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  • 1.
    Björkén-Nyberg, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hearing, Seeing, Experiencing: Perspective Taking and Emotional Engagement through the Vocalisation of Jane Eyre, Heart of Darkness and Things fall apart2020In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 63-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Readers’ emotional engagement with fiction is a busy research area situated at the intersection of cognitive, affective and narrative theory. Perspective taking is a feature that cuts across the disciplines since the narrative situation is crucial for communicating experiences of narrators and characters in literary texts. However, what has been explored in less detail is how the vocalisation of print text facilitates an empathetic response due to the expressive impact of the human voice so that narratives may be visualised and experienced in a variety of ways. Within audionarratology, the concept of voice is undergoing a redefinition since it ceases to be textually mediated and can be experienced directly. Audiobook narration is a case in point. In the present study it is argued that empathy is a mediating agency that resides in the vocalisation of text rather than in the text itself. For the purpose of exploring this phenomenon, a pilot study was carried out. Three canonical English texts that had previously been studied in their entirety in print by a group of students were accessed in part in a remediated audio format. The listening experiment showed that the individual voice profile of each of the narrating actors had a significant impact on perspective taking and emotional engagement. © 2020 IJLS; Printed in the USA by Lulu Press Inc.

  • 2.
    Björkén-Nyberg, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Vocalising motherhood: The metaphorical conceptualisation of voice in listener responses to The girl on the train by Paula Hawkins2018In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to conceptualise voice as vocalisation. Taking a multidisciplinary approach to the concept of voice, the study is informed by theoretical considerations pertaining to audionarratology, voice semiotics, and cognitive science. It is argued that the physical articulation of voice reinforces metaphorical implications. Through the illustrative example of the audiobook version of the bestselling thriller The girl on the train (2015) by Paula Hawkins, the metaphorical overtones of voice quality are discussed. In addition, the vocal impact on mental imagery, daydreaming, and phenomenal consciousness is analysed. Based on data collected from the Audible website for listener reviews, it is concluded that voice performance has an impact on the way in which both plot and discursive features are perceived. Importantly, the study shows that the gendered theme of motherhood, foregrounded in Hawkins’s novel, takes on new dimensions when the text is vocalised.

  • 3.
    Cudmore, Danielle
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Prophet, poet, seer, skald: Poetic diction in Merlínusspá2018In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 29-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the use of figurative language in Gunnlagur Leifsson’s Merlínusspá, an early 13th-century Icelandic translation of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Prophetiae Merlini. Gunnlaugr has translated Geoffrey’s Latin prose into Icelandic poetry and added kennings, multipart circumlocutions for nouns, to Geoffrey’s animal allegory. Particularly notable is Gunnlaugr’s use of elaborate kennings in a meter and poetic form that do not demand them. This suggests that he understood kennings as having a potential role in the prophetic and figurative language he rendered into Icelandic. Building on previous scholarship, I proceed from the assumption that Gunnlaugr is conscious in his use of kennings to supplement the symbolic and figurative language of Geoffrey’s text, and that even if his main intention is to provide ornament, he does so in an original and thoughtful way that may provide a glimpse of academic understanding of kennings as figurative language in late 12th and early 13th-century Iceland. Ultimately, Gunnlaugr’s kennings provide an interpretive multidimensionality and culture-bridging effect, serving to link the ancient Britain of Merlin’s prophecies to Gunnlaugr’s Iceland, and Icelandic literature to that of the wider world. This article is largely intended as an overview of Gunnlaugr’s use of figurative language, in particular for non-specialists in Old Norse who nevertheless might take some interest in this example of Arthuriana norræna. © 2018 IJLS; Printed in the USA by Lulu Press Inc.

  • 4.
    Hildebrand, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    "As fayre an handid man": Malory's figurative language2018In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Figurative language in Malory is not very varied, but is strongly connected to chivalry and the community standards that uphold it. This paper deals briefly with set figurative phrases, but focuses on similes and some other figurative phrases, especially ‘out of measure’ and phrases involving hands, as examples of this. The figurative language used has a number of functions: the similes are not original or intended to be so, but instead connect the depiction of chivalry to other chivalric texts; the phrases concerned with measure reminds the reader if the standards of the chivalric community, and the phrases involving hands retain a connection to the literal hands of the knight characters, bringing the violence perpetrated by a knight's hands into focus. The figurative language of Malory, while not as diverse and varied as we might expect were this a modern text, fulfils literary functions that are essential to this chivalric romance. © International Journal of Language Studies 2016

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Monica
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    L1 (Swedish) versus L2 (English) mastery of free combinations of noun/verb + preposition as compared to multi-word verbs2014In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 27-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present investigation, 15 first-term university students were asked to produce 100 idiomatically used prepositions of varying frequency in given contexts in Swedish (L1) and English (L2) respectively, 40 of which were used in free combinations of noun/verb + preposition as in ‘reason for’ and 60 of which were part of multi-word verbs such as ‘take off’ and ‘get down to (business)’. Native speaker results of English were used as a point of reference. One main research question was thus addressed: In quantitative and qualitative terms, what productive L1/L2 knowledge do advanced students have of on the one hand bound prepositions in free combinations and on the other hand of bound prepositions in combinations of verbs and particles categorized as phrasal verbs? The results show that, while the Swedish informants achieved almost the same L1 result as the native speaker of English did in his mother tongue, they displayed a poor L2 knowledge. More importantly, the results show that while particles used in L2 multi-word combinations appear to be stored as units together with the preceding verbs, this was not the case with prepositions used in free combinations where knowledge of the meaning of the preceding noun/verb was very often combined with an uncertainty as to what preposition to choose. © IJLS 2014

  • 6.
    Rath Foley, Anna
    et al.
    The University of York, York, United Kingdom.
    Karlsson, Monica
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    The language of non-commercial advertising: A pragmatic approach2021In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 99-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study explores the language of non-commercial advertising, both quantitatively and qualitatively, within the framework of pragmatics. The main incentive is (1) to investigate how creators of such advertising aim to seek attention, inform and persuade, and (2) to examine whether non-commercial and commercial advertising differ linguistically. Orbiting around key notions of Relevance Theory and Tanaka’s pragmatic approach to advertising, the study pays attention to how collected advertisements use internal and external contexts in their explicit and implicit language, and whether their language complies with the hierarchy present in commercial advertising in which information is subordinated to persuasion. The findings show that language functions in non-commercial advertising are frequently incorporated into complex arrangements in which they sometimes overlap and/or collaborate. Such arrangements appear to cause the audience to be inventive and to use extra processing efforts in solving explicit and implicit problems of the stimulus. Moreover, it is suggested that non-commercial and commercial advertising do not differ from one another in a linguistic sense. There are, indeed, times when non-commercial advertisers leave out clear persuasion and instead aim their main focus at improving the audience’s knowledge. In a purely linguistic sense, however, it is shown that persuasive language is always embedded, which indicates that the genre is not necessarily less persuasive than its commercial counterpart. Copyright © IJLS 2007 

  • 7.
    Svensson, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Monica
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Students´ relational involvement in literary worlds: Levels of engagement when reading fiction in a first and second language2020In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this paper is to examine students´ relational engagement in a short story, as well as their use of mental state expressions in responding to it in three different writing assignments, one of which involved photo elicitation. A secondary aim is to examine and compare the relational engagement between students reading the story in Swedish (i.e., their L1) and English (i.e., their L2), respectively. The theoretical framework draws on research in relational engagement/transactional theory, the Appraisal system, Dual Code Theory (DCT), and the Linguistic Threshold Hypothesis. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. A total of 33 students participated in the study, half of whom read the story in Swedish, and half in English. The results show that the students used a wide range of mental state expressions, but also that these expressions changed in accordance with task formulation. The results also show that the photo-elicitation assignment yielded the strongest relational engagement. Furthermore, students reading the story in Swedish generally demonstrated a stronger relational engagement than students reading the story in English. © 2020 IJLS; Printed in the USA by Lulu Press Inc.

  • 8.
    Söderström, Filippa
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Thorén, Jakob
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Karlsson, Monica
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Pun intended: The use of word play to teach polysemous words in English as a second language2022In: International Journal of Language Studies, ISSN 2157-4898, E-ISSN 2157-4901, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 95-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate to what extent Swedish upper secondary school learners of L2 English understand the meanings of polysemous words and whether puns can be used to teach such words. A test and two questionnaires were constructed to retrieve data from both students and teachers. The results of the study show that Swedish upper secondary school learners of L2 English generally have an acceptable knowledge of polysemous words, but that the students’ comprehension depends on the program they attend. Based on these results, it was also concluded that puns can be used to teach students about the meanings of polysemous words. The results of the questionnaires display that students in general have a positive attitude towards using puns in the classroom, and that they find them entertaining and humorous. In addition, the students also saw this approach as beneficial to their motivation and retention. Lastly, the teachers expressed that using humor can strengthen the learning process, and if the students find the teaching situation enjoyable, they learn faster, and their retention is thus increased. © 2022 IJLS; Printed in the USA by Lulu Press Inc.

1 - 8 of 8
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