hh.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 8 av 8
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Ahlborg, Mikael
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Morgan, Antony
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI). Glasgow Caledonian University in London, London, United Kingdom.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Into the realm of social capital for adolescents: A latent profile analysis2019Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, nr 2, artikel-id e0212564Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Recent reports of increasing prevalence of frequent health complaints and mental health problems among adolescents call for directing more attention on determinants of adolescent health. The relationship between health and social capital has gained increased attention since the early 2000’s and research at review level confirms the importance of social capital for health outcomes, despite methodological heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to identify distinct profiles of family, school and peer social capital in a nationally representative sample of adolescents and to explore health outcomes in those profiles.

    Method

    Cross-sectional data from the Swedish Health Behaviour of School-aged Children 2013/14 was used for this study. The analytical sample consisted of 7,804 adolescents aged 11-, 13- and 15-years. Items representing sense of belonging and emotional support were assessed in three contexts; family, school and among peers. Latent profile analyses (LPA) were run to determine social capital profiles. Health outcomes included frequent health complaints and life satisfaction, while socioeconomic status and genders were included as predictors.

    Results

    The results show that five distinct profiles best represent the data for 11- and 15-year olds, while a four-profile model was optimal for 13-year olds. Some profiles were recurrent between age groups but unique profiles were also found. Health outcomes were significantly different between profiles depending on levels of social capital in the different contexts.

    Conclusions

    This study provides novel insight into how social capital co-occurs among adolescents within the contexts of family, school and peers and how this translates into differences in health outcomes. The national representativeness of the sample increases the implications of the results and contributes to meaningful insights that help explain the interactions of social capital in multiple contexts, complementing what is previously known about the relationship with adolescent health. © 2019 Ahlborg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 2.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Russo, Paola
    Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Kourides, Yannis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Sion, Isabelle
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Molnár, Denés
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Rodríguez, Gerardo
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ben-Shlomo, Yoav
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Howe, Laura
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom, MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Bammann, Karin
    Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research (IPP), Faculty for Human and Health Sciences, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Foraita, Ronja
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Tilling, Kate
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Early Life Factors and Inter-Country Heterogeneity in BMI Growth Trajectories of European Children: The IDEFICS Study2016Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 2, artikel-id e0149268Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Starting from birth, this explorative study aimed to investigate between-country differences in body mass index (BMI) trajectories and whether early life factors explain these differences.

    Methods

    The sample included 7,644 children from seven European countries (Belgium, Cyprus, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain, Sweden) participating in the multi-centre IDEFICS study. Information on early life factors and in total 53,409 repeated measurements of height and weight from 0 to <12 years of age were collected during the baseline (2007/2008) and follow-up examination (2009/2010) supplemented by records of routine child health visits. Country-specific BMI growth curves were estimated using fractional polynomial mixed effects models. Several covariates focussing on early life factors were added to the models to investigate their role in the between-countries differences.

    Results

    Large between-country differences were observed with Italian children showing significantly higher mean BMI values at all ages ≥ 3 years compared to the other countries. For instance, at age 11 years mean BMI values in Italian boys and girls were 22.3 [21.9;22.8; 99% confidence interval] and 22.0 [21.5;22.4], respectively, compared to a range of 18.4 [18.1;18.8] to 20.3 [19.8;20.7] in boys and 18.2 [17.8;18.6] to 20.3 [19.8;20.7] in girls in the other countries. After adjustment for early life factors, differences between country-specific BMI curves became smaller. Maternal BMI was the factor being most strongly associated with BMI growth (p<0.01 in all countries) with associations increasing during childhood. Gestational weight gain (GWG) was weakly associated with BMI at birth in all countries. In some countries, positive associations between BMI growth and children not being breastfed, mothers’ smoking during pregnancy and low educational level of parents were found.

    Conclusion

    Early life factors seem to explain only some of the inter-country variation in growth. Maternal BMI showed the strongest association with children’s BMI growth.

  • 3.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    et al.
    Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Mikael
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM), Centrum för studier av politik, kommunikation och medier (CPKM).
    The Cultural Evolution of Democracy: Saltational Changes in A Political Regime Landscape2011Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 11, artikel-id e28270Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitions to democracy are most often considered the outcome of historical modernization processes. Socio-economic changes, such as increases in per capita GNP, education levels, urbanization and communication, have traditionally been found to be correlates or ‘requisites’ of democratic reform. However, transition times and the number of reform steps have not been studied comprehensively. Here we show that historically, transitions to democracy have mainly occurred through rapid leaps rather than slow and incremental transition steps, with a median time from autocracy to democracy of 2.4 years, and overnight in the reverse direction. Our results show that autocracy and democracy have acted as peaks in an evolutionary landscape of possible modes of institutional arrangements. Only scarcely have there been slow incremental transitions. We discuss our results in relation to the application of phylogenetic comparative methods in cultural evolution and point out that the evolving unit in this system is the institutional arrangement, not the individual country which is instead better regarded as the ‘host’ for the political system.

  • 4.
    Nygren, Jens Martin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bryder, David
    Lund University, Department of Experimental Medical Science, Sweden.
    A novel assay to trace proliferation history in vivo reveals that enhanced divisional kinetics accompany loss of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal2008Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, nr 11, s. art. no. e3710-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The maintenance of lifelong blood cell production ultimately rests on rare hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that reside in the bone marrow microenvironment. HSCs are traditionally viewed as mitotically quiescent relative to their committed progeny. However, traditional techniques for assessing proliferation activity in vivo, such as measurement of BrdU uptake, are incompatible with preservation of cellular viability. Previous studies of HSC proliferation kinetics in vivo have therefore precluded direct functional evaluation of multi-potency and self-renewal, the hallmark properties of HSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a non-invasive labeling technique that allowed us to identify and isolate candidate HSCs and early hematopoietic progenitor cells based on their differential in vivo proliferation kinetics. Such cells were functionally evaluated for their abilities to multi-lineage reconstitute myeloablated hosts. CONCLUSIONS: Although at least a few HSC divisions per se did not influence HSC function, enhanced kinetics of divisional activity in steady state preceded the phenotypic changes that accompanied loss of HSC self-renewal. Therefore, mitotic quiescence of HSCs, relative to their committed progeny, is key to maintain the unique functional and molecular properties of HSCs.

  • 5.
    Sandberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM).
    Lundberg, Per
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Political Institutions and Their Historical Dynamics2012Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 10, artikel-id e45838Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, “anocracy” and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem “canalized”, i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  • 6.
    Troast, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America.
    Suhling, Frank
    Institut für Geoökologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Jinguji, Hiroshi
    School of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Miyagi University, Miyagi, Japan.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Bio- och miljösystemforskning (BLESS).
    Ware, Jessica
    Department of Biology, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America.
    A Global Population Genetic Study of Pantala flavescens2016Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 3, artikel-id e0148949Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Among terrestrial arthropods, the dragonfly species Pantala flavescens is remarkable due to their nearly global distribution and extensive migratory ranges; the largest of any known insect. Capable of migrating across oceans, the potential for high rates of gene flow among geographically distant populations is significant. It has been hypothesized that P. flavescens may be a global panmictic population but no sufficient genetic evidence has been collected thus far. Through a population genetic analysis of P. flavescens samples from North America, South America, and Asia, the current study aimed to examine the extent at which gene flow is occurring on a global scale and discusses the implications of the genetic patterns we uncovered on population structure and genetic diversity of the species. This was accomplished using PCR-amplified cytochrome oxidase one (CO1) mitochondrial DNA data to reconstruct phylogenetic trees, a haplotype network, and perform molecular variance analyses. Our results suggested high rates of gene flow are occurring among all included geographic regions; providing the first significant evidence that Pantala flavescens should be considered a global panmictic population. © 2016 Troast et al.

  • 7.
    Vaiciukynas, Evaldas
    et al.
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Verikas, Antanas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för informationsteknologi, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR Centrum för tillämpade intelligenta system (IS-lab). Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Gelzinis, Adas
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Bacauskiene, Marija
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Detecting Parkinson's disease from sustained phonation and speech signals2017Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, nr 10, artikel-id e0185613Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates signals from sustained phonation and text-dependent speech modalities for Parkinson’s disease screening. Phonation corresponds to the vowel /a/ voicing task and speech to the pronunciation of a short sentence in Lithuanian language. Signals were recorded through two channels simultaneously, namely, acoustic cardioid (AC) and smart phone (SP) microphones. Additional modalities were obtained by splitting speech recording into voiced and unvoiced parts. Information in each modality is summarized by 18 well-known audio feature sets. Random forest (RF) is used as a machine learning algorithm, both for individual feature sets and for decision-level fusion. Detection performance is measured by the out-of-bag equal error rate (EER) and the cost of log-likelihood-ratio. Essentia audio feature set was the best using the AC speech modality and YAAFE audio feature set was the best using the SP unvoiced modality, achieving EER of 20.30% and 25.57%, respectively. Fusion of all feature sets and modalities resulted in EER of 19.27% for the AC and 23.00% for the SP channel. Non-linear projection of a RF-based proximity matrix into the 2D space enriched medical decision support by visualization. © 2017 Vaiciukynas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 8.
    Walsh, Stuart
    et al.
    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Pontén, Annica
    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jovinge, Stefan
    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Myogenic reprogramming of bone marrow derived cells in a W⁴¹Dmd(mdx) deficient mouse model2011Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 11, s. e27500-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of expression of dystrophin leads to degeneration of muscle fibers and infiltration of connective and adipose tissue. Cell transplantation therapy has been proposed as a treatment for intractable muscle degenerative disorders. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of bone-marrow derived cells (BMDC) to contribute to non-haematopoietic tissues including epithelium, heart, liver, skeletal muscle and brain following transplantation by means of fusion and reprogramming. A key issue is the extent to which fusion and reprogramming can occur in vivo, particularly under conditions of myogenic deterioration.To investigate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow transplantation in monogenetic myopathy, green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP+) bone marrow cells were transplanted into non-irradiated c-kit receptor-deficient (W⁴¹) mdx mice. This model allows BMDC reconstitution in the absence of irradiation induced myeloablation. We provide the first report of BMDC fusion in a W⁴¹Dmd(mdx) deficient mouse model.In the absence of irradiation induced injury, few GFP+ cardiomyocytes and muscle fibres were detected 24 weeks post BMT. It was expected that the frequency of fusion in the hearts of W⁴¹Dmd(mdx) mice would be similar to frequencies observed in infarcted mice. Although, it is clear from this study that individual cardiomyocytes with monogenetic deficiencies can be rescued by fusion, it is as clear that in the absence of irradiation, the formation of stable and reprogrammed fusion hybrids occurs, with the current techniques, at very low levels in non-irradiated recipients.

1 - 8 av 8
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf