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  • 1.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Linus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Christina
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Korp, Peter
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Sport Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of an Empowerment-Based Health-Promotion School Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Adolescents in a Multicultural Area2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity (PA) decreases with age, and interventions are needed to promote PA during adolescence, especially, among those in low-socioeconomic status (SES) areas. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention had any effects on changes in (a) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), (b) sedentary time (SED), (c) exercise training (ET) frequency, and (d) ET duration, among adolescents. Participants (aged 12⁻13 years at baseline) from one intervention school and two control schools, were recruited from a multicultural area of Sweden, characterized by low-SES. During the course of the two-year intervention, a total of 135 participants (43% boys) were included in the study. The intervention was developed and implemented as a result of cooperation and shared decision-making among the researchers and the participants. MVPA and SED were measured with accelerometers, and ET frequency and duration was self-reported at the beginning of the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade, respectively. There were no significant effects of the two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention on changes in the accelerometer-measured MVPA and SED, or the self-reported ET frequency and duration, among the adolescents. Overall, the intervention was unsuccessful at promoting PA and reducing SED. Several possible explanations for the intervention's lack of effects are discussed.

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  • 2.
    Jonsson, Linus
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Christina
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Korp, Peter
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Facilitators of Physical Activity: Voices of Adolescents in a Disadvantaged Community2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 8, article id 839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing socioeconomic inequalities in the health and well-being of adolescents, the voices of adolescents in disadvantaged communities regarding facilitators of physical activity (PA) have received relatively little attention. In response, the purpose of this study was to illuminate what adolescents in a multicultural community of low socioeconomic status (SES) in Sweden convey concerning facilitators of PA. Adolescents (n = 53, aged 12–13 years) were recruited from a school in a multicultural community of low SES in Sweden. Following an interpretive approach, 10 focus group interviews were conducted to produce data for a qualitative content analysis. When the adolescents mentioned PA, they mostly referred to spontaneous PA rather than organized PA, and expressed that they enjoyed their PA engagement, which they stated was promoted by the variation of PA, available options for PA, their physical skills, and the presence of peers. They reported that social support from family and friends facilitated their PA, and they offered several suggestions regarding how the school environment could better support their PA. From the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT), the results stress the importance of facilitating intrinsic motivation with a supportive PA environment in which adolescents can satisfy their needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland

  • 3.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Håman, Linn
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    Department of Research and Development within Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Voices from Pupil Participation in the Health Promotion Intervention “Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH]” in Primary and Middle School2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 22, article id 4543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve the learning conditions and health of schoolchildren, the Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH] program in Sweden has introduced additional mandatory moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] that lasts for 30 min three times a week. The PE teachers used a child-centered coaching approach to support all pupils. The aim of this study was to explore pupils’ perception and experience of PuLH that has been implemented in primary and middle schools in Sweden. We have taken into account children’s rights perspectives and adopted an exploratory and interpretive approach. In total, 73 pupils (34 girls, 39 boys, grades 4–9) were recruited through purposive sampling. 13 focus group interviews (n = 71) and individual interviews (n = 2) were carried out. All interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in three major themes: ‘promotes academic performance and a learning school environment’, ‘promotes health and well-being’, and ‘individual and structural barriers’. From children’s perspective, the results highlight the importance of teachers and principals taking into account the interests and needs of all pupils, to have a well-planned MVPA intervention and to deal with issues regarding body ideals. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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    Voices from Pupil Participation in the Health Promotion Intervention “Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH]” in Primary and Middle School
  • 4.
    Ullah, Sami
    et al.
    Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Perak, Malaysia.
    Daud, Hanita
    Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Perak, Malaysia.
    Dass, Sarat C.
    School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences, Heriot-Watt University Malaysia, Putrajaya, Malaysia.
    Fanaee Tork, Hadi
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Kausarian, Husnul
    Department of Geological Engineering, Universitas Islam Riau, Pekanbaru, Indonesia.
    Khalil, Alamgir
    Department of Statistics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan.
    Space-Time Clustering Characteristics of Tuberculosis in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan, 2015–20192020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of tuberculosis (TB) cases in Pakistan ranks fifth in the world. The National TB Control Program (NTP) has recently reported more than 462,920 TB patients in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan from 2002 to 2017. This study aims to identify spatial and space-time clusters of TB cases in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province Pakistan during 2015–2019 to design effective interventions. The spatial and space-time cluster analyses were conducted at the district-level based on the reported TB cases from January 2015 to April 2019 using space-time scan statistics (SaTScan). The most likely spatial and space-time clusters were detected in the northern rural part of the province. Additionally, two districts in the west were detected as the secondary space-time clusters. The most likely space-time cluster shows a tendency of spread toward the neighboring districts in the central part, and the most likely spatial cluster shows a tendency of spread toward the neighboring districts in the south. Most of the space-time clusters were detected at the start of the study period 2015–2016. The potential TB clusters in the remote rural part might be associated to the dry–cool climate and lack of access to the healthcare centers in the remote areas. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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