in mathematics. Forty-five (45) children, 8- to 12-years-old, from three Swedish school classes used the game during four math lessons. The focus was on how feedback to the students regarding their teachable agents learning progression – and different detailedness of such feedback – affects how the students (in a teacher role) experience the learning game. The results suggest that students were positive towards receiving immediate and continuous feedback, but their preferences with respect to the detailedness of the feedback differed according to their age. We found a divergence as to the preferred number of bars, where the 3rd and 5th graders preferred 1 or 3 bars but where the 2nd graders preferred the more detailed version (6 bars) despite their lack of understanding of what the different bars represented.

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